Ducati.org forum banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,230 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Interested in hearing from anyone using the DP Lightweight Flywheel, which is also understood as being the OEM 1098R Flywheel.

I have searched and know the pros vs. cons when it comes to this matter, but curious if the DP/1098R LWFW has the same cons typically associated with the upgrade.

My guess is no, being that it is used as an OEM Ducati item. I found that the OEM LWFW weighs 2.12 lbs (0.960 kg) while the stock flywheels weighs 4.18 lbs (1.898 kg) saving 2.06 lbs (0.938kg).

Please chime in ..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
851 Posts
Could you spin your oem one down on a lathe?

I have the cases open at the moment and am removing my flywheel to get to my gearchange mechanism - had thought it would be a good time to lighten the flywheel, but I am probably not organised enough.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
The DP flywheel and 1098R flywheel are different in weight. The 1098R weighs in around 2lbs while the DP flywheel weighs in around 1lbs to 1.2lbs. If you have a 1098R you won't feel much of a difference until the upper range of rpm's. If your looking for a cheaper route just get your OEM one shaved down. Regardless you will have to raise your idle otherwise the engine will struggle while running.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,230 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The DP flywheel and 1098R flywheel are different in weight. The 1098R weighs in around 2lbs while the DP flywheel weighs in around 1lbs to 1.2lbs. If you have a 1098R you won't feel much of a difference until the upper range of rpm's. If your looking for a cheaper route just get your OEM one shaved down. Regardless you will have to raise your idle otherwise the engine will struggle while running.
I didn't know that the 1098R and DP were different. Shaving down the OEM FW is one route, the 1098R FW is another. Would like to hear from someone with the standard 1098/1198 that has upgraded to the 1098R FW .. thanks for your input -
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
I didn't know that the 1098R and DP were different. Shaving down the OEM FW is one route, the 1098R FW is another. Would like to hear from someone with the standard 1098/1198 that has upgraded to the 1098R FW .. thanks for your input -
Well my roommate has a 1198S and he installed the DP flywheel. I was able to ride his bike before and after the flywheel since he had blown his engine. The bike definitely revs quicker and also the torwards the top end it really hauls. You will notice a difference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,230 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Well my roommate has a 1198S and he installed the DP flywheel. I was able to ride his bike before and after the flywheel since he had blown his engine. The bike definitely revs quicker and also the torwards the top end it really hauls. You will notice a difference.
did your roommate simply swap the Flywheels out -did he have to increase idle as well.?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,790 Posts
I sent ELTwin a PM as he has some insights and weights on this topic.
And he has machined the odd flywheel. Hoping he isn't too busy to add to the discussion.
:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,994 Posts
Yeah, I have spent a lot of time on flywheels, fitting them to many bikes and everyone has been pleased with the results. Providing you do not go excessively light, a lightened flywheel is a win/win situation. More throttle responsive in the lower RPM, more aggressive rush in the upper RPM and increased engine braking off throttle. Not one bike I have done has required an increase in idle RPM or had starting difficulties. I have experimented with weights on my own bikes and have found the sweet spot is around 900 grams. Have tried weights as low as 230 grams (extremely difficult starting this light and significant loss of low end torque, requiring a lot of clutch slip to get going) up to the standard S flywheel at almost 2300 grams.

The more I reduced flywheel mass from the original weight the better it became (in every way) until I went below 800 grams. Below this point it became progressively worse in all aspects for street use. DP offers two flywheels, one that is alloy around 560 grams, the other steel at around 1200 grams.

I have machined almost 2 dozen stock flywheels down and (providing it is done accurately) had zero vibration issues. Much of what I have learned has been posted in other threads on this same subject elsewhere on this forum. I can assure you that you'll not be disappointed with the improvements from either a DP flywheel or a standard R flywheel.

I highly recommend having your stock one machined down (by a reputable and skilled machinist) to about 950 grams. Beware though, the bike will wheelstand even more willingly than it does now. The lighter flywheel does NOT make any more peak power. What it DOES do is alows the engine to produce its power at a more rapid rate, resulting in a steeper torque curve for a more responsive bike with a quicker rate of acceleration.

You won't regret it!
 
