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I wouldn't get slicks and I especially wouldn't run them without warmers and that's because I've only heard how heat cycles degrade their performance faster. Never put it to the test, though.

I would recommend any of the top brands street/track tire. Haven't been to the track since I moved to Nebraska but I was pushing mid-pack race times (amateur series times) on Dunlop Q2s and Q3s when I lived in Vegas in my R6. Never used warmers, just took it easy the first couple laps. I've also run Pilots and 'Stones but I liked the Dunlops best. I'm sure the Supercorsas are amazing.

Unless you have a tire hook-up I'd save your money and get street/track tires even though they'll be for your dedicated track wheels.
 

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If you're not going to invest in warmers, definitely don't go with slicks. You would probably be ok with some DOT race tires, like Bridgestone R10s, or Pirelli SuperCorsas, or Dunlop GP-A212 (or whatever the new one's called), or the Michelin Power Cups, but just be sure to ease into it for the first couple of laps. The way to heat up tires best is hard braking and hard accelerating with the bike upright, so don't lean too far into turns on the first couple of laps until you get them warm.

If not a set of Dunlop Q3's will work excellent and those can be used on the street as well. IMO however, I think it's odd that you'd invest in an extra set of wheels which probably cost you at least $500 used, but not go for a set of tire warmers which you can get for much cheaper. The set I'm using was $170 brand new! Every now and then someone's selling a used set of Chicken Hawks which are top of the line, for like $200 or so. In the long run they'll pay for themselves because heat cycle is one of the things that destroys tires, and if you're doing 7 sessions in a day, you'll put 7 cycles on without warmers, but if you have warmers you'll put just 1 cycle because the tires will be warm/hot the entire day cuz they'll either be on the warmers or you'll be riding. You'll end up going through more tires if you don't use warmers.
 
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Everyone is fascinated by slicks, but in reality most of the modern DOT race tires are very similar or in the case of Dunlop, identical. What separate's DOT's from slicks is their working heat range. DOT's will over heat around 200F and slicks can take upwards of 220F without overheating. So if you're just a track day guy going out there to have fun, it's more then likely you won't get anywhere near the max tire temp's. Hypersport street tires like the Q3 and Rosso Corse, start to get greasy over 170F, which is about the max a typical non-racer track day guy will do. So that's why you see a lot of people riding with hypersport tires on the track and those tires do work well for the occasional track day guy. What separates race tires from street tires is the chemical reaction race tires have at temperature which allows them to get ultra soft and sticky, generating a huge contact patch. You won't get that with hypersport tires.

Remember, race tires are designed to be one-time use. So that could mean one race, or it could mean a day of racing with tire warmers. The moment you cool them down, you have lost substantial amounts of grip. I've done LOTS of testing with Bridgestone, Pirelli and Dunlop DOT's/slicks over the years and it's absolutely astonishing how much grip is gone the moment you throw ONE heat cycle on them. Every heat cycle after that first one, will reduce grip levels to the point where the tire will start spinning, even though it's not worn. Tire warmers help tremendously because now your only heat cycle is at the end of each day. So instead of putting potentially 8 heat cycles on a tire per day, you may only put 2 - 3 heat cycles on the tire it's entire life (assuming the tire will last 3 events).

This is why for people without warmers, I always recommend running hypersport tires. Sure, you won't get the contact patch, but the heat cycles won't destroy the tire. Race tires take A LONG TIME to heat up and obtain optimal grip levels, especially for people not pushing the upper echelons of quick lap times. I can't tell you how many crashes I've seen with people who've done three or four laps on race tires, thinking they're warmed up by then and crashing heavily.

My suggestion is to try a hypersport tire first and then see how it goes. If you feel it doesn't offer you enough grip, lower the rear pressure until the tire starts to get hot and generate a good contact patch. It's a cheap way to get started doing track days and you won't need to bother with warmers right away. The moment you get quick enough to wear out hypersport tires in one day of riding, then you're ready for race tires and warmers.
 

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Here is what Dan Kyle has posted, and I very much agree with this statement...

