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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I had a low side in Dec. I replaced the stock Ducati clipons and bars with woodcraft. I had to take the damper off to take the top of the triple clamp off (to remove the stock clipons).

When reinstalling I ran in to a few questions.

#1
Its hard to know position for the clipons. It was much easier with the stocks because they had the roll pin :). I guess get em close and try to make them symmetrical right? Personal preference of course but I just want close to stock as I was used to it.

#2
When turning left my steering damper bottoms out before the steering stop. I don't know if it was like this before. Can't remember... Maybe its adjustment in the bracket for the damper? Also when I turn right I hit the steering stop which is good but I question how far is proper? What's too far?
This is a track only bike.
 

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It does not look right.
There is a tab underneat the front fairing bracket. you can see it from under and it has to be centered.
The bottom triple has also some adjusting screws mabe one is bent or miss adjusted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Turning right I hit the steering stop as expected. I could easily adjust the threads to decrease how far it turns right (if wanted).

Turning left is the issue, in that it seems that I hit the end of the damper throw. I followed the instructions in the manual and did 73mm. I google image search 1098s ohlins damper and I see it in many different positions. I would imagine if I moved the mount it would increase the throw. It looks like I have a good amount of rod still showing beyond when I turn right, so I would think it could be adjusted to compensate for turning left? Truly, I dont even remember where the mount was before I removed it all. I simply did it and followed the manual.
 

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There is a tiny 'grub screw' in the slideable clamp which grips the damper body. This should be backed off before the damper is moved through it. And only re-tighten the grub screw once the clamp screw is tightened.

There should be a witness mark from its original position on the damper body.

But if it IS in its original position you may have slightly bent your steering stop on the frame. Straightening this will involve some dismantling I'm afraid.

A small correction can be achieved cold, with care, but if it is seriously out you should dismantle the front end and use heat..

In the short term you may be able to simply adjust your steering stop screws. Either way, you need an equal clearance between fork tube and frame on both sides at full lock.

Once that is correct, you can use a similar method to get your handlebars equally positioned, with a measure from the tip of the 'bar to a reference point on the frame on R) and L) lock.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
There is a tiny 'grub screw' in the slideable clamp which grips the damper body. This should be backed off before the damper is moved through it. And only re-tighten the grub screw once the clamp screw is tightened.

There should be a witness mark from its original position on the damper body.

But if it IS in its original position you may have slightly bent your steering stop on the frame. Straightening this will involve some dismantling I'm afraid.

A small correction can be achieved cold, with care, but if it is seriously out you should dismantle the front end and use heat..

In the short term you may be able to simply adjust your steering stop screws. Either way, you need an equal clearance between fork tube and frame on both sides at full lock.

Once that is correct, you can use a similar method to get your handlebars equally positioned, with a measure from the tip of the 'bar to a reference point on the frame on R) and L) lock.
It's a race bike so there are no headlights or anything, the front cowl comes off in 10 seconds, simply 4 dzus and 2 zip ties. I was looking at the steering stop piece on the frame after the crash and visually (which is not a good indicator) it looked fine. It's totally possible I have the damper in the wrong (not original) spot. I'll look for a possible mark later. If I cant see one, then I may just adjust a bit and see where it gets me.

I will say that even when the bike was a street bike and in insanely pristine condition, I noticed that you could turn to the right (cant remember if it was this way to the left, I just remember the right because I was thinking "how the hell could I operate the throttle like this") so far that it pinches your hand and like I said, there's no way to even twist the throttle.

So here exactly should the steering stops be set to ideally? I guess a little less than where it is now may be good, and then get equal on the left.

:EDIT:
The crash was not too big. broke the left rear set peg off, mangled the SpeedyMoto spool sliders, messed up my race fairings and broke off the left clipon. I didn't even miss a session as they red flagged that one due to a different guy going down on the other side of the track at the same time, then broke for lunch. Swapped rear set, dropped in a new bar and I rode again 4 more sessions that day, zero issues. I ran over to my bike even righted it quickly, got on it and pushed it off in to the gravel. I couldnt see any real damage other than those things I broke off and a slight bend in the 2 tabs holding the left rear set. I straightened those with a bar easy enough.
 

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OK. To do this properly, you would have to set the steering stop screws equally, and get the frame stop dead centre, with equal clearance fork-to-frame on both sides.
As a track-only bike, and likely to get tossed, I would simply set the threaded stops on the lower tree to give you equal clearance between the fork and the frame on either side.
I set a fairly minimal clearance there, to reduce the famous Ducati A380 turning circle, but a track bike could probably use a little more, in case of accident. You don't want to dent your frame in a crash.
The difference in the setting of the stop screws will indicate the error in the frame stop, if indeed there is one.
I have a similar model to you. My steering damper has about 11 mms clearance between the damper body and the alloy shaft mount on left lock. And plenty of spare shaft on right lock.
But a picture can be worth a thousand words, so here you go!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the info.

I removed the bolt that holds the bar on and loosened the one main screw holding the bracket and simply slide it down more towards your area. it was easy. I have about 9mm i think inside, and about 17 on the outside. My steering stop piece on the frame looks symmetrical and straight in the front to the fairing stay. my steering stops themselves are really close to exactly the same, and it comes down to mm's in measuring and it's hard to say if it's user error or just this isnt thousandths of an inch kind of thing.. It seems really good to go now IMHO.

Thanks a lot.
 

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Good to hear you have got it sorted, and that your steering stop isn't bent.

Mild concern that you were able to slide your damper through its clamp without backing off the tiny grub screw (if I understand you correctly).

It is the small Allen head just below the damper-clamping bolt on the rear face of the clamp. It takes a 2 mm Allen key from memory.

Just make sure it is tight, as a significant shock through the steering could feasibly overcome the grip of the clamp if the grub screw isn't tightened.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Good call. Found that tiny one in the middle and tightened it up. It wasn't tight before. Weird. Also not listed in the workshop from what I saw. Oh well. Got it now. Thanks for your help
 
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