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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I bought a 2008 Ducati 1098 sight-unseen that was left sitting in the original owners garage with 2k miles. After hauling it home and giving it a quick rinse, the bike looks like it just came off the production line. Unfortunately, it was not stored properly. My best guess it was on the side stand with a quarter tank of fuel for 8 years or more. Question is, what would you do? This was a very unexpected pickup as I had already recently purchased a bike, but this deal was too good to pass up. It will likely sit a bit longer until I can get around to working on it. Should I just clean out the old fuel and cross my fingers with some fresh go juice or would that be too naive? I am new to working on Ducati 1098 and am not sure what potential pitfalls await. I plan to replace all fluids, but I am not sure if I should be doing any serious internal inspections before turning her over. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
 

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I would definitely pull the tank and let it dry out and hope it's not swollen. The belts would be next on my list after sitting for that long.
 

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The injectors will most likely be clogged. Easy to clean with a 9V battery, syringe, some plastic tubing and acetone. Otherwise, yes replace all fluids. Inspect/clean tank and fuel lines. It's worthwhile to upgrade the starter wiring and main ground. Timing belts need replacing too. New battery of course. Keep an eye out for degraded rubber components and wiring. Fork and rear shock fluid may need changing, along with new seals.

Hey put up some photos for interest's sake.
 

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The injectors will most likely be clogged. Easy to clean with a 9V battery, syringe, some plastic tubing and acetone. Otherwise, yes replace all fluids. Inspect/clean tank and fuel lines. It's worthwhile to upgrade the starter wiring and main ground. Timing belts need replacing too. New battery of course. Keep an eye out for degraded rubber components and wiring. Fork and rear shock fluid may need changing, along with new seals.

Hey put up some photos for interest's sake.
I have seen many use a similar setup with carb cleaner. Do you think acetone is better?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I would definitely pull the tank and let it dry out and hope it's not swollen. The belts would be next on my list after sitting for that long.
Thanks for the quick response! When you say swollen tank, would this be obvious damage or could it be subtle? And what are possible solutions?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The injectors will most likely be clogged. Easy to clean with a 9V battery, syringe, some plastic tubing and acetone. Otherwise, yes replace all fluids. Inspect/clean tank and fuel lines. It's worthwhile to upgrade the starter wiring and main ground. Timing belts need replacing too. New battery of course. Keep an eye out for degraded rubber components and wiring. Fork and rear shock fluid may need changing, along with new seals.

Hey put up some photos for interest's sake.
Thanks for the quick response! I appreciate the heads up on th injectors, I figure they will likely need to be addressed. Can you point me in the direction of any resources you have for the cleaning procedure you speak of? I will do my best to document this project due to your interest. Thanks again
 

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Thanks for the quick response! I appreciate the heads up on th injectors, I figure they will likely need to be addressed. Can you point me in the direction of any resources you have for the cleaning procedure you speak of? I will do my best to document this project due to your interest. Thanks again
Yes please document!

Have a look at the photo. Start by joining the back of the injector up to the syringe starting with a large diameter plastic tube, then fit into it a smaller one, then a smaller one, until you get to the diameter of the syringe. Make sure everything is air tight and the ends are clamped down well. I used thinners on mine. Fill the syringe partially and work the plunger back and forth to loosen any internal muck before hooking the battery. Drain, then fill partially again. Now, load up pressure on the plunger and zap the connector to your battery (the injector has + and - marked, very easy) - you should get a good burst of thinners. Do it a couple times. Don't hold the charge open too long - the injectors are designed to work in bursts only.

172274


Look up Practical Enthusiast on YT. He recently got a 1198S and covers his service work. I hear some of the model years also received a bad batch of rec/regs. Keep an eye on your charge.
 

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Thanks for the quick response! When you say swollen tank, would this be obvious damage or could it be subtle? And what are possible solutions?
Swollen tanks were a recall item. If yours is misshapen or has small bumps you should contact a dealer, any dealer, to see if it is still covered. You might also want to do a search for any other recalls for that model.
 

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So I bought a 2008 Ducati 1098 sight-unseen that was left sitting in the original owners garage with 2k miles. After hauling it home and giving it a quick rinse, the bike looks like it just came off the production line. Unfortunately, it was not stored properly. My best guess it was on the side stand with a quarter tank of fuel for 8 years or more. Question is, what would you do? This was a very unexpected pickup as I had already recently purchased a bike, but this deal was too good to pass up. It will likely sit a bit longer until I can get around to working on it. Should I just clean out the old fuel and cross my fingers with some fresh go juice or would that be too naive? I am new to working on Ducati 1098 and am not sure what potential pitfalls await. I plan to replace all fluids, but I am not sure if I should be doing any serious internal inspections before turning her over. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
I bought an 07 with a swollen tank back around 2014. The tank was not deformed in any noticible way but had grown in length by about a quarter inch. When I removed the tank to replace a bad fuel level sensor the rear mounting bracket was bent and the bolt hole of the tank no longer lined up with the hole in the frame. I was able to buy an adjustible bracket to replace the bent one and the adjustment allowed it to match up with the longer tank.

There was a class action suit settlement on the swollen tank issue and for 6 years Ducati agreed to replace deformed tanks with an aluminum one. Howver for me I missed the 6 year cut off by a few months so I was on my own. I coated the inside of the tank with a sealing product to prevent any further swelling and had no further problems
 
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