Ducati.org forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
395 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, posted in the 848 section but hopefully will get some more views here as well, desperate for help.

Tried to bleed my brakes, definitely got air in the lines. My front brake pads are now slightly clamped on the front rotors, i can spin the wheel by hand but the pads are firmly on the rotors so the wheel stops as soon as i stop applying force.


Been doing some more reading, looks like i just need 2 people to bleed this thing easily. Regarding the front pads, do i need to press them back in so they are not clamped down on the rotor before i try to bleed again (basically compress the piston back into the caliper)? If so, can i just use a flat head to pry the pads back into the caliper or is there a special way i should do it?

Here is my plan of attack:

Start at master, then left caliper, then right caliper, maybe master again at the end if still feels like air in system.

Attach hose to bleeder nipple and empty bottle, pump up brake lever about 3 times and then hold on last pump, crack the bleeder slowly and lever should slowly compress towards handle. Close the bleeder before the lever touches the handle, do not release the lever until bleeder is closed or it will suck in air.

How many reservoirs of brake fluid should i be going through for each bleed? (master, left, right)

Anything else i need to take into account?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
226 Posts
You've got the basic procedure down. Shouldn't need to push the caliper pistons back unless you had them disconnected and emptied them. Lots of opinions on the best procedure, calipers first, master first, etc. I usually start with the left caliper because it has a loop to the right side, then the left and finally the master. Figure having to refill the reservoir 4-5 times maybe more before your all done. I also usually tap the caliper and master with a plastic mallet to knock any bubbles loose inside so they'll float to the high points, that's usually where the bleed ports are located. Also you can do this yourself, its kinda like playing twister :p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,313 Posts
I'm late to the game and you likely figgered it out already.

But,, is the lever letting the master completely retract? If not the piston will block the bleed hole in the master and retain pressure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
395 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I'm late to the game and you likely figgered it out already.

But,, is the lever letting the master completely retract? If not the piston will block the bleed hole in the master and retain pressure.
At the time, the lever was pretty much solid, so i am guessing that is what the issue was. I ended up doing it the "old school" way where i just put a piece of tube on the bleeder, charged up the handle, crack the bleeder and slowly squeeze brake lever until almost touch handle, then close bleeder before handle makes contact.

I only had a few tiny air bubbles in the line which were causing the issues. I just had the bike up on the stands yesterday and the front wheel now spins pretty freely and BARELY makes contact with the pads, although they are still scraping a little but that is how they are designed to work from what i have read.

For anyone else wanting to do their brake fluid, i highly suggest doing it the "old school" way and not messing with the mityvac. However, i did have success with the mityvac when doing the clutch fluid so it still has its purposes.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top