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Old July 23rd, 2019, 05:13 AM   #1
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1999 750SS not starting

Dear all: I am new to this forum and to working on motorcycles as all previous service was done at a service center.

I have had this motorcycle since new and never had any issues other than a dead battery. My battery dies again and this weekend I replaced it eager to go for a ride.

Now it doesn't start. The instrument cluster lights up, all lights, etc work, but the gas "empty" light is on (despite having fuel and I can't hear the familiar buzzing of the fuel pump.

I replaced the relay hoping for a simple fix, but to no avail. How do I remove/replace the fuel pump? All videos I found have access on the bottom. This one does not. Do I remove the entire fuel filler cap/ring to access the pump?

Any guidance/help will be much appreciated
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Old July 23rd, 2019, 02:32 PM   #2
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I have a 1998 900ss and its fuel pump is inside the tank at the bottom, and yes, you will have to remove the fuel filler ring to gain access. You should have replaced the fuel filter every 6k (I think) so this shouldn't be unfamiliar territory. It's not bad...you get gas on your hands.
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Old July 24th, 2019, 07:47 PM   #3
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Quote:
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I have a 1998 900ss and its fuel pump is inside the tank at the bottom, and yes, you will have to remove the fuel filler ring to gain access.
This.

The fuel filler comes out with like 3 bolts. Once out, you'll see the fill cap carrier ring. That is held in place by 8 stainless steel grub screws. Don't drop them in the tank as you remove them.



Once the carrier ring screws are removed, the only thing holding it in place is an o-ring. If the o-ring has become dried out, it will make the carrier ring difficult to remove. It will take significant force to pull the carrier ring out even if it isn't.






Above is the carrier ring removed from the tank. You can see the location of the grub screw holes. There is a weather gasket that prevents water from getting down in between the carrier ring and the tank bung. Replace it if it is broken or has a section missing. You can still get the parts on Ducati Omaha's site.






With the carrier removed, you have a rather large hole to access the pump and filter. The filter is visible above. The pump resides below the filter and is held in place by a spring like clamp in the bottom of the tank.



There is a filter sock on the suction end of the pump to keep any garbage out of the pump. You'll want to replace that as well as the pump and the outlet filter. That way, you don't have to get back inside the tank for the foreseeable future.



Don't drop the grub screws in, they're stainless steel. A magnet will NOT help you retrieve them if you do.



The carrier ring is difficult to remove. Significant force is required to remove it. Easier if the tank is off the bike as you can stand over it and exert more leverage. SIGNIFICANT force is required.



One last thing, there is a recessed groove in the tank bung where the grub screws are supposed to hold the carrier ring in place. Make sure the pointed end of the screws engages in the groove when you reassemble......Re-read the two above statements about the screws and the carrier ring. All I got.....Sean
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Old July 26th, 2019, 09:31 PM   #4
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close but the 99 model has about 8 tiny grub screws around the inside lip of the alloy filler section.
Buy a new o'ring is a great idea.

Remove the pump and take it to pep boys or NAPA if the gauze strainer is still ok. if you have time Amazon have the pumps for about 40 bucks.

You will pick up a pump for almost anything that will be the same, just open a box and look, use your old gauze.

Change the proper fuel filter at the same time.

Getting the filler back is a little bit tricky.. use snow white (petroleum) jelly on the o'ring and tank sides to press it back in.

These are not as easy as Nor cals images.

Use the search function for 900ss fuel pump or 1000ss fuel pump.

Long ago I had some pictures but buggered if I can find shit now...
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Old July 26th, 2019, 09:36 PM   #5
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should have read a little further into Nor cals post.

They are similar.

you will need to support the bike because the filler will be hardish to remove. Both hands, fingers inside and it will POP up.
Replacing I was using a block of 3x2 wood to try for an equal pressure getting it to sit back down.

If you don;t get the oring seated nice you will fill your crotch up with petrol first time you ride or fill it.

google videos in case
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Old August 4th, 2019, 10:54 AM   #6
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Dear all: Thanks for all the advise. I have now installed a new pump/filter, new spark plugs and flushed the clutch and the motorcycle started and I test drove it and it seemed to be fine. Yesterday on my way to a car show it started to "cough" and would rev up but not speed up. It died several times and I had to abort the trip.

I had changed the spark plugs for new ones, but didn't change the wires. So I assume the "coughing" could be due to this (old wires), but that would not explain the revving with no acceleration issue.

