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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I'm new to this forum and new to bikes in general. I am just getting my license and looking to get a bike. I narrowed down to two bikes, Ducati Monster 696, and Triumph Street Triple.

I went to a local dealer here, and they said that when it comes to power, Street Triple will beat 696. They recommended to go for 796 instead of a 696.

I am new to bikes all together. I have no prior experience. I will be using the bike for everyday commute, which is less than 10 miles total. I will use this bike on weekends for fun rides. I am not a serious ride, but have this thing for bikes and would be a regular rider, no racer of any sort.

So far I'm leaning towards a monster instead of street triple, but now I'm not sure if 696 or 796 would be the right choice. I'm not a power rider, but safety on the road is a high concern.

Any recommendations appreciated.
Thanks
 

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Anyone who recommends a Street Triple (105 bhp!!!) to a beginner needs his head examined. My first bike is a 696, it gets me around commuting and having fun. Once you start getting into bigger bikes, you also need to deal with insurance costs, especially as a beginner. How tall are y ou?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Anyone who recommends a Street Triple (105 bhp!!!) to a beginner needs his head examined. My first bike is a 696, it gets me around commuting and having fun. Once you start getting into bigger bikes, you also need to deal with insurance costs, especially as a beginner. How tall are y ou?
I'm 5'6" - 135lbs

I tried the 696 and 796 at the local dealership. the 696 definitely felt more comfortable since it's slightly lower.

How much is it costing you to insure 696?
 

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Here's some tips for your purchase from someone who went through the same issues-
I had very limited time on two wheels with a motor but I raced mountain bikes for over a decade. I always wanted a Ducati so when I got some cash I put a deposit down on an 848 evo corse. I borrowed a friend's bike for a while and found out that my pending purchase was way out of my league. I picked up a 696 with a blown motor (cheap!!) and rebuilt it for my first official Duc. The 696 was still alot of bike to try to learn on. I actaully got into building bikes from peices and by the time my 848 came in, it would be my fourth Ducati.

So here's what I found-
It's not the power that will kill you, it's the brakes. Sport bikes have great binders on them and any stress reaction that has you touching brakes at the wrong time will have you eating pavement.
Yes, the power will kill you too. Even a monster 696 with it's hamster powered 80 hp motor is still a sub 400 lb bikethat will get you in trouble quickly. It's not the big striaghts at speed that get you, its the corners. The concept/feeling that speed on a motorcycle vs in a car give you an entirely different experience and without lots of time, that relationship isn't second nature.
Again with the corners. If you corner on a bike like you do in a car you will not have a pretty bike for long. It is a different skill with less forgiveness for hamfisted movements. Take an MSF course, read proficient motorcycling and twist of the wrist two. then re read the books untill you have them memorized.

Now back to the bikes-
Duc's are stupid expesive. I'm not whining abour the msrp or the service cost; just giving you a heads up that if you have a little lowside and scratch it up, the cost of parts and labor will easily total a bike with cosmetic damage.

My best advice if you absolutely have to have a duc for your first bike-Buy the best helmet you can find that fits your head, get a high quality two piece leather set and gloves (Ricondi is great, contact TheRedBaron for details). Get a decent set of boots that fit your feet. (always get quality that fits your body regardless of the manufacturer). Once you have your gear, got your instruction course, read your books- then:
find a nice, clean, used (even salavaged title) 620, 695, or 696 monster. Put frame, fork, axle, bar end and case sliders on it. Make sure it is well maintained and has good tires. Ride the wheels off it! Learn to ride it, learn to maintain it, learn to enjoy it. Once you have made your newbie mistakes, then get the pretty bike with the dealer tags. It wil be a more rewarding experience because it will reduce the financial wories of making mistakes on the road and in the garage while you are new. You might just find that even when you get a pretty new bike, your old beater is still a favorite ride.

When you do get the new bike- get the 796. the single sided swing arm makes maintainence and tire changes so much easier. It will also have a better resale value given the better components and swingarm set up. I still have a 696 myself, but I converted the swingarm over (among many other mods).

also: Please ride with friends that will go slow to help develop your safe riding pratices, and not clowns that will be pushing you past your limits.
 

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I'm 5'6" - 135lbs

I tried the 696 and 796 at the local dealership. the 696 definitely felt more comfortable since it's slightly lower.

How much is it costing you to insure 696?
It's costing me about seven hundred per year through GEICO. But I have multiple vehicles and other stuff on my insurance, and I have a perfect driving record.

