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On the other side of the comments, saying stuff like the 848 is faster than any car I've ever been in, and that I'll never think it's slow.. Is pretty comparable to telling me that I couldn't drive a Corvette in the snow. I don't know how long it would take, but I'm sure there would come a day when I would feel that "meh, it could be faster"

Wow. I'm nearly speechless.

First, no one cares that you've driven a Corvette in the snow. That doesn't make you a good driver, despite the fact that you've convinced yourself that it does.

Second, someone making the statement that an 848 is faster than any car you've been in is in no way comparable to saying you can't drive a Corvette in the snow. Period. I can't even contemplate how you believe that it is.

I beg you to be careful when you actually purchase the bike that is going to be clearly above your riding abilities. That, coupled with your overconfidence, is a recipe for disaster.
 

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Sounds to me that you'll do what you want anyway.

Sounds to me you have money to burn.

Sounds to me you like speed.

Sounds to me you'll ride recklessly despite what you may say or think now.

When you go down try not to involve anyone else.


And for the record I doubt my local Ducati dealer would sell a 1098 to a new rider, irrespective of the car they drive.
 

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the best riders in the world...learned in the dirt, on smaller cc machines and started to ride at a very young age..

my experiences at the shop with crashed machines

most notable new license rider (not novice) crash..620 multistrada..on the day of customer pick up and 3 blocks away from the shop..customer dropped the bike,causing over $3000worth of damage..bike off the road for more than a month..going thru insurance,parts availability,and repair process...customer's insurance premiums increased and luckily customer was not hurt...the bike was brand new and had 13klm's on the clock

most notable experienced rider crash..new 1098 owner applied a little too much throttle coming out of a roundabout and accidently wheelstood the bike lost control and dropped it...again about a month going thru the repairs and insurance process, all after owning the bike for less than a week
this rider's previous bike was a 600 monster

most notable demo bike crash....an experienced rider and owner of some performance 1000 japbike..
turned right out of our street and proceeded to crash the 1098 demo writing it off..before the end of the first straight, rider was taken away in an ambulance with a broken shoulder...accident due to over confidence and
applying too much throttle, too quickly and then braking too hard..
the demo bike was destroyed in under 5 minutes

a very tragic accident about 2 weeks ago claimed the life of one of our customers whilst he was riding his gt1000..again an experienced rider in his mid forties who fully respected and cherished his machine..

most of the crashed machines that come into the shop for repairs are superbikes....very rarely do we see a monster or any of the other 2 valvers come in for smash repairs...
what we see from a dealership perspective is very heartbreaking, we deal with a lot of customers and a lot of bikes....
 

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Wow

the best riders in the world...learned in the dirt, on smaller cc machines and started to ride at a very young age..

my experiences at the shop with crashed machines

most notable new license rider (not novice) crash..620 multistrada..on the day of customer pick up and 3 blocks away from the shop..customer dropped the bike,causing over $3000worth of damage..bike off the road for more than a month..going thru insurance,parts availability,and repair process...customer's insurance premiums increased and luckily customer was not hurt...the bike was brand new and had 13klm's on the clock

most notable experienced rider crash..new 1098 owner applied a little too much throttle coming out of a roundabout and accidently wheelstood the bike lost control and dropped it...again about a month going thru the repairs and insurance process, all after owning the bike for less than a week
this rider's previous bike was a 600 monster

most notable demo bike crash....an experienced rider and owner of some performance 1000 japbike..
turned right out of our street and proceeded to crash the 1098 demo writing it off..before the end of the first straight, rider was taken away in an ambulance with a broken shoulder...accident due to over confidence and
applying too much throttle, too quickly and then braking too hard..
the demo bike was destroyed in under 5 minutes

a very tragic accident about 2 weeks ago claimed the life of one of our customers whilst he was riding his gt1000..again an experienced rider in his mid forties who fully respected and cherished his machine..

most of the crashed machines that come into the shop for repairs are superbikes....very rarely do we see a monster or any of the other 2 valvers come in for smash repairs...
what we see from a dealership perspective is very heartbreaking, we deal with a lot of customers and a lot of bikes....
I am even MORE impressed with you then EVER Ms. TW!! YOU my dear speak logic, common sense and you do it with confidence and back it with experience! After your last few posts I don't believe that there is a RATIONAL human being that could in their right mind, argue with you.

