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This is Prolly some good news.... maybe....


© 2014, Roadracing World Publishing, Inc. From a press release issued by American Motorcyclist Association (AMA)::

Out Of The Blackness: A New Day For Professional Road Racing In America! Photo by Brian J. Nelson.
American Motorcyclist Association to sanction MotoAmerica's professional road racing series in North America


PICKERINGTON, Ohio -- The American Motorcyclist Association has announced that it will sanction MotoAmerica, a new North American road racing series. MotoAmerica is an affiliate of KRAVE Group LLC, a partnership that includes three-time MotoGP champion, Wayne Rainey.

MotoAmerica will promote and manage the commercial aspects of MotoAmerica, which will be sanctioned by the AMA and FIM North America. FIM North America is the North American Continental Union of the Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme, the international body for motorcycle sport.

The KRAVE Group is a Costa Mesa, Calif.-based organization that includes Rainey, the three-time 500cc World Champion (1990, 1991 and 1992) and two-time AMA Superbike Champion (1983, 1987), Chuck Aksland, a former racer and 20-year manager of Team Roberts who most recently served as Vice President of Motor Sport Operations at Circuit of The Americas, Terry Karges, a former motorsports marketing executive and team owner who spent 17-years at Roush Performance before being named Executive Director of the Petersen Museum, and Richard Varner, a motorcycle manufacturer, energy sector entrepreneur, philanthropist and businessman.

The KRAVE (Karges, Rainey, Aksland, Varner) Group owns commercial rights to the MotoAmerica Series, and will award AMA and FIM North America No. 1 plates to series class champions. The group will sell sponsorships, develop other commercial relationships for the series, secure tracks, create the calendar, process crew and media credentials and have responsibility for fan engagement.

"If you are an amateur or professional motorcycle road racer in America, if you are a fan of road racing or if you are a company that does business in this industry, this is an exciting day," said AMA President and CEO Rob Dingman. "Our goal has always been to entrust the promoting and commercial rights for professional racing to a talented, dedicated, well-capitalized professional entity, and the KRAVE Group certainly offers all that and more."

Rainey, an AMA Motorcycle Hall of Famer, thanked the AMA for facilitating the acquisition.

"The AMA was instrumental in this deal coming together, serving as negotiator and mediator at all points of discussion," Rainey said. "We appreciate the efforts of Rob Dingman throughout the process."

The Ohio-based AMA, the world's premier motorcycle advocacy group, will staff officials at each round of the professional series and develop an enforcement, appeal and rider license procedure. The AMA will be responsible for issuing professional road racing licenses for the series.

MotoAmerica, in consultation with the AMA, will develop classes, the rules of competition and event procedures. While details of the rulebook are still in development, classes and events will conform to prevailing international standards.

"The structure of our agreement with the AMA serves the goal of developing riders to be successful on the world stage," Rainey said. "It allows a framework that supports advancement from youth competition to novice, from novice to Pro-Am, from Pro-Am to National Championship contention and, for the best of the best, an opportunity to race for a world title."

The AMA, as the U.S. affiliate of the FIM, sanctions FIM-affiliated events in the United States. The AMA, along with the Canadian Motorcycle Association, administers FIM North America, which sanctions continental-level series and championship events in North America. The AMA also sanctions amateur motorcycle competition in America, a role the AMA has fulfilled since it was established in 1924.

"The AMA's roles as FIM affiliate and amateur sanctioning body make it a critical piece to establishing a clear progression for America's road racing community," Rainey said. "We're eager to build a fair, exciting and commercially viable professional road racing series not just for today's stars, but for those who will stand on top of the podium for years to come."

Dingman added: "The MotoAmerica/KRAVE Group has shown throughout the entire process that they have the best interests of the AMA and its members in mind. They not only accepted financial responsibility for the series, but the relationship requires the MotoAmerica Series to sanction its events with the AMA."

As part of the agreement, the AMA has re-acquired the sanctioning, promotional and commercial rights to professional motorcycle road racing in America from Daytona Motorsports Group (DMG), which had purchased those rights from the AMA in 2008. DMG has operated the series for the last seven years and is no longer going to be the promoter of the series.