Yes, dropping a 696 will cost you :****fan:. I suggest if you get one, have the dealer install frame sliders as a minimum. It cost me $750 in parts and labor just to get my bike in rideable condition after I dropped it in the parking lot a 10 mph. It's costing me a few hundred more to take care of the cosmetics. If I filed a claim with the insurance company, they would have totaled the bike.

I love how 80 hp is hamster powered.
 

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I love how 80 hp is hamster powered.
it was in comparison to a superbike or the triumph..:) I find myself waiting to accel while at WOT on the 696, especially after riding the s2r1k or 848. It's still faster than almost any cage I've driven (I've driven an SLR and and SLS), and way faster that my daily driver wrx.
 

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Here's some tips for your purchase from someone who went through the same issues-
I had very limited time on two wheels with a motor but I raced mountain bikes for over a decade. I always wanted a Ducati so when I got some cash I put a deposit down on an 848 evo corse. I borrowed a friend's bike for a while and found out that my pending purchase was way out of my league. I picked up a 696 with a blown motor (cheap!!) and rebuilt it for my first official Duc. The 696 was still alot of bike to try to learn on. I actaully got into building bikes from peices and by the time my 848 came in, it would be my fourth Ducati.

So here's what I found-
It's not the power that will kill you, it's the brakes. Sport bikes have great binders on them and any stress reaction that has you touching brakes at the wrong time will have you eating pavement.
Yes, the power will kill you too. Even a monster 696 with it's hamster powered 80 hp motor is still a sub 400 lb bikethat will get you in trouble quickly. It's not the big striaghts at speed that get you, its the corners. The concept/feeling that speed on a motorcycle vs in a car give you an entirely different experience and without lots of time, that relationship isn't second nature.
Again with the corners. If you corner on a bike like you do in a car you will not have a pretty bike for long. It is a different skill with less forgiveness for hamfisted movements. Take an MSF course, read proficient motorcycling and twist of the wrist two. then re read the books untill you have them memorized.

Now back to the bikes-
Duc's are stupid expesive. I'm not whining abour the msrp or the service cost; just giving you a heads up that if you have a little lowside and scratch it up, the cost of parts and labor will easily total a bike with cosmetic damage.

My best advice if you absolutely have to have a duc for your first bike-Buy the best helmet you can find that fits your head, get a high quality two piece leather set and gloves (Ricondi is great, contact TheRedBaron for details). Get a decent set of boots that fit your feet. (always get quality that fits your body regardless of the manufacturer). Once you have your gear, got your instruction course, read your books- then:
find a nice, clean, used (even salavaged title) 620, 695, or 696 monster. Put frame, fork, axle, bar end and case sliders on it. Make sure it is well maintained and has good tires. Ride the wheels off it! Learn to ride it, learn to maintain it, learn to enjoy it. Once you have made your newbie mistakes, then get the pretty bike with the dealer tags. It wil be a more rewarding experience because it will reduce the financial wories of making mistakes on the road and in the garage while you are new. You might just find that even when you get a pretty new bike, your old beater is still a favorite ride.

When you do get the new bike- get the 796. the single sided swing arm makes maintainence and tire changes so much easier. It will also have a better resale value given the better components and swingarm set up. I still have a 696 myself, but I converted the swingarm over (among many other mods).

also: Please ride with friends that will go slow to help develop your safe riding pratices, and not clowns that will be pushing you past your limits.
What he said!
 

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A lot of good advice there. (And welcome back you guys!).

Don't get too overwhelmed by all the advice/info. Starting out carefully is the shot.

Be realistic about what you can afford. As Eric says, a minor incident with a new bike can break your heart if you're stretched to buy it.

Starting out with a second-hand one has a lot of advantages. Depends a lot on how mechanical you are, and how much you can afford to spend.

Remembering that service costs can be significant on these things. And good helmet and gear costs need to be factored into the decision.

Hope you end up loving motorcycling as much as we do!

:D
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Here's some tips for your purchase from someone who went through the same issues-
I had very limited time on two wheels with a motor but I raced mountain bikes for over a decade. I always wanted a Ducati so when I got some cash I put a deposit down on an 848 evo corse. I borrowed a friend's bike for a while and found out that my pending purchase was way out of my league. I picked up a 696 with a blown motor (cheap!!) and rebuilt it for my first official Duc. The 696 was still alot of bike to try to learn on. I actaully got into building bikes from peices and by the time my 848 came in, it would be my fourth Ducati.