"If you are going to ride your bike at a race track, track day, or race day, it does not matter,
PUT ON RACE TIRES. I"

and I would broaden that post to say... put on the best race tires with the best compound for the track you are on.... and get the required warmers... it is the absolute least expensive investment you can make. If they save you from one wreck, forbid it should happen, they have paid for themselves many times over...... you can get a gr8 set of slicks for about $400.00, and a one time investment of a set of warmers for $200,... I just bought a brand damn new, but used, Chicken Hawk Pole position (three heat levels), with side blankets, for $200.00, including shipping. What a bargain..... and they will last forever, properly cared for... you can get away with spending less on other shit, but don't try to cut corners on tires... Plz re-read Dan Kyles opening post..... I most second that!!!! Ask some of the folks who are not racing because they crashed their track bikes, and could not afford to fix them,.... ask them how the crashed....... then tell me why it is a good idea to cut cost by running cheaper tires on the track......
 

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Wera. Please DO NOT close this thread. I'd like to add something to it but am not free just now. It gets tiresome to try to get into a conversation to only have it shut down with no right of reply. If things get out of hand then do the snippety snip.

By 'add something" I mean about tyres, sponsorship and such from the position of someone who's worked in teams in national class racing.

Back soon :)
 

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Good choice on the SC's. I've heard nothing but bad things from people about the superbike pro slicks. There are a couple of threads on here about that ad well. They are "wannabe" slicks
 

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Good choice on the SC's. I've heard nothing but bad things from people about the superbike pro slicks. There are a couple of threads on here about that ad well. They are "wannabe" slicks
Yep, they're pretty worthless for quicker guys.

However, for slower people I've been told they can be acceptable because the carcass is so thick, they last A LONG TIME! It's hard to test them however, I always want to push and the tire never gave me the feedback necessary.

I bet the Rosso Corse would be a PERFECT track day tire for a slower rider. They're quick to heat up and offer pretty consistent grip. Plus, you won't ruin them without the use of warmers. I did a few hot laps on some, but not on a Ducati, so it doesn't really count. I put around 6500 miles on a few sets on my street bike.

People forget about the total cost of warmers, good generators are kinda expensive. However, if you keep your eyes open, you can find them used for around $500, which his worth it in the long run. Blankets are $200 and all you'd need is a front and rear stand after that, which isn't too much more. The amount of safety you get from warmers is really worth it in the long run in my opinion. However, some people can't afford them and I completely understand that.
 

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Just a quickie. The Diablo superbike Pro is a tyre designed specifically for the trackday guy who wants the slick experience without all of the cost. Longevity is designed into it so there is absolutely going to be a compromise on feel. But if you are not racing the point is moot. The Diablo superbike is the slick to use. ( no 'pro' designation ) if you want a race quality tyre. But understand that it's intended to be discarded after every session. ( we would sometimes take them home for a trackday scrub as long as they were not shot but they are pretty much useless after 25 laps racing )
British superbikes use them. I think it's fair to say that's the premiere national race class currently. If that's not a convincer then World superbikes use them. ( SC1, SC2 front SC0, SC1 rear) but again you are not racing so won't get any benefit from them. If you are not prepared to have a number of sets of each compound per meeting as well as warmers for the tyres on the rack and warmers for the tyres on the bike with the two generators that can entail if you don't have a power hookup in your setup then don't consider it.
 

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You can start with the Rosso Corse's and see what happens. Cheap investment in my opinion and if anything, they're a great street tire for the future.
 

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Koo, I like the supercorsa, it's a good tire. :)
 

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Those are slicks right? Not Dot? I ask because I'm a bit coRnfused..

http://psndealer.com/dealersite/ima...Rush-Pirelli-Race-Tire-2015-Prices Edited.pdf
Those are slicks. Mu punctuation was unclear. I meant if you wnt a slick race tyre then that's what you use. The Diablo Supercorsa road tyre ( which is what i assume your DOT designation means, I'm a Brit remember? ) Has been pretty much designed around Ducatis since the 996 ( not saying it was available then but that the technology has come from closely working with Ducati from then ) Which is why I suggest to all trackday guys running a modern Ducati superbike that they should consider the Diablo Supercorsa SC but only idf they are chasing lap times or intend to race. The Supercorsa SP is just fine. Some people prefer the Dunlops and they are also fine. The road tyre of choice ( road racing, not commuting ) would probably be the Metzler Racetec. You will see a lot of those used up at the IOM TT this next two weeks ( although being in the US you probably won't see much of it. I even get MotoAmerica live and highlights over here in the UK, some of you don't even get that i believe? )
 
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