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Old May 25th, 2011, 10:48 AM   #1
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Tire Pressure

I was wandering what tire pressure everbody was running on the street and the track?

I am currently using 30psi on the front and 35 psi on the rear.
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Old May 25th, 2011, 11:03 AM   #2
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Hi,

30 psi in the front is too less and 35 psi in the rear is too much

I assume you are using Pirelli tires, for detailed informations about tire pressures and much more visit this forum:

http://www.diabloracer.com/phpBB3/vi...c.php?f=4&t=21

Regards, Sascha.
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Old May 25th, 2011, 11:30 AM   #3
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Determining Best Tire Pressures

You'll get a lot of opinions on what tire pressure to run, but the correct tire pressure for you is not a matter of polling other rider's opinion. Here are the basics you'll need to decide for yourself.

Start with the bike manufacturer's recommendation in the owners manual or under-seat sticker. This is the number they consider to be the best balance between handling, grip and tire wear. Further, if you're running alloy wheels on poor pavement, consider adding 2 psi to the recommended tire pressure just to reduce the likelihood of pothole damage. Just as you would for a car, increase the pressure 2 psi or so for sustained high speed operation (or 2-up riding) to reduce rolling friction and casing flexing. Check your tire pressure regularly, as they say.

In order to get optimum handling a tire has to get to its optimum temperature which is different for each brand of tire. Unless you own a tire pyrometer that will measure tire temperature directly, you’ll need to measure it indirectly by checking tire pressure since tire pressure increases with tire temperature. Tire temperature is important to know because too much flexing of the casing of an under-inflated tire for a given riding style and road will result in overheating resulting in less than optimum grip. Over-pressurizing a tire will reduce casing flexing and prevent the tire from getting up to the optimum operating temperature and performance again suffers. Sliding and spinning the tires also increase tire temperatures from friction heating.

A technique for those wanting to get the most out of their tires on the street is to use the 10/20% rule.

First check the tire pressure when the tire is cold. Then take a ride on your favorite twisty piece of road. Then, measure the tire pressure immediately after stopping. If the pressure has risen less than 10% on the front or 15-20% on the rear, the rider should remove air from the tire. So for example, starting at a front tire pressure of 32.5 psi should bring you up to 36 psi hot. Once you obtain this pressure increase for a given rider, bike, tire, road and road temperature combination, check the tire pressure again while cold and record it for future reference.

Each manufacturer is different. Each tire model is different. A tire design that runs cooler needs to run a lower pressure (2-3 psi front) to get up to optimum temperature. The rear tire runs hotter than the front tire, road and track. So the rear tire cold-to-hot increase is greater. Dropping air pressure has the additional side effect of scrubbing more rubber area.

When I used the tire pressures recommended by Ducati (32.5F/36R) for my 916 on my favorite road, I got exactly 10/20% on a set of Bridgestone BT-012SS. So I guess I'm an average rider and the BT-012SS runs at an average operating temperature compared to other brands.

For the track you'll have to drop the cold tire pressures an additional 10/20%. Track operation will get tires hotter (increasing the cold-to-hot pressure range) so starting at say 32/30 psi now should bring you up to the same temperature (and pressure) that 35/39 psi gave you for the street. Don't even think about running these low track cold pressures on the street.

Finally, dropping tire pressures on street tires for track use has its limitations, so street compound tires on the track often get too hot and go beyond sticky to greasy. That's why you have race tires. Race tire compounds are designed for severe operation at these higher temperatures for a limited number of thermal cycles. On the other hand, a race tire on the street usually won't get up to the appropriate temperature for good performance. At street speeds, the race compound often won't perform as well as a street tire.
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Old May 25th, 2011, 11:43 AM   #4
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Depends on the tire brand/model and riding condition. I have BT-016s on my 1098 that I ride in the canyons in Sun Diego. I run 34 PSI front, 32 PSI rear (cold). These setting were recommended by John Pearson: http://www.sportbikesuspensiontuning.net/

John also tuned my suspension - best $50 bucks I've spent on my bike.