So here's what I found-
It's not the power that will kill you, it's the brakes. Sport bikes have great binders on them and any stress reaction that has you touching brakes at the wrong time will have you eating pavement.
Yes, the power will kill you too. Even a monster 696 with it's hamster powered 80 hp motor is still a sub 400 lb bikethat will get you in trouble quickly. It's not the big striaghts at speed that get you, its the corners. The concept/feeling that speed on a motorcycle vs in a car give you an entirely different experience and without lots of time, that relationship isn't second nature.
Again with the corners. If you corner on a bike like you do in a car you will not have a pretty bike for long. It is a different skill with less forgiveness for hamfisted movements. Take an MSF course, read proficient motorcycling and twist of the wrist two. then re read the books untill you have them memorized.

Now back to the bikes-
Duc's are stupid expesive. I'm not whining abour the msrp or the service cost; just giving you a heads up that if you have a little lowside and scratch it up, the cost of parts and labor will easily total a bike with cosmetic damage.

My best advice if you absolutely have to have a duc for your first bike-Buy the best helmet you can find that fits your head, get a high quality two piece leather set and gloves (Ricondi is great, contact TheRedBaron for details). Get a decent set of boots that fit your feet. (always get quality that fits your body regardless of the manufacturer). Once you have your gear, got your instruction course, read your books- then:
find a nice, clean, used (even salavaged title) 620, 695, or 696 monster. Put frame, fork, axle, bar end and case sliders on it. Make sure it is well maintained and has good tires. Ride the wheels off it! Learn to ride it, learn to maintain it, learn to enjoy it. Once you have made your newbie mistakes, then get the pretty bike with the dealer tags. It wil be a more rewarding experience because it will reduce the financial wories of making mistakes on the road and in the garage while you are new. You might just find that even when you get a pretty new bike, your old beater is still a favorite ride.

When you do get the new bike- get the 796. the single sided swing arm makes maintainence and tire changes so much easier. It will also have a better resale value given the better components and swingarm set up. I still have a 696 myself, but I converted the swingarm over (among many other mods).

also: Please ride with friends that will go slow to help develop your safe riding pratices, and not clowns that will be pushing you past your limits.
I highly appreciate you sharing your experience. I've been doing ALOT of research and not rushing into any decision soon.

Before moving further, I must say, it's hard to find any other bike that has the appeal of ducati monster. Nothing seems to come close so far.

Having said that, I've started looking for alternatives. I definitely feel you when you said that if I drop a brand new monster, it will be heart breaking.

I will make the right choice in the end, but nothing else will satisfy the urge or style of a ducati.
 

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Anyone who recommends a Street Triple (105 bhp!!!) to a beginner needs his head examined. My first bike is a 696, it gets me around commuting and having fun. Once you start getting into bigger bikes, you also need to deal with insurance costs, especially as a beginner. How tall are y ou?
how so?? a 696 is not that much different, especially in torque. my first bike was a 600cc I4 that had about 90-100 hp. i did just fine and within a year I moved on to an 1198...still alive a couple of years later as it turns out :rolleyes:

a street triple would be a great bike for a beginner, just take it easy like others suggested
 

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how so?? a 696 is not that much different, especially in torque. my first bike was a 600cc I4 that had about 90-100 hp. i did just fine and within a year I moved on to an 1198...still alive a couple of years later as it turns out :rolleyes:

a street triple would be a great bike for a beginner, just take it easy like others suggested
The 696 has 80 hp at the crank, 64 hp at the wheel. How tall are YOU?
 

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The 696 has 80 hp at the crank, 64 hp at the wheel. How tall are YOU?
Not sure what your point is here and what my height has anything to do with it...
 

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Hi,

I'm new to this forum and new to bikes in general. I am just getting my license and looking to get a bike. I narrowed down to two bikes, Ducati Monster 696, and Triumph Street Triple.

I went to a local dealer here, and they said that when it comes to power, Street Triple will beat 696. They recommended to go for 796 instead of a 696.

I am new to bikes all together. I have no prior experience. I will be using the bike for everyday commute, which is less than 10 miles total. I will use this bike on weekends for fun rides. I am not a serious ride, but have this thing for bikes and would be a regular rider, no racer of any sort.