About the American Motorcyclist Association

Founded in 1924, the AMA is a not-for-profit member-based association whose mission is to promote the motorcycle lifestyle and protect the future of motorcycling. As the world's largest motorcycling rights and event sanctioning organization, the AMA advocates for riders' interests at all levels of government and sanctions thousands of competition and recreational events every year. The AMA also provides money-saving discounts on products and services for its members. Through the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame in Pickerington, Ohio, the AMA honors the heroes and heritage of motorcycling. For more information, visit American Motorcyclist Association.
 

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Halle F*#Kin' lueya!
 

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Ok...time for a stupid question, because I'm a bit confused by this. Who the hell was running the show so far?? Wasn't it AMA? What is DMG and what was their role in it?? Someone please explain how professional road racing works in america, cuz I obviously was misinformed for the last few years :confused:
 

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Few notes:

- Its now a North America FIM sanctioned race series, following DORNA's rules/suggestions.
- Wayne Rainey is the key player and the person developing the class structure in conjunction with Dorna directly.
- The series will contain both privateer/amateur AND professional racing events under one roof. (good bye WERA National's)
- Dorna will over-see an all-new specialized youth training program. (KTM RC390 cup is the concept)

 

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Nice looking kit the ktm.

This makes me wonder why a 390cc, assuming it is a 390cc four stroke. Is it intentionally done to fast-track the youngsters into motogp? I would think there is a benefit in that the kids who do well on it would make an easy transition to moto3, or is that not how it works?

I also like that Rainey will be selecting the courses. I presume he would favor tracks that are most similar to those on the motogp calendar, if that's even possible. I bet Texas, Laguna and Indi are already on the list. Maybe throw in some South American venues as well.

Tye with proper funding I don't see why there can't be a USA champ by 2017. 2018 is probably more realistic if everything goes well.
 

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A lot still has to happen before we can even dream of another champion from here. However, I'm extremely optimistic that THIS group of men have the knowledge, experience, and clout to make all of it happen. Hopefully they can take the first big step and get the manufacturers interested again.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Anything can be better than what currently exists concerning Motorcycle Roadracing in the USA.
We have such a long, long, way to go before equaling the situation in most Euro countries, Austalia, etcetc. I would wonder what John Ulrich's role in the "new" configuration.
 
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This makes me wonder why a 390cc, assuming it is a 390cc four stroke.
Ohh its based on the Duke 690 platform, so the displacement is another "90" which is silly, but whatever. Its a DOHC, 45hp, 4 stroke that weighs 290lb dry. :)

The bike was developed specifically for new racer programs AND will be available in the states as of 2015.
 

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Ohh its based on the Duke 690 platform, so the displacement is another "90" which is silly, but whatever. Its a DOHC, 45hp, 4 stroke that weighs 290lb dry. :)

The bike was developed specifically for new racer programs AND will be available in the states as of 2015.
All I know is I want one! :D
 

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All I know is I want one! :D
Yep! Same here! Still waiting to see how much it will cost (the street legal version). In the UK it's supposedly in the 6000 pound range, which I'm not sure how that compares to a ninja 300 in the UK. My guess is that here in the US msrp will be around $7000 to $8000.
 

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Looking forward to improvements , I just hope they can attract factory support, industry support, and most importantly outside support and TV coverage. They could really use 3 team bikes from each Japanese manufacture, and 2 to 3 from multiple euro manufactures for superbike, plus privateers.
 

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For a bespoke race bike? Prepped already as most every KTM always is? Sounds like a deal to me!
The RC390 is actually made in India, so it doesn't have the same high-end components as the other KTM's do. The race bike will be made by the same factory, but will have many of the component issues fixed.

Rumors are the standard production bike will be low $6k range and the race bike will be $9 - $10k.

KTM have done a great job in recent years, building motorcycles for the "in between" markets. Its not a 250 its a 390, its not a 600 inline its a 690 single. When the Duke 690R makes it state side (which is an eventuality) that will be the next big mid-class bike. Over 72hp and 62lb torque in a package that weighs 425lb dry. Fully adjustable suspension AND most importantly crash bars come stock! LOL :)

Unfortunately, KTM are killing the RC8 project. The RC8 race is an amazing package out of the box, but they simply couldn't sell enough street going models to continue making the bike. Developing a higher-end machine is too costly for such a small market. Beginner bikes like the RC390 are a great market and sell tens of thousands per year, vs a few thousand high-end sport bikes.

Exciting stuff, I truly hope it all pans out like it appears to be. :)
 
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