Any advise? Also, what is the correct part #/replacement part # for the spark plug wires? I can't seem to be able to locate a pair...

Once again, truly grateful.
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Old August 5th, 2019, 09:58 AM   #7
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coughing

At first blush it doesn't sound like an electrical issue but carburation. It sounds like the bike just doesn't want to accelerate which leads me to suspect clogged jets. Perhaps something passed into the carbs when you disturbed the pump and filter? It's kind of a pain, but it might be worth your while to remove the float bowl covers and check for sediment. Once the covers have been removed it's relatively easy to unscrew the main jet holders to check for any obstruction.
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Old August 6th, 2019, 05:22 AM   #8
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99 is injected.

You say it revs up but doesn’t accelerate. Are you riding at the time? Your symptoms just don’t make sense.
If your riding and it revs up without accelerating then the clutch is slipping.

If it’s free revving but won’t go under load it sound ignition.

If it’s coughing and spluttering it could be a number of things from water in the fuel to blocked air filters.

Could even be a blocked breather for the fuel tank.

You need to be a lot clearer in your symptoms. Just like I need to be clearer in what we need to know.
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Old August 6th, 2019, 05:26 AM   #9
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<— 98 snub nose 92-98 square headlights

08/98 —> later ie series , looks like the super mono.. wide headlight.
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Old August 6th, 2019, 08:54 AM   #10
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[QUOTE=Shrek;1220339]99 is injected.

I stand corrected!...I love a list providing useful information...I'd thought 900SS information exchange
a thing of the past. Wrong again.
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Old August 6th, 2019, 10:19 AM   #11
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Thank you all for your thoughts and suggestions. Maybe several things are failing at once, but I have to be honest and say, this took me so unprepared in a freeway, that I was more worried about my safety and probably less attentive to the symptoms. However, here is more info: this is a 1999 750SS. No previous mechanic issues ever. Stored in my garage for a long period. Changed fuel pump/filter, flushed clutch fluid (it was dark colored), test drove it. All OK. Took it out on the freeway and started "coughing". At one point it seemed to rev up without me opening the throttle. It died and I pushed it to an exit ramp. Put fresh gas in (thinking maybe a ran out of gas). It started and I headed home, but it did the same "coughing" and died several more times.

After reading your comments and watching some videos I am inclined to think that old gas might have clogged something. But this is an un-educated guess as I am by no stretch of the imagination a motorcycle mechanic.

With that said, I am handy and wonder if removing the carbs and doing some maintenance is (or should be) beyond a neophyte's purview.

If I was to tackle this, is there any reference (shop manual, etc.) I can consult? Are there any carb maintenance kits I can purchase?

Attached is an old photo for reference on the bike.

Once again, I am most grateful
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Old August 7th, 2019, 08:43 PM   #12
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I would agree it sounds like a carburetion issue. I dunno for sure though. Might be some other issue like a faulty ground or something along those lines.



As it is a 1999, that is the first year for that particular body style as well as several other systems that changed from the 1998 and older SuperSports.



Could be that the fuel is an issue, if the fuel in it was sitting for more than a couple of years, absolutely. It would gum up a number of things, like the carburetor fuel passages, jets...etc.



I'm not 100% sure, but I don't think you have an injected bike. If it is carbureted like I think it is, you might be better off outsourcing the carb work.



Send me a private message and I'll put you in touch with my carb guy. He's on your end of the nation too, so that might speed things up a bit....sean
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Old August 10th, 2019, 10:31 PM   #13
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No the 98 on supersports were injected. 98- 99monsters were still carbs.

Bad fuel or water in fuel might give odd running.

Could have buggered up the filter again, you did change it when you the pump I guess,

But these tanks were bad for rusting in the bottom corners, lots in the states rusted right through in the first 5 years or so. Would leak on the riders leg.
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Old August 11th, 2019, 12:17 PM   #14
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[QUOTE=Shrek;1220517]No the 98 on supersports were injected. 98- 99monsters were still carbs.

Hold on...my 98CR is running carbs. It has been my understanding that the 98FE had injection.
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Old August 11th, 2019, 07:18 PM   #15
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my 2001 SS 750 had a similar issue after it sat for years while waiting to put a new engine in it. In my case I wasn't getting proper voltage to the fuel pump. I only measured about 10 volts at the pump connector so I just undid every plug connector I could and cleaned then reassembled with white grease and that was it. Being a 20 year old bike it's worth trying right off the bat.
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