So far I'm leaning towards a monster instead of street triple, but now I'm not sure if 696 or 796 would be the right choice. I'm not a power rider, but safety on the road is a high concern.

Any recommendations appreciated.
Thanks
None!

And don't get mad with my comment.

But with no previous riding experience , getting any of those bikes is asking for trouble. Sooner or later, you will drop the bike and will cost you hundreds of dollars to repair.

Get a Ninja 250cc or any used similar bike, even a 600cc bike or similar, but NOT new. That will give you the confidence you need.

Sell it after 6 months or so and do a actual test ride. Check ergonomics and buy the one you like.

I owned a Street Triple, after 5 years riding, and that bike has lot of power.

I tested ride a Monster too. While not as quick as the ST, it can kill you easily if you're not careful. But the thing is that dropping or scratching the Monster will cost you big bucks, so you better be careful while you learn , in case you get a new one.

This is just my personal opinion, of course.
 

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a 696 and a street triple have 50 lb-ft of torque. yes, you're right in the top range, the Triumph has a higher peak power....but the numbers you see are all for marketing use. you have to see comparative dyno graphs comparing the power of the 2 bikes. you'll see the monster may in fact have about the same amount of power up until 8k-9k rpm after which the triumph tops it (just a guess). That's what matters because honestly, how often do people on street triples ride around town reving over 10k rpm?? lol

anyway, like I said, I've seen plenty of people (myself included) who started on 600s which are more dangerous and did just fine. The Street Triple is a great beginner's bike. Also in the world of sport bikes bigger bikes are not necessarily better for tall people. I'm 5'10" and I feel a little too big on my 1198. Most sport bikes are designed for shorter people (5'7"-5'10"), because being too tall can hinder your ability to handle the bike well. Have you ever seen a 6'5" guy on a sport bike?? It's a pretty funny sight to see LOL
 

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I would agree with what I think eric said. He's forgotten a lot of stuff about these bikes than I will know without lots and lots and lots of studying. But a used smaller Ducati like a 696 would be best I think. But the whole which bike should be my first is really a lot more complicated then people make it out to be, so let me explain.....

I took the MSF course in May of 2012. I bought a new 796 in June 2012. It's the first bike I've ever owned, and the MSF was the first time I ever rode a motorcycle. It's winter here, so I've had a lot of time to think about things. If I had the money, I would trade for the Streetfighter 848.

The things to consider when buying a new bike isn't just experience. How well can you mentally multitask? Can you and will you remember while riding such a joyous machine, to ALWAYS to check in front of you, behind you, beside you, what's on the road, try to predict whats ahead? Are you clumsy? Do you panic easily or always clear calm and collected? Are you well coordinated? Each hand and each foot is doing something different always while your head and eyes is always forward but always around. The more power you have, the less forgiving life will be on any of your shortcomings in ability, mentally and physically.

So what I mean by this is, buy a cheap Ducati and learn on it. If everything goes well, and you are very sorted mentally and physically, you'll want a more powerful bike in 1 year most likely. And unless you have a good deal more money than I do. It's hard to afford new bikes every year.

That's the best advice I can give, in the short time I've been doing this.
 

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I was in the same situation as you. I bought the 796 as my first bike. I didn't ride it to work until a week after I bought. And that was after constant practice going around the block.(and running out of gas) Mind you I work about 23 miles from were I live, and It was white knuckle all the way there.

But you will get used to it pretty fast.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Thanks for all your suggestions and advice. I really appreciate it.

I took the MSF course and got my license :D
During the course, I had a chance to ride 125cc and 250cc bikes. though riding both of them at 15mph and only 1st or 2nd gear, it didn't feel very different. However, after much deliberation and suggestions, I think I will reserve the monster as my second bike. For now I will find another cheap naked bike that I like and practice on it.
I feel confident about my riding, because I will practice extensively before going on the road, but the cost of maintaining a ducati as first bike may be a stretch for me, because I may not physically drop the bike, but I assume I will do some damage to the engine while practicing.

Also, after many suggestions, if I'm going to grow up from 250cc bike very soon, it doesn't seem right to invest same amount of money in such a bike. I can get a used ninja 650 for around $3000, and get a 600cc bike for around $3500.

So I've started looking around for alternatives. So far Suzuki SFV650 is looking interesting. Probably most users on this forum will be a ducati users, but what would be a good alternative naked bike to ducati?

Having said that, again, nothing like a ducati monster. :D
 
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