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Old January 12th, 2013, 01:16 AM   #1
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Clutch slip on 95 model 600SS

Just bought a 95 600SS, when I got it I rode it home and while giving it some curry in 2nd the clutch slipped.
After a 200km ride today the clutch slips in any gear.

So I did a google found the clutch is the same as the 750SS.

Downloaded a manual for the 750. So I know how to do it.

Question. To linings fail commonly? Or could it be springs or something else.
I played with the lever and changed dial settings to see if it was that. But that's not going to do squat. That only operates the master cylinder.


Finally. Parts manual for a 95 600SS. Are they avail??

Steve
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Old January 13th, 2013, 06:15 PM   #2
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[1098 S]

 
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The mileage the bike has done would be relevant. Yes, friction plates do wear out. Now that you have ridden it slipping for a period the plates will be cooked. When you remove them they may be dark and smell a little.
So you need a new set of friction plates.
The oil it is running will also be relevant. If too heavy a grade of oil - or one with too many slippery additives - has been used (maybe to quieten the engine before you bought it..) that could also cause it to slip. 10/40 (or 15/40 in hot conditions) is the correct 'weight' of oil. Use bike-specific oil which will suit the fact that your clutch on this model runs in the engine oil.
Be very wary of adjusting the screw on the lever (it should have a spot of glue on it from standard) as this can prevent the hydraulics bleeding back, and cause pressure in the hydraulic system which will - yep - cause the clutch to slip. The adjusting screw needs a slight clearance from the master cylinder piston when the lever is in the relaxed position.
So change the oil - it is easier to work on the clutch at the same time as draining the engine oil - and fit new friction plates. Also check the free length of the springs - a new set of these may be worthwhile.
Avoid fitting springs which are stiffer than stock. These are a pain while riding in traffic, and not necessary if the clutch is set up correctly.
The other thing you can do is get the steel plates grit blasted. Try and find someone who has done this before. The plates need to be on a solid plate during blasting or they can distort.
The 600 engine isn't overly endowed with power, so getting the stock clutch to not slip with the stock springs shouldn't be too hard.
Another trick I do to 750s which are making more power than stock is to drill holes in the tags between the slots in the clutch basket. This not only lightens the clutch, but also increases oil presence around the plates, and helps it work better.
And lube the lever pivot and flush/bleed your hydraulic fluid to finish the job.
Good luck. Let us know how you went.
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Old January 13th, 2013, 06:20 PM   #3
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As to the manual - the Haynes one which covers a range of models is better than nothing, but not great.
They come up on special from time to time as these bikes are getting on a bit.
A factory manual for an 18-year-old bike may be difficult to obtain now.
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Old January 14th, 2013, 02:02 AM   #4
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Thanks guys.
Bike has 7500km on ODO. So only run in
Bought it thru a Ducati importer. It's a Jap import. 600SS is very rare in Australia.
I was going to take it back to the dealer, but as they will sting me to replace the clutch, I'll do it and save $$$. Bikes over 10 years have no warrantee here from dealers. I was ok with that.
I might order a set of springs incase. Can't be bothered to do it twice.

Also. Will a gasket instead of sealant be better and will the 1 mm or so affect the clutch throw as the slave cylinder is on the clutch cover?

Steve
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Old January 14th, 2013, 03:27 PM   #5
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Don't use a gasket. A good quality sealant is the shot.

The factory uses (grey) Three Bond, but the brand is not critical. Getting the surfaces clean is.

Whatever you use, apply it frugally..

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Old January 14th, 2013, 03:45 PM   #6
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Any reason why I should not use a gasket? I just hate sealant mess

Steve
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Old January 14th, 2013, 04:00 PM   #7
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The same reason the factory stopped using them about the time your bike was made.
If you use the sealant carefully/correctly there shouldn't be any mess.
It will seal better, and not need re-tightening.
It can usually be removed by damping it with fuel, then wiped off.
And the 600SS was not all that rare here - I had several customers (mostly women) with this model.
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Old January 14th, 2013, 04:03 PM   #8
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And replace the O-ring that fits with the cover while you are there, and check the condition of the oil seal in the cover that fits onto the crankshaft.
They can get a bit hard over time, particularly if left to sit for long periods.
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Old January 14th, 2013, 04:28 PM   #9
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Thanks Pat. Will do. Any recommended sealant?
I looked a long time to find a 600ss. Was not easy. As most were very used. I paid top dollar for this one, but its very tidy with only a few mods done.
Steve
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Old January 15th, 2013, 02:02 AM   #10
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ducatis in the registry:
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Read on a few forums that the hydraulics may cause the slipping, trying to get my head around this. I'll bleed the clutch up and see how i go. or am i wasting my time?

Steve
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