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Was thinking of starting to track my 848 and was wondering what were some potential common issues (other than obviously crashing and totaling the entire bike), that I should look out for.

Mainly trying to see if there are some type of extra parts and tools that I should bring to the track with me in case I need to do any minor repairs to keep me on the track.

-Don
 

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Shift lever, foot pegs, brake/clutch levers, and clip-ons...and whatever tools are needed to replace those items.

Also doesn't hurt to have an oil filter wrench and the sockets to take your wheels off. Anything more than that is not really worth doing at the track because you'll be taking a lot of time, unless of course you're traveling a long ways and doing a full weekend and then it may be worth fixing stuff on the first day to get yourself going for the second day. In that case, the more shit you have with you, the better....it's all about how much you care and how much effort/time you're willing to put into it.

Btw, why is this in the racing section?? We do have an "on the track" section right below it :stickpoke
 
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Honestly, the 848 is pretty reliable. If you're just tracking for fun, get a copy of the torque settings and go through major things like caliper and axel bolts to make sure they're set to spec. Also a huge "must" is to buy a oil filter nut with safety wire provision and get that thing safety wired to somewhere on the engine. This way, it will be almost impossible for the nut to come loose and some track day providers require the nut to be wired. Some people even safety wire the oil filter, it's a requirement in racing.

A lot of people go over-kill and change their oil before every track event. If your engine is running well, if your oil isn't black every time you change it, then you can probably get away with not doing anything special with the oil changes.

In terms of extra parts... If it's a stock bike, there isn't much to worry about. If you crash, you'll break levers, bend bars and probably damage other things, so your day is over anyway. If it's a specifically built track bike which already has clip-on's, levers and rear sets, bringing replacement parts for those items is nice so you won't ruin a day from a simple lay down. However, be forewarned that some track day agencies won't let you back on after you crash anyway, especially if you caused a full-course red flag. So brining spares is great for dedicated AND BUILT track bikes, but for your average street bike, there usually isn't much you can do.
 
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i always take lots of tools with me, whatever fits in my backpack, and a gas container.

the only thing i might have on track is softer brake after some time. it could be good to change your fluids before the trackday or at least take fluid and tools with you in case it happens to you.

i didn't know the oil filter wire trick. seems nice even for every day use!

as far as the bike, its always good to have it track-ready. track bodywork (no lights-mirrors-label etc), wheel sliders (perhaps frame if you like them), clip on long brackets that cover the levers, tank cover/protector. these things minimize damage significantly in case of a small crash
 

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Yeah just make sure you wire it right if you do...I had mine safety-wired and it didn't do squat and still came loose. Luckily my belly pan caught all the oil (wasn't really that much) and none of it got onto the track or my rear tire.
 

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isn't some simple wiring just to prevent more than 1/6 lets say of turn enough? i think its to prevent it from completely going out if it loosens up, and with the wire it will loosen up just a tad and it will just start leaking.
 

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Yea, the safety wire should be TIGHT and have some pulling force against the nut going in the opposite direction of unscrewing. So the easiest solution is to buy safety wire screws for the oil screen plate. Then build a safety wire square for those and then run a triangle for the oil drain nut. With opposing forces pulling on the nut, there is no way it will come loose. Eventually if you get good at safety wiring, you can use the same technique, but instead of wire going to the oil drain screw (which you've gotta cut every time you do an oil change) you can run it to a safety wire pin. Safety wire pin's are like bobby pins, only designed specifically for this application. You buy a kit of them in different sizes and you basically build a permanent wire to the pin. Shove the pin through the hole and then all you've gotta do is wire the other side and you're done.

The oil filter wiring is more tricky. The K&N filters have a safety wire provision, but they're a bitch to get off because that ratchet location breaks easy. So what I've always done is run the OEM filters, put a huge hose clamp around the outside with pre=made safety wire netting around part of it. Then run it up the side of the case to one of the oil cooler fittings on the engine it self. You won't do any damage, it doesn't have a lot of force, it's just there to prevent the filter from rattling off.

The most important thing is to set ALL torque figures to spec. I have a beautiful old-school engine-builers torque wrench, cost $250 bux and it's worth every penny. It has a dial indicator right in the center with a marking location and it makes torquing all these little bolts SO much easier. To me, that's the critical part because if you do THAT right, you will never have any problems.
 

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I use the same method for wiring my filter. But you're right fuzion, if wouldn't have come off completely but my wiring job wasn't good enough to be tight and even though it loosened up just a bit, it was enough to start leaking oil. I'm sure it wasn't more than 100 ml, but that's enough to ruin your day if you get it on your rear tire as you're going into a turn. The bellypan did it's job, and I noticed it pretty quickly because one of my friends was following me and told me he saw a bit of blue smoke coming from my bike.

Nowadays, I still wire it because it's required by many track day orgs and especially racing, but I typically just tighten the shit out of it (it is my belief that the specified 11 Nm torque spec is nowhere near tight enough) and then when I replace it I have one of those automotive oil wrenches that looks like round pliers with sharp jaws on it and I squeeze the shit out of it, turn it and comes off very easy. It damages the filter, but who cares, because it goes in the trash anyway.
 

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Go over the bike before you go. I was lazy didn't check my belts, cost me an engine..
 

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But most importantly, make sure you don't forget you damn key! Or the helmet! I've seen that happen before ;)
 

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But most importantly, make sure you don't forget you damn key! Or the helmet! I've seen that happen before ;)
My buddy forgot his key once... Once... Man, was he pissed..
 
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A good women comes in pretty damn handy, not to mention an air conditioned trailer.......
AC'd trailer? Nice one indeed..
As far as the Lady being there with us? Can be good, especially when one's Lady is really good with a camera. She made some extra cash with her photography..
I tried to get my Lady to let myself use that cash for tires?
Nope..
Adding shoes to her closet was her intentions.. Oh well..
 

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