1098s Worn clutch disc question - ducati.org forum | the home for ducati owners and enthusiasts

Remember me
Login  |   Register

ducati.org forum | the home for ducati owners and enthusiasts > Superbike Model Specific > 1098/1198

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old February 24th, 2020, 02:44 PM   #1
Member

No ducatis in the registry

 
Redox305's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Posts: 24
1098s Worn clutch disc question

What’s up guys, long story short, the bike started to feel like the clutch was slipping when I was riding, a block away from home it just stoped engaging, so I thought “ok it might be just a worn clutch disc since I didn’t change them when I was building the bike” so I removed the clutch discs, and they look pretty worn out, some of them are completely gone, now my question is, when I have the bike engaged on first gear shouldn’t the engine be turning and getting compression? I know I don’t have the discs on right now, just something that came in to mind, here a video.

https://youtu.be/82OINFX1b6o
Redox305 is offline   Reply With Quote
Remove Ads
Old February 24th, 2020, 04:35 PM   #2
Senior Member

ducatis in the registry:
[916]

 
Shazaam!'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 1,185
You seem to misunderstand what you're looking at.

There are two types of clutch plates interspersed.

There are smooth plain plates (no friction material) that are splined to attach and move with the inner hub (transmission side).

There are friction plates that have outer tabs that engage and move with the outer basket (engine side). When these wear out enough of their friction material they need to be replaced.

The pressure plate presses the two types of plates together.

The pulled clutch lever via the slave cylinder pushes the pressure plate away which then allows the plain plates and friction plates to slide past each other and this disengages the engine from the transmission and rear wheel.

In your video you spin the inner hub to drive the rear wheel. Without the clutch installed, if you need to feel engine compression you need to turn the clutch basket.
Shazaam! is online now   Reply With Quote
Old February 24th, 2020, 05:18 PM   #3
Member

No ducatis in the registry

 
Redox305's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Posts: 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shazaam! View Post
You seem to misunderstand what you're looking at.

There are two types of clutch plates interspersed.

There are smooth plain plates (no friction material) that are splined to attach and move with the inner hub (transmission side).

There are friction plates that have outer tabs that engage and move with the outer basket (engine side). When these wear out enough of their friction material they need to be replaced.

The pressure plate presses the two types of plates together.

The pulled clutch lever via the slave cylinder pushes the pressure plate away which then allows the plain plates and friction plates to slide past each other and this disengages the engine from the transmission and rear wheel.

In your video you spin the inner hub to drive the rear wheel. Without the clutch installed, if you need to feel engine compression you need to turn the clutch basket.
Hey there thank you very much, I was driving right now and thinking about it, and I remember seeing the basket spinning, so I was wondering if that’s what’s turning the engine, thank you very much! So I think my problem it’s just the friction plates that worn out, I really appreciate your feed back, thank you very much!
Redox305 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On




All times are GMT -7. The time now is 12:27 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.