I for one agree that using a 1098, even over an inline four, liter bike for a first bike is not a good choice. The 1098 is a touchy machine even in the hands of an experienced rider that is getting on one for the first time. Makes NO sense but people will do what they want to do and there is no talking them out of it.

Again Ms. TW. Very impressive.

Peace
Peewee
 

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This has been very interesting, but so opposite of my 20 year experience. I have instructed many new riders. I have always told them to buy the bike they want and learn to ride that bike. Not one has had an accident as the result of them not knowing how to handle their bike. The accidents they have had were the result of not being situationally aware. Cars turning left in front of them; slick road surfaces, etc, etc.

This young lady has explained that she intends to seek proper training and only spoke of her driving experience as a reference to her ability to learn performance motoring. Yet, so many of you have chosen to reflect your biases and mistakes onto her. I do agree that if you intend to teach yourself, get a small bike...better yet, just go out and throw yourself under a moving bus.

I have seen new riders taught to ride 800lbs Goldwings and 200 HP race bikes. I have also met riders who had 10 years experience and didn't understand counter steering. After 10 minutes of discussion and road demonstration they figure out that they have been riding with bad habits the entire time.

Those of you who think starting small is better, spend a little time explaining how you were introduced to motorcycling. I'd really like to know because it helps me add to my lesson plans for instructing.

I am even MORE impressed with you then EVER Ms. TW!! ...

Again Ms. TW. Very impressive.

Peace
Peewee
 

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Hi Layla

You're athletic and you sound confident and fearless, but never underestimate the power of these superbikes. The best advice I received before I bought my first street bike was to test drive as many as you can and buy one that is slightly above your confidence level. The motorcycle training school puts you on little 250's which are very easy to ride and forgiving, but you'll be bored with that within a week. Most people recommended 600cc as a good place to start if it's your first bike.

I don't know if you ride dirt bikes or not, but I would suggest you start there, or at least learn dirt while you're getting used to street. Practice all of this on bikes you won't worry about dropping. Very quickly you will have the confidence to get on that 1098 or my guess, you're going to want the 1198 within a year.

The other good advice I received was to respect the bike, the rode, and always...always...always leave plenty of space between you and the other crazy people on the road. Always have an out...just like when driving a car.
 

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right..

take it easy girl :)


my girlfriend now wants a Ducati too... mmm... I must say I am not crazy about the idea of knowing she's riding around... I had two major accidents where drivers almost killed me (41days once and 6days at the hospital the second time, no joke)

but I ALSO must say..

NOTHING HOTTER THAN A GIRL ON A DUCATI.

I'm getting a Monster for my girl :yo:


again.... EASY OUT THERE....

it's not you... it's the others.
 

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Wow this is a wild post as in Layla, man you have one healthy attitude about horsepower.

You’re every speed freaks dream.

But seriously, if you want to get into riding. Without a doubt start light, as in power.

As in style, street, dirt or dual sport. Pick the one you will most likely be doing. And that sounds like street.

As for getting the basics down on riding, hand clutch, hand brake, hand throttle and foot shift. Get on someone’s smaller bike.

It will be a piece of cake for you to master in no time at all.

I just went through this with someone in the neighborhood. I let them use one of the bikes to start out with. It is a smaller Yamaha.

They mastered it in a very short time. The only trouble is now they are pointing at my Supermoto and 1098S.

It ani’t happening.

However she is shopping around for a low budget “rat bike”, which is a pretty cool and respectable way to be on the street scene these days.

So in short…. don’t waste your money on a 1098.

