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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I've had my 600ss for about 2 months now and while it is a great bike and fun to ride, I'm starting to regret it.

I've been having weird starting problems. Turn the key to on, dash lights light up, in neutral, all good. Hit the starter, nothing. Try the same process again, nothing. Other days it starts fine first pop then randomly I'll run into this issue again.

I suspect the starter solenoid but I don't know how to locate it to check the terminals etc. any help would be appreciated.

Battery is not the case as it is brand new along with spark plugs
 

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I have covered this a couple of times lately for owners of '90s SS models. There are a couple of things you can do which should eliminate the problem. The circuit was not ideal on these models originally, and is now affected by time, which allows resistance to develop at crucial points.
Firstly you need to add a direct earth lead from the battery to the rear engine connection, just behind the crankcase breather, as well as the existing indirect earth leads.
If yours is a '95 onwards, it will probably have a black, finned 'non-fusible link' just behind the battery. These can give the sort of capricious failures you are experiencing. It can be eliminated, allowing direct connection to the starter solenoid, which is located under the RHS of the airbox.
Now you have located the solenoid, ensure that the light wires entering it (from the starter switch) have a good connection. On some models, after they moved the solenoid slightly, these were a bit short, and can have a variable connection in that little rectangular point they enter the solenoid.
If you carefully remove the connectors inside the non-fusible link (if your bike has one) the wires will be JUST long enough to reach the solenoid. You may need some help from an auto electrician to get this right, and to make up your new heavy battery leads.
Once you have a solid electrical supply to the system, you may also consider fitting stronger coils, such as Dyna or Bosch Transformers. The standard coils are weak, and now getting on a bit. Stronger coils will help the bike to start and idle better.
Good luck with it. Let us know how you went.
And welcome to the forum.
:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks a lot for putting it into terms I can understand haha. I have located the solenoid and the connector had a bit of corrosion so I sprayed some crc on it and it seems to have fixed the issue for now. Will talk to an auto sparky next week about getting this link removed and some fatter wires installed. Thanks a lot!
 

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I am not familiar with these specific coils, but I have no doubt they would be better than the originals - which are cheap Nippon Denso's shared with the mid-'80s GSX250 Suzuki, and other fairly uninspiring models. Not hard to beat, with outputs of only 16,000 - 17,000V.
If these coils get near their claim of voltage they will do the trick, and appear to be specifically appropriate for Ducatis like yours. You could always verify this with the supplier before purchasing, but I'm confident they will help your bike.
Voltage in excess of 20,000V helps these models starting and idling. The bike should feel that bit more crisp and willing with them.
It will permit you to run plugs with a cooler heat range (eg NGK 8s) as opposed to the 6s and 7s it probably needs to fire with the stock coils. This avoids hot spots in your combustion chamber on long runs, where hot plugs risk the piston crown.
Enjoy your bike. Hopefully it will behave now.

;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
New coils, ngk leads and cleaning corrosion from the solenoid connector sorted this problem! New battery leads would further increase power to solenoid but not nessecary
 
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