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I just purchased my first 848 and am in love! I found a 2011 848evo with 600 miles on for a song and had to snatch it up. My only concern is the timing belt. The previous owner started the bike once a week and let it warm up as he did. Should I be worried about the belt or just go and ride? Also is there anything I should or need to do to this bike? Any input helps!
 

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Congrats on your purchase! Unless you have paperwork stating otherwise, I'd assume the timing belt is about 4 years old; better safe than sorry and just have the piece of mind and replace it. Aside from that, just get your suspension properly dialed in and just ride the hell out of her!
 
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Congrats! I fell in love the first time when I got mine. Personally I'd find a good indy shop and get the belts done, just for peace of mind. While in the shop get them to set up the suspension for you're weight as white_duc suggests.
 

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Congrats, got mine about 2 weeks ago, still go to the garage for no reason just to look at it.. Im sure you will be doing the same.. Post a pic of your new toy.
 

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Welcome!

The belts are probably OK, the modern belts aren't a real problem. I'd ride it for a while and schedule a time to do the belts up the road. I'd do an oil change right away as it probably hasn't been done. I'd also be worried about the battery and fuel filter, because the bike hasn't been ridden, the fuel could be pretty old and the batteries are known to go bad if let sitting around. So just a few things to think about, nothing urgent though. Once you do the oil change, ride it and see what happens.
 

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Sound advice....
Ducati recommends 15,000 mile belt changes. Most customers won't change their belts before that mileage and time is not a problem anymore with the Kevlar belts. There are literally tens of thousands of Ducati's rolling around the streets who have many more years on their belts. In fact, many people on this very forum have machines that are MUCH older and haven't done a single belt change.

So yes, it's perfectly fine to ride the bike around and enjoy it before spending all that money to swap brand new belts.
 

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Manual has time and mileage.

Taking the belt covers off to look at the belts, won't tell you if they're loose or overly tight. A bike with 600 miles on the clock will show no wear on the belts.
 

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Brittle? Cracking? Kevlar belts? with 600 miles? Sorry no way.

What you fail to realize is that these timing belts are nearly identical to those used on many Japanese car's including the Mazda Miata. Those engines put WAY more stresses on the belt then Ducati's and last 100,000 miles or more without any problems. Ducati is way underestimating the belt's potential at 15,000 miles. They "suggest" that date so they can be safe and dealerships can make money. Anyone who's had more then one Ducati knows these belts last a long time with no problems.

Your belt issues were caused by outside forces, not the belt failing on it's own accord.
 

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Do ducati's bend valves if the belt snaps?
The valves usually mushroom in the guides, which means there is a lot of cleanup work. I had it happen to one of my engines because the idiot who built the engine before I bought it, put an extra spacer behind the mobile roller and the belt twisted enough at higher RPM's to touch teeth to teeth. So the belt literally disintegrated one day on the track, causing the top end to freeze up. Only damaged one set of valves, guides and two rocker arms. No big deal and after re-build, the engine lasted me another 5k miles or so before that same cylinders bottom end let go, most likely from the incident.
 

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It's a 2011 for gosh sakes, even if it was found in a barn, the belts would be in tip-top shape with 600 miles on the clock. 12,000 miles? 8 years old? Sitting in the desert under a car port? Yea, I'd say don't ride it and replace those belts.
 
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