Waste being, too much bike to start with.

5K will get you all the bike you could want to work with and still carry plenty of street ced.

Well I gotta jet,. It’s St. V, day, second act.
 

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i ve gotta ask the question.only because this thread is bordering on the ridiculous !! i ve yet to see a first timer ride a baby monster successfully !!!without giving others in the riding group a bit of a scare[due to mistakes/inattentiveness of the new rider] during a day out riding with a large doc club group. do any usa states have any restrictions on power/size of motorcycle for first timers/newbies/amateurs and dreamers ?.hj
 

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X, it's a bloke on bike...:nutkick:

:stickpoke bit worried about you now...

i ve gotta ask the question.only because this thread is bordering on the ridiculous !! i ve yet to see a first timer ride a baby monster successfully !!!without giving others in the riding group a bit of a scare[due to mistakes/inattentiveness of the new rider] during a day out riding with a large doc club group. do any usa states have any restrictions on power/size of motorcycle for first timers/newbies/amateurs and dreamers ?.hj
+1 HJ, we've been on plenty of club rides in the past with learners ...
 

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No restrictions here in the States.

When it comes to big brother watching you (The Gov) they’ll let anyone drive what they want.

However there is the obvious with larger trucks.
 

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This has been very interesting, but so opposite of my 20 year experience. I have instructed many new riders. I have always told them to buy the bike they want and learn to ride that bike. Not one has had an accident as the result of them not knowing how to handle their bike. The accidents they have had were the result of not being situationally aware. Cars turning left in front of them; slick road surfaces, etc, etc.

This young lady has explained that she intends to seek proper training and only spoke of her driving experience as a reference to her ability to learn performance motoring. Yet, so many of you have chosen to reflect your biases and mistakes onto her. I do agree that if you intend to teach yourself, get a small bike...better yet, just go out and throw yourself under a moving bus.

I have seen new riders taught to ride 800lbs Goldwings and 200 HP race bikes. I have also met riders who had 10 years experience and didn't understand counter steering. After 10 minutes of discussion and road demonstration they figure out that they have been riding with bad habits the entire time.

Those of you who think starting small is better, spend a little time explaining how you were introduced to motorcycling. I'd really like to know because it helps me add to my lesson plans for instructing.
if in fact your vocation is riding instructor,
i can see where you draw your legal line in the legal sand, ..and relinquish yourself of responsibility by separating the learning process into 2 categories..'handling' and 'situational awareness'..arent they componants of riding that should be packaged together as one and the same?

you could teach a monkey to ride a bike, anyone can pass a test if they really want to, doesnt mean whats learnt is going to be applied once they are out the door,and never to be seen by you again...(because they're at the bikeshop)
i wont argue the fact that a rider can be taught on a larger cc machine, as riding technique principles translate thru almost all bikes.
but i do not agree with, and would never recommend a 4valve superbike of any description as a starter..even with rider tuition...they may as well thro themselves under a bus..
i will argue, and am yet again terrified by, the irresponsibility of your licensing system

an american instructor teaches a new rider to 'handle' a bike then packs them off to the door, waves goodbye..and says
'off you go now and get some 'situational awareness' or get 'situationally aware', on your top of the range overpowered performance machine'
whilst an australian instructor teaches a new rider to 'handle' a lower engine capacity machine, packs them off to the door, waves goodbye and says 'off you go now and get 12 months worth of 'situational awareness' then you can purchase your top of the range overpowered performance machine'...
who the hell has got it right here?

