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Discussion Starter #1
Is it just me as I'm sure no one else has run into the problem I'm having.
I'm trying my hardest to stay under 6000 rpm but I've blipped it to just over a couple of times mainly in second and third as I don't need a speeding ticket and in the higher gears it almost never goes any higher then 4 or 5k or I will get one.
A couple times the sun was at an angle where I know I went over but could not see the speedo at all.
Mainly when pulling onto the interstate.
I hope it's like they say 6000 because they know you're going to go over a little but I guess I'll find out in 200 miles.:):):)
 

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I also had a problem sticking to the 6000 limit on my Monster 1100 EVO, and it didn't hurt anything. It was like trying to suck on a piece of candy, losing control and chewing it.


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As long as you don't sit on the rev limiter within the first few hundred miles, you'll be fine. The bed in process for the rings is actually pretty quick and if you change the oil within a few hundred miles, you should be fine. Manufacturers are way too over conscious about bed in, just go ride the thing and enjoy it.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
It was like trying to suck on a piece of candy, losing control and chewing
You have the perfect analogy. That's exactly what it feels like.

As far as changing the oil I'm letting them do all the maintenance on this one. My first visit is after 600 miles and they say better to be a little over then under so when I hit 600 I'll ride the 70 miles to get it done.
I guess I then have to keep it under 7k till 1500 miles and then I can let it rip.
We will see how well that goes..but I'll certainly enjoy it.
 

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I'm doing a break in on my new 899. Mistakingly revved it a few times to redline when the QS didnt engage propely. Not too worried or bothered by it
 

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What about the break in period up to 1500 miles following the initial 600 mile break in? How important is it? I have not seen that one before.

7000 revs is not bad but it still leaves room for boredom.
 

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What about the break in period up to 1500 miles following the initial 600 mile break in? How important is it?
Every Ducati engine is run-in for ten minutes or more on the dyno using a prescribed rpm and temperature sequence. The piston rings seal is mostly complete after this initial test run. The follow-up part of the break-in that you read in your Owners Manual has little to do with piston ring sealing. It’s meant to accommodate the time it takes for normal wear to occur to thousands of mating parts.

The initial break-in period is actually the final finishing step in manufacturing an engine. At the factory, Ducati hones the cylinder walls to a fine finish, grinds cams to accurate, smooth profiles, and makes connecting rod journals to high standards of roundness and accuracy. But, metal surfaces are still microscopically rough, consisting of tiny peaks and valleys. When you start a new engine, these surfaces must slide over each other and wherever the peaks stick up higher than the local oil film thickness, metal hits metal, welds momentarily from the intense local pressure, and then tears away. The oil flushes away these bits of metal, and the oil filter removes them from circulation.

This process works quickly at first, then more slowly as break-in proceeds. Once the high spots are knocked off or pushed down, the roughness of the surfaces no longer sticks above the oil films. Piston rings have filed themselves into a fine fit to their cylinders. Bearings spin without metal-to-metal contact, on full oil films.

If you decide to ignore Ducati’s recommendation that engine rpm be limited for the break-in period and instead you run at high rpm and heavy throttle, the wear process may generate more heat and metal debris than the lubrication system can handle. Then the result is destruction of contact surfaces in some parts of the engine.

If you use Ducati’s break-in method and gradually build up to higher revs and throttle, the washing action of the oil will keep up with the generation of wear particles, and the surfaces will bed into each other in such a way that the oil film can carry the load.

Finally, the initial period of moderate operation needs to be followed by some hard acceleration and brief trips to the red line. Sustained, high-speed operation is not a good idea because it provides no wash time at low load, during which the oil system can flush away any wear particles.
 
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