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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys, i need an advice from you...i currently own a triumph street triple 675 which was unfortunately a bad purchase....can't get any feeling from the front tire, neither at low or high speed. The engine is cool, but riding position and ergonomics don't fit for me.

I'm selling my bike and planning to get back to the supersport type of riding, which I earlier enjoyed (aprilia rs 125)...the question is: daytona or 848?

My use of the bike is 25 % track, 15 % city, 60 % street riding outside town (which involves both short trips [around 200 miles] and some longer trips lasting a few days, including winter...when it's snowing everything has got a touch of magic).

My riding: on track i obviously look for my limits...but on the streets i like to enjoy the surroundings more than racing. I'm quite a calm biker on the road, so i don't need 564134 rpms because i just don't use them...if the street allows it, i sure make a couple of bends in the way they're meant to be...but 80% of the times on public road i go for relaxed riding.

Both bikes are wonderful and i can't get any final decision!
Sometimes i'd go for the duc:
more torque, better details, perfect for track, it's a ducati and it looks like a diamond but sounds like a bull :yo:

Other times i'd go for the triumph:
smoother engine (i know it well), easier (?) to ride, a little bit more comfy, cheaper buy, cool sound over 9k rpms, less effort in riding on broken/degradated streets (i fear the duc would be a bit too harsh on mountain roads that here in italy are often full of holes and dirt)

What do you think? Shall I follow my ducati heart or my 3cilinders head? :confused:
 

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I would recommend going and sitting on an 848 for a few minutes to see how your body fits on it. I've ridden both bikes and the 675 is very cramped for my build. The 848 feels like a Recarro seat in a Porsche 911. It hugs me in comfort.

The pull of the v-twin and sound is very intoxicating. Coming form I4's, I won't go back. I still own 4 I4's and none have been ridden since I got the 848 in 08.

The 848 will need some suspension massaging to really use it to it's fullest on a track but she'll reward you with rock solid cornering and fantastic stability at full throttle.
 

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Welcome to the forum!

First off, you live in Milan and DON'T have a Ducati? Where have you been all these years! LOL :)

The Daytona 675 and the Ducati 848 are actually very similar in many ways. Both are the bigger brothers of the middleweight classes with more midrange then their 600 counterparts. Neither one comes with a slipper clutch, neither one is very comfortable on the street, they both have the same geometry issues which are easily resolved, plus they compete in the same racing classes. Pricing is also very similar, making the challenge of deciding even more difficult.

At first glance, the Daytona is a very pretty bike, especially the pearl white version. Underneath, it's made like a Japanese bike. Lots of "after thoughts" and loose cabling all over the place. Its sad to be so impressed with the outside and be so unimpressed with the inside. Plus, the stock wheels are those heavy cast things, they're ugly and so damn heavy. However, most people just ride the thing and on the street it's not bad. It has smooth easy to handle power, the pretty much flat seat isn't too uncomfortable either. The riding position stock is for sure something you could adapt to easily and be OK with stock. The thinner tank/chassis is very nice, but it still feels like a Japanese bike in many ways, especially at higher RPM's when it screams just like an inline 4. You do need to keep the RPM's up because it has a long rev range and most of the power is near the top.

At first glance, the Ducati 848 is also a very pretty bike, I also dig the pearl white version. Underneath however, it's very well made. Ducati do a fantastic job making the bikes pretty simple and easy to work on, which is nice. Everything has it's place and there is no "mess" anywhere. On the street, the curved seat is annoying, under breaking it can slam your balls into the tank if you aren't bracing. It also gets very hot, much hotter then the Triumph. This heat is probably one of the bike's most difficult things to resolve because you can't really control it. Even with the fan's at full tick, the bike radiates heat not just from in front of the rider, but from under the seat due to the catalytic converters being located in the canisters. The power delivery is a bit rougher then the inline triple, but that's to be expected no matter what twin you have. It loves lower-RPM riding, the power starts at 4k and it could cruse at 6k all day long and be plenty powerful and happy. The 848 also feels like an Italian bike, complete polar opposite of the Daytona 675, it's amazing both bikes are in the same class, let alone the same galaxy, they feel SO far apart to ride.

Stock, both bikes need the same modifications; rear sets, comfort seat and perhaps clip on's depending on body type. Do those very minor creature comfort things and your body will thank you every time you swing a leg over.

On the track, things get messy. Stock, neither bike is setup well for track, even though they both claim to be designed for the track. The lack of slipper clutch on both bike's kinda ruins the experience right away. Both have understeer and neither really want's to turn at high speeds. They drive wide on corner exit and stability is a huge problem on the Daytona. Part of the stability issue is due to the stock steering stabilizer being shit, it can really head shake on you, which can get unnerving. The Ducati on the other hand, always feels planted, it always just goes where you look, which is nice. The 848 doesn't even come with a stabilizer and it doesn't appear to need it. With some modifications, both bikes turn into amazing track weapon's, totally 360 degree's from what they're like stock. Having done numerous back to back track tests with a full race-prepped 848 and Daytona 675R with the same tires, I must admit the heavily modified 675R is a better bike then the 848. The Daytona isn't quite as fast, but the chassis is so good, that trumps any issues the engine has.