This pic from his site is cool:


Last edited by nyquist; May 25th, 2011 at 04:20 PM.
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Old May 25th, 2011, 02:28 PM   #5
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pirelli rosso corsa

street 35r/34f

track 30r/30f cold.
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Old May 26th, 2011, 07:52 AM   #6
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Hope that answers your question, man
The opinions are so varied on this......it`s such a personal thing on how you ride, and how you get the feedback that you need ( you alone need to address that issue )
That said, the 10/20 rule is by far the best way to start for a baseline
That`s it!
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Old May 26th, 2011, 11:17 AM   #7
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John Pearson set my bike's geometry and suspension as well. He's very knowledgeable and professional in the science and art of suspension dynamics. He does our group members' bikes and rides the same canyons our group rides.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nyquist View Post
Depends on the tire brand/model and riding condition. I have BT-016s on my 1098 that I ride in the canyons in Sun Diego. I run 34 PSI front, 32 PSI rear (cold). These setting were recommended by John Pearson: http://www.sportbikesuspensiontuning.net/

John also tuned my suspension - best $50 bucks I've spent on my bike.

This pic from his site is cool:



For street, I'd go with the bike manufacturer's recommended tire pressure as the tires don't build up as much heat as riding on a track. It's a balanced pressure for stability, comfort, and traction.

For the track, I normally go with the tire manufacturer's recommended tire pressure, and if available, pressures for a specific track.

As the demands of track riding on the tires are much greater, the tire pressure rises much quickly so a lower pressure is needed to maintain that fine line between traction and stability in the corners and on the straights or whichever that compliments your preference or riding style.

When measuring, be sure you stick with one method and not combine or mix and match to maintain a consistent reading. (Cold, Off the Track, or Off the Warmers).

Low pressure enhances traction with the sacrifice of stability.

Higher pressure enhances stability with the sacrifice of traction.
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Old May 28th, 2011, 07:30 AM   #8
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Some tyres have much stiffer casings then others.... for example Dunlop is a Much stiffer tyre than a Pirelli. I have found Pirellis need to be run 4-5 psi higher than the Dunlop for the same feel. I use 30 front and 28 rear on the street with the D209GP-A Dunlops. They stick like shit to a blanket but do need a few miles of warm up time. Supercorsa Pirelli's needed 32 front and 32 rear to give me a similar feel and I believe it's due to the much more flexible carcass.
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Old May 28th, 2011, 08:48 AM   #9
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These numbers from Pirelli should be a good place to start.
Attached Images
File Type: pdf Pirelli.pdf (236.2 KB, 3646 views)
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Old May 31st, 2011, 01:26 PM   #10
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DTHUDON, Thanks for that PDF from Pirelli. That was great info. Hot tire pressures, huh? who would a thought? I have been running pressures recommended on the swing arm for my Diablo Streets and my Diablo Rosso Corsas which i ran on my last track day in New Jersey. I used 28 PSI in each for my last 8 sessions which worked well. I used tire heaters so these great tires would be good to go from the first lap to the last.
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Old May 31st, 2011, 10:28 PM   #11
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Not a problem. At least gives a good spot to start from. You can adjust pressure based on what you see on the tire wear (hot tear/cold tear) once you get in the ballpark.
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Old September 29th, 2011, 08:17 PM   #12
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i'm tracking my 1198s on sunday for the third time at Fontana. But for the first time i am runing the dunlop Q2's. i ran 32f 30r on the stock supercorsa rubber. does anyone have a recomendation for Q2 cold pressure?
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Old September 30th, 2011, 09:42 AM   #13
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Pirelli diablo supercorsa;
Street 32R 34F
Track 29R 31F

I tried different settings and this is what it works for my.
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Old September 30th, 2011, 10:29 AM   #14
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New Tires, New Type. I would recommended the Track Special: start at 29psi F&R cold.

Are you using warmers? or just cold tires right to the track ?
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Old September 30th, 2011, 10:57 AM   #15
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I run 30psi front and rear in the OEM supercorsa sps. Mainly "spirited" street riding. You MUST warm the tires up a good bit before pushing them at all or they are pretty darn slippery.
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