australian licensing law has in the interest of, and care and concern for new riders, capped engine capacity and implicated a 'cooling off period', for new riders to gain or gather 'situational awareness', before they graduate to highly powered machines..
these regulations have been in place for....20years?...not entirely sure of the exact time.. its a simple common-sense law introduced in an effort to preserve the lives and safety of our young

if a new rider has excess power on tap..do you really think that they are not going to be tempted to use it?...
throw in the human factor and realise that we as human beings...get complacent, egotistical, ignorant, foolish, slow to reflex...a miriade of factors are thrown into the mix on a day to day basis..do you really think that you are in the heads of your students..governing them after they have left you?
hell.. even feeling off color can put lessons learnt in a short amount of time on a course, fuzzy and out of focus...
where, in contrast, repeated time learnt real life experiences are etched indelibly in the subconcious and become reflex

a requirement of my past position, was that i took a minimum of one advanced rider training 'refresher course' at maximum intervals of every 2 years,..this was to uphold quality standards imposed by insurance company requirements...
not once did my peers or myself go back to an instructor to tell them ..
'hey i havent had a crash, because i was taught how to handle my bike correctly', or 'hey i had a crash because i was not being situationally aware at the time'
not one accident?..bunk....an individual instructor would not know accurate stats from public roads unless they themselves or their employer have been subject to an enquiry by government,law,insurance co., or employer, due to an extraordinary amount of accidents/fatalities traced back to the instructor as an initial source, the instructor is forgotten once the student leaves his or her tarmac...hopefully, all of the instruction is not..

i pose one more illustration for you..(my posts are long winded and boring enough ...sorry about that)
you as an instructor,make your dollars by teaching new riders,..and support their desires to have a high powered machine as a first bike, and becoming 'situationally aware' after the fact

the new rider goes off to a bike shop to purchase one...

we at the bike shops...who make our dollars by selling them the bikes..
say..nup, not today sorry...go away for 12 months, become what you term 'situationally aware', before the fact...go out and learn some road craft, experience situations, hone your skills,practise, on a smaller bike, then come back and buy a superbike

you make the money...we lose the money>because we give a shit about our people coming back to us in one piece

ask,stoner,hayden,capirossi,canepa,bayliss,kahlio,gibernau,haga,lavilla,lanzi,xaus,biaggi
about the small bike as a learner advantage, and why they didnt start out on the desmosedici..
that'll give em a laugh for sure

o and ps....yet another story from my pissant life
a customer bought a 1098s off us to use as a race bike, he was at the time too young to get his road license, but he went on to get second place in the 'pro twin' class of the australian superbike competition of 2008, he (daniel wheeler) will still be required by law to have a 250cc restricted license for 12 months when he comes of age to do so at 17
daniel had his come-upance thru the ranks of motorcycle sports on second hand dirt bikes that belonged to casey stoner in his younger years..
that does not change the fact that he has little or no road riding experience, and although he is experienced and far less likely to kill himself or someone else on the road he has to comply with our laws and road rules ....even our exceptionals are no exception to the rules.. which are rules you wont find many australians complain about..
 

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I was born and raised in the UK

and went through the graduated motorcycle system where you start at 16 with a 50cc, and then onto 250cc at 17 and then whatever you wanted at 18, with a test at each level (from memory, it was a few years ago). Since moving to Canada I've had to work my way through the whole licensing system again, for cars as well as bikes. The standard required to getting your first car licence approximates to being able to recognise your own car to pass the test for a basic drivers licence and then being able to unlock the doors and move it to pass a second test for a full licence. The motorcycle licence isn't much different.

I saw a guy cruising around my home town on a huge Harley, who had failed his M2 motorcycle licence test the day before (he was on the same course as me). He'd not been able to demonstrate adequate control of a 125cc Honda yet, by virtue of being able to afford the insurance, was still legally allowed to ride a 1600c Harley around town.

North American driver/rider licensing is a joke. It's basically 'if you can afford it, you can drive/ride it'.
 

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Forget it boys and girls, She's gone home. She came here for encouragment and approval not a reality check. I think she was hoping for a unanimous "FUCK YEAH, ride the fastest bike you can get your hands on".

Instead she got reality whiplash. Hopefully she works it out, Kinda why laws need to be in place, its got zero to do with freedom and everthing tp do safety, yours and ours cus it turns out egotistical maniacs are dangerous.....who knew:rolleyes:
 
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