In summary for the occasional track day and fun in the canyon's, BOTH bikes are a joy to ride. The Daytona has a upper hand on the creature comfort's stock, but you can fix those issues on the Ducati very easily. The Ducati has an upper hand on cruising around RPM's, the amazing sound and of course the fact you're riding a piece of history. So it's a real tough choice… but if I were in your shoes, I'd buy the 848, mainly because you won't regret it.
 

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La Ducati 848 è una bella motocicletta. Sono ragionevolmente prezzo e mantenere ottime recensioni da vari proprietari nel corso degli anni. Il V-twin esperienza offre una buona potenza e tonnellate di coppia in ogni marcia. La gestione è di altissimo livello. Questi motocicli sono più sexy quando si tratta di stile a mio parere. Esse richiedono maggiore manutenzione il Daytona, in modo essere preparati per spendere un paio di dollari ogni anno. Problemi con queste motociclette sono minime, ma tenere il loro valore nel tempo. Per me la decisione è la Ducati.

Sarebbe stato lì World Ducati Week 2014
 

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Motorbikes decisions are not predicated upon practicality. You're trying to convince yourself to hop on the Triumph, the bike you should get.

But it's not the bike you want.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I just sat on the 848 at the ducati dealer. Besides the fantastic people that work there and their amazing way of relation with the customer, i loved it. I thought it would have been worse, but the large clipons are not that uncomfortable as they may seem. Rear pegs were at the correct height, and for what I could notice there the riding position was ok, maybe just a bit longer than i expected. However, nothing that i can't get used to in a couple of weeks riding.
Now i'm looking for a daytona to make a comparison because last time i sat on it it was a year ago and the only thing i remember was the stiffness of the suspensions of the R version, and the narrow clipons that were also very "closed" towards the tank.

However, i forgot to add that i'll buy used bikes because new ones are too expensive (and instead of 12k euros for a new 848 i'd go for a used 899 at 12.5k :naughty:). My current budget is around 8500 euros, which are enough for almost any daytona (old model, i don't like the new one) and the 848EVO with less than 8k miles.

@tuned: my dad owns a hyper 1100s with termignoni exhaust, air filter and map adjusting...he's ben telling me since he bought it: "every bike is cool, because bikes are cool. But try my ducati, look at these details, see how it feels. That's why you should buy a ducati. It's just THE bike".

I was 16 and didn't understand then, too young and restricted license...I never considered ducati since then, i made up my mind thinking that they were too expensive, just look and no substance, and so on...and i went for the street triple at 18, because it was the most reasonable choice for my use of the bike. I made a mistake :mad:

A month ago we went to a ducati dealer because he is thinking about switching the hyper for the new multistrada DVT. I fell in love with the bikes. The color, the feeling, everything got stuck in my heart, and now i have this kind of bug in my head that keeps telling me: ducati! ducati! ducati! :heart:
 

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Yeah......I feel you!! I was in love with the GSXR ever since it came to be in 1985. I bought my first one (86 Limited 750) in 88 and still have it. I bought an 89 Limited in 91 (still have that one also) and from there it was a regular 90 750, 94 750, 98 750, 2002 750 and finally a 2005 600 (still have that one also) and I modified it and all that jazz.

I always coveted the Duc's but between the $22,000 price tag for a 748, then the $24,000 for the 749 (I'm using base model small ones as the larger bikes were even more expensive) and the fact that they weren't Japanese reliable and cost way more to service and had to be done twice as much......practicality won and bang for the buck was always first and foremost.

Fast forward to 2008.......the 848 comes out at the paltry sum of $15,995 (price of playing up in Canada) and the cost of ownership has drastically been cut, service intervals time is doubled and service amount has been cut almost in half. Bikes are a lot more reliable too. I went in to purchase a passenger seat for my GSXR 600 (I converted the whole back end to 2004 GSXR 1000 items), sat on the 848 and pulled out the pocket book. Picked it up the next day and never rode the GSXR again.

91,000K later, it's the only bike I've ever owned that actually nags at me to take it for a ride!!

I like the Triumph 675 series and have a couple friends who own various models and years of it. I've had the fun of riding them and like the I4's, they just don't do it for me. The 675 feels tall yet cramped and narrow at the bars but wider at the tank. It feels funny to me.
 

