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I laid down my S4RS and highsided because I stomped on my rear brake going through a moutain road at excessive speed. Having ridden an older Honda for some time I was used to relying on the rear brake in panic situations more than I should since the fronts didn't work worth a damn... well compared to the Ducati fronts.
Now I use my fronts exclusively applying it with one or at most two fingers. After putting close to 30K on my Ducs I'm very comfortable with this practice on the track as well as on the road.
 

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Ok, so what happens when you make that panic stop and successfully avoid the car that pulled out from you but the guy behind you isn't quite as fast at stopping? Now you are at a dead stop in lets say 4th gear because you didn't downshift. You are proper screwed.
I was looking at it as a life and death stopping manuever but yea, the scenario you set, I get your point and agree. It can all be done simutaneously.
 

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VFRMAN- I have taken an MSF course, my 1198S responds a little differently than the Suzuki 450 I rode in class. :) I have learned that a little rear brake in the corners while canyon riding makes a big difference. As for the speeds I have been mostly talking about 20mph to 30mph emergency maneuvers. Even at this speed it locks the rear wheel instantly. I always shift to first. Based on my msf course I pull all four, clutch, brake, shift, and rear. Thats what I was taught. On this bike that example is going to get me killed!
The experienced rider class you use your own bike. This would give you the opportunity to find out how your bike handles in a controlled environment. It sounds like you have the proper fundamentals (all four) and learning how much brake pressure the bike can handle is all that you need to figure out.

Thumbs up for taking a class! I take them every few years just to refresh my skills and try and kick any bad habits I might develop.

In Utah, the MSF guys used to have ART (Advanced Rider Training) at Miller Motorsports Park. That was a great class! They take you out on the Monster Mile go-cart track for some really good instruction. They might still do this, I haven't been in Utah for a few years.
 

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....so, am I to believe that in these classes, they say " oh, you have a ( put your bike name here 1198, R1 etc ) so you'll want to ignore the first and second thing we talked about in class....blah, blah )

you'd be telling me that the'll taylor it to you, the individual, and your bike?

I'm obviously sceptical, but anyway, just listen to our advice for the moment
 

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....so, am I to believe that in these classes, they say " oh, you have a ( put your bike name here 1198, R1 etc ) so you'll want to ignore the first and second thing we talked about in class....blah, blah )

you'd be telling me that the'll taylor it to you, the individual, and your bike?

I'm obviously sceptical, but anyway, just listen to our advice for the moment

??

Not at all. I am saying you get to practice the same techniques with your own bike, which helps you learn the capabilities of your bike and yourself.

You use the same techniques whether you are riding a Harley, Honda, or Ducati. The physics don't change, just the handling characteristics.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
The experienced rider class you use your own bike. This would give you the opportunity to find out how your bike handles in a controlled environment. It sounds like you have the proper fundamentals (all four) and learning how much brake pressure the bike can handle is all that you need to figure out.

Thumbs up for taking a class! I take them every few years just to refresh my skills and try and kick any bad habits I might develop.

In Utah, the MSF guys used to have ART (Advanced Rider Training) at Miller Motorsports Park. That was a great class! They take you out on the Monster Mile go-cart track for some really good instruction. They might still do this, I haven't been in Utah for a few years.
Thanks Vman, I will most certainly look into taking that experienced rider course. That could be very helpful!
 

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Just a little tip here.Set your brake pedal distance so only the Toe part of your boot is resting on or near that brake pedal,nothing more.The pressure you apply with your toes is all you ever need,and still keep it light pressure.Do not ever grab a fist full of front brake on this bike.Hope it helps.
 

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Just a little tip here.Set your brake pedal distance so only the Toe part of your boot is resting on or near that brake pedal,nothing more.The pressure you apply with your toes is all you ever need,and still keep it light pressure.Do not ever grab a fist full of front brake on this bike.Hope it helps.
I agree! I shudder when I hear the words grab and stomp when it comes to braking. Gradual, progressive squeeze on the lever, two fingers is plenty! I did a panic stop the other day and managed a nice rolling stoppie. Not the best way to stop in the shortest distance possible....
 

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1. Don't use the rear brake. You have a 330mm front rotor that is being stopped by a Brembo monobloc caliber - that will provide more than enough braking power.

2. Take an MSF course.
 

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Just a little tip here.Set your brake pedal distance so only the Toe part of your boot is resting on or near that brake pedal,nothing more.The pressure you apply with your toes is all you ever need,and still keep it light pressure.Do not ever grab a fist full of front brake on this bike.Hope it helps.
That is a very good tip. In other words, adjust the bike to you not you to the bike. I also adjusted the brake and clutch levers to the point as I'm riding my forearms and the back side of my hands are parallel to the levers. As you rest your hands on the grips with extended fingers there should be a straight line from forearms all the way down to finger tips and the fingers barely touching the controls. That way I have better control, better lever modulation and put less strain on my hands and wrist.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Great tips guys, I will make the adjustments. With my size 14's I doubt my pedal will adjust out far enough. However I will train myself to keep my foot off it!
 
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