  • Like
Reactions: juan1

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
did your roommate simply swap the Flywheels out -did he have to increase idle as well.?
After the installation and when I got to ride it I went through his dash to see if he did increase his idle however it remained the same. So, no, he didn't change his idling. However he did say that if your absolutely want to be on the safe side then its okay to turn the idle up just a little. He pretty much just swapped them out though, but he did it while his engine was blown. Very reputable Ducati mechanic from all the ones that I know of, learned A LOT from him.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,533 Posts
Yeah, I have spent a lot of time on flywheels, fitting them to many bikes and everyone has been pleased with the results. Providing you do not go excessively light, a lightened flywheel is a win/win situation. More throttle responsive in the lower RPM, more aggressive rush in the upper RPM and increased engine braking off throttle. Not one bike I have done has required an increase in idle RPM or had starting difficulties. I have experimented with weights on my own bikes and have found the sweet spot is around 900 grams. Have tried weights as low as 230 grams (extremely difficult starting this light and significant loss of low end torque, requiring a lot of clutch slip to get going) up to the standard S flywheel at almost 2300 grams.

The more I reduced flywheel mass from the original weight the better it became (in every way) until I went below 800 grams. Below this point it became progressively worse in all aspects for street use. DP offers two flywheels, one that is alloy around 560 grams, the other steel at around 1200 grams.

I have machined almost 2 dozen stock flywheels down and (providing it is done accurately) had zero vibration issues. Much of what I have learned has been posted in other threads on this same subject elsewhere on this forum. I can assure you that you'll not be disappointed with the improvements from either a DP flywheel or a standard R flywheel.

I highly recommend having your stock one machined down (by a reputable and skilled machinist) to about 950 grams. Beware though, the bike will wheelstand even more willingly than it does now. The lighter flywheel does NOT make any more peak power. What it DOES do is alows the engine to produce its power at a more rapid rate, resulting in a steeper torque curve for a more responsive bike with a quicker rate of acceleration.

You won't regret it!
ELTWIN is the 560 gram flywheel not good
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,230 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Yeah, I have spent a lot of time on flywheels, fitting them to many bikes and everyone has been pleased with the results. Providing you do not go excessively light, a lightened flywheel is a win/win situation. More throttle responsive in the lower RPM, more aggressive rush in the upper RPM and increased engine braking off throttle. Not one bike I have done has required an increase in idle RPM or had starting difficulties. I have experimented with weights on my own bikes and have found the sweet spot is around 900 grams. Have tried weights as low as 230 grams (extremely difficult starting this light and significant loss of low end torque, requiring a lot of clutch slip to get going) up to the standard S flywheel at almost 2300 grams.

The more I reduced flywheel mass from the original weight the better it became (in every way) until I went below 800 grams. Below this point it became progressively worse in all aspects for street use. DP offers two flywheels, one that is alloy around 560 grams, the other steel at around 1200 grams.

I have machined almost 2 dozen stock flywheels down and (providing it is done accurately) had zero vibration issues. Much of what I have learned has been posted in other threads on this same subject elsewhere on this forum. I can assure you that you'll not be disappointed with the improvements from either a DP flywheel or a standard R flywheel.

I highly recommend having your stock one machined down (by a reputable and skilled machinist) to about 950 grams. Beware though, the bike will wheelstand even more willingly than it does now. The lighter flywheel does NOT make any more peak power. What it DOES do is alows the engine to produce its power at a more rapid rate, resulting in a steeper torque curve for a more responsive bike with a quicker rate of acceleration.

You won't regret it!
I appreciate you input .. thanks !

might be an upgrade to consider over the winter
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,196 Posts
About how much would it cost to have it machined. Where are they taking the weight off of on the flywheel?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Since I'll have to look at my sprag clutch soon does anybody know of a really good mechanist in the US who is willing to bring my OEM 1198 SP flywheel down to 950 grams?

Btw: what flywheel does my SP have? The clutch is DP; not sure about the FW.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,296 Posts
When I did the dry clutch conversion I also got the DP lightweight fly wheel installed on my 848, there is a difference in faster response compared the the stock piece, it does rev quicker in all ways weather from the low, mid or high RPM's...definitely either get the DP fly wheel or get your current one machined down...you can't go wrong!
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top