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Picture worth a 1000 words....just sayin.... :)
 
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Lol! To be fair that's a good friend on the Triumph that wanted me to step down to I-group and lead/follow him. One of my main goals for this season is to help get him confident and skilled enough to be bumped to A. He's on an F3 800 now (which is a pretty nicely done bike, I must say....and shame on Triumph for not making an 800-1000cc I3'd Daytona first), so there's a bit of an uphill battle for him to overcome the "expensive bike + potential of a whoops = I'll die if I yard sale this thing" feelings he has when he's on track on the F3....
 

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Mmmmmm yes the F3 800 is a bike I'd love to have sex....errrrrrrr I mean ride around a track.

I had the bin it blues my first track day on the 848 but I soon realized that the bike could be ridden about 95% and still be soooooo much fun and quick in a middle group. I've had track experience since 1985 so I wasn't itching to prove myself or find the limits on the bike. Maybe it's why I never ran in to the real suspension troubles that the hard core guys find with geometry.
 

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Even 95% is actually a lot. Most of the racers say they run at 95% during a race...otherwise if they go to 100%, but they can't make that last for more than 2-3 laps.
 

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@tuned: my dad owns a hyper 1100s with termignoni exhaust, air filter and map adjusting...he's ben telling me since he bought it: "every bike is cool, because bikes are cool. But try my ducati, look at these details, see how it feels. That's why you should buy a ducati. It's just THE bike".
Very kool, those HM1100's with exhausts are so awesome. They not only look good, they not only sound good, but they are actually a BOAT load of fun to ride. Not quite what I'd consider a track bike, but around town and in the twisties, very few bikes are better.
 

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I had the bin it blues my first track day on the 848 but I soon realized that the bike could be ridden about 95% and still be soooooo much fun and quick in a middle group. I've had track experience since 1985 so I wasn't itching to prove myself or find the limits on the bike. Maybe it's why I never ran in to the real suspension troubles that the hard core guys find with geometry.
I'll be the first person to admit, we all love adding bits to make our bikes better, but in reality most of us just need seat time. These bikes out of the box are fully capable of pulling quickest lap time at any track day, with the right pilot of course. The difference is, when you add the bits (especially the slipper clutch) it makes the bike much easier to ride, the rider doesn't need to work as hard, so more laps can be performed without the same loss of energy. ;)
 

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Like Ducati's test rider doing a 1:55 at Mugello on a STOCK 1299...sure Troy Bayliss has done low 50s there, but that was on a WSBK championship winning Ducati (1098R)...and it's Troy Fuckin Bayliss. For a stock 1299 with what I'm guessing was also the stock tires....not too shabby.
 

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Like Ducati's test rider doing a 1:55 at Mugello on a STOCK 1299...sure Troy Bayliss has done low 50s there, but that was on a WSBK championship winning Ducati (1098R)...and it's Troy Fuckin Bayliss. For a stock 1299 with what I'm guessing was also the stock tires....not too shabby.
Don't forget, the Panigale is the first Ducati sportbike to ever have the proper geometry out of the box! Plus all the electronic aids which make even Troy's 1098F08 WSBK championship winning superbike, look antiquated.
 

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@Desmo94, it sounds like you've already made up your mind. It seems like you're trying to justify a Daytona while yearning for an 848...life's too short for compromises, go with the 848. I've been riding one for 3 years and it's been easy to live with. It's stood up to daily commuter routines, dealt with the crappy roads here in Spain and even made the trek all the way from Cadiz to Valencia and back with no issues, so that shows is can still be used for the daily grind. Don't get me wrong, the 675 is an outstanding bike (I talked my buddy out of a CBR600 for a 675 and he was thankful I did that) and I enjoyed taking my buddy's out, but it's still not the same; it lacks the visual appeal, the way the exhaust stirs your soul, the way strangers wave and give you a thumbs up when you're going down the street, there's few bikes like a Ducati and I assure you that you won't regret purchasing one.
 

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@Desmo94, it sounds like you've already made up your mind. It seems like you're trying to justify a Daytona while yearning for an 848...life's too short for compromises, go with the 848. I've been riding one for 3 years and it's been easy to live with. It's stood up to daily commuter routines, dealt with the crappy roads here in Spain and even made the trek all the way from Cadiz to Valencia and back with no issues, so that shows is can still be used for the daily grind. Don't get me wrong, the 675 is an outstanding bike (I talked my buddy out of a CBR600 for a 675 and he was thankful I did that) and I enjoyed taking my buddy's out, but it's still not the same; it lacks the visual appeal, the way the exhaust stirs your soul, the way strangers wave and give you a thumbs up when you're going down the street, there's few bikes like a Ducati and I assure you that you won't regret purchasing one.
How is it that you guys have such crappy roads in Spain, but have some of the best race tracks in the world?? :eek:
 

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Well rubbish, me thinks they just spend all the money on the tracks and let the roads continue to wither away. Personally, I'm willing to accept this compromise.
 
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