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Discussion Starter #1
I've had my 2011 1198 now for one year having bought it with only 1226 miles. Most of my riding has been in town riding and have only put 1800 miles on it to date. 3 weeks ago took it for a 13-hour ride thru eastern Oregon (thank you Oregon for the non-ethanol PREMIUM fuel!!) with a Hyabusa and a 996 carbon WSBK street machine. Sumpter, Oregon offers some great twisty roads as does Granite and Anthony Lakes.

However, with twisty roads comes hard braking. What I noticed after my brakes heated up was a violent front end shudder, and it was so bad that I couldn't comfortably keep pace with even the Hyabusa (in a slight defense of my 1198 when it came time to pass cars I would nearly run over the Hyabusa).

So, here I am. A low mileage Ducati with severe braking capabilities. What gives? Why or how could the brake rotors be warped? And this may not even be the problem because it only happens when the brakes get up to temp. If they were warped it would happen constantly. These are factory Ducati pads, rotors, calipers, etc. Does anyone have any idears? Could the calipers be misaligned?
 

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Yes, it sounds like a warped rotor or rotors. Although, the pads could be cooked too. The stock rotors and pads are usually decent for the street, but they can wear out fairly quickly at the track.

You bought the bike used, so maybe someone took your bike to the track before you bought it. Or someone used those rotors and or pads at the track then put them on your bike before selling it to you.

Either:

You need to take the braking system apart yourself or have a competent shop do it. Inspect all the components and check for wear. Check those pads out. Check the rotors for straightness and thickness, this can be done on the bike too, but it is much easier off the bike.

Or

For a quick DYI:
Check pads out 1st and change the brake pads if necessary (as pads could be cooked). Bleed the brakes with really good bike fluid. If it doesn't fix the problem. Then you now know it's obviously the rotors (or a rotor) that needs to be changed. Hopefully, new pads will take care of it, because rotors obviously cost more.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I'll definitely check the rotors and pads. It's just strange that they are fine until they get hot. Maybe some full floating rotors are in order? But, I'm gonna change my fluid too. If the fluid is getting really hot, what would be the outcome? What's happening isn't brake fade by any means. It's almost a total loss of control braking into a corner, and I hate to say it but my CBR900RR with retrofitted RC51 calipers/master cylinder has better braking control when hot :confused:
 

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My buddy was having kinda the same problem except I think it was when he was hard braking, front end would shake. Had his bike at the dealer ship (for another maintenance issue) and the mechanic told him his pads were done.
When we were changing out the pads there was plenty of material left but they had chips and pieces missing like they were chewed up around some edges, switched the pads to EBC HH so far so good. I hope this can help somewhat.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yes, this only happens when I brake hard and they're hot.

I just went out and loosened the bolts to check the pads. Could only get the left side off without removing wheel, but they look to be in perfect shape. Couldn't see the other side. To help align the calipers I squeezed the brake lever while tightening the bolts. I read somewhere that's one way of aligning the calipers. It's too blistering hot to do anything else to the bike, like ride it, so I'm gonna start shopping for pads...
 

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clean your disks and pads with emery cloth and brake cleaner. you don't have a warped disk. also check the disk holders arnt bound up and can rotate.
 

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It maybe a warped rotor, but usually you can feel a warped rotor when the brakes are cold as well. So if the bike works flawlessly when cold, then I'd look somewhere else. Brake pads would be the first thing, for sure check them out and make sure the calipers are tightened down. You may have a stuck piston as well, causing the pads to over heat in one area, thats common with older bikes.
 

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I had the same problem with my 1098R. I only felt the shudder when ever I really started getting going. I replaced the stock Brembo rotors with Galfer Superbike rotors - the best addition I ever made to my bike. Also I replaced the OEM lines with Galfer lines and pads. Now the brakes never fade and I feel like I could stop on a dime. In short I ride a lot faster now and brake right into the apex.

The one habit I did change is I never hold the front brake at a stop but rather use my rear brake if needed.
 

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The one habit I did change is I never hold the front brake at a stop but rather use my rear brake if needed.
The pads are always touching the rotor on these bikes. So holding the brake and not holding the brake, won't make much of a difference when stopped in a working brake system. If you have a leak in one of the piston seals, it makes a huge difference.
 

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The pads are always touching the rotor on these bikes. So holding the brake and not holding the brake, won't make much of a difference when stopped in a working brake system. If you have a leak in one of the piston seals, it makes a huge difference.
It is beyond this forum to discuss the laws of thermodynamics but you should recognize that your pads do not pass on heat when they are not pressing against your rotors. If you hold your front brakes at a stop after using them vigorously you will transfer heat to the rotor at the point of contact, making this the major cause of rotor warping.
 

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It is beyond this forum to discuss the laws of thermodynamics but you should recognize that your pads do not pass on heat when they are not pressing against your rotors. If you hold your front brakes at a stop after using them vigorously you will transfer heat to the rotor at the point of contact, making this the major cause of rotor warping.
They are pressing against the rotors. When you release the brake lever, there is still pressure in the system. The pads are still fully touching the rotor, all the time. Yes, they aren't under the same pressure/force as they would be if the brake lever was activated. But there is enough contact between the pad and rotor to initiate excellent thermal transfer.

But yea, I've always held my brake lever at stop lights to engage the rear light and never had anything warp or fail on any bike or car.
 

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They are pressing against the rotors. When you release the brake lever, there is still pressure in the system. The pads are still fully touching the rotor, all the time. Yes, they aren't under the same pressure/force as they would be if the brake lever was activated. But there is enough contact between the pad and rotor to initiate excellent thermal transfer.

But yea, I've always held my brake lever at stop lights to engage the rear light and never had anything warp or fail on any bike or car.
In short, it is about density with thermodynamics. In other words, you think the pads are pressing against rotors all the time but in fact there are molecules of gasses (air) separating the pads from the rotors otherwise the wheel would never rotate. When they stop rotating and when the brakes are engaged is when the heat is transfer to one location causing warping.

You probably never experience this because you probably don't ride hard enough right before you come to a stop on your bike. In a car on the race track, you avoid pressing the brake in the pits for the same reason. Those who press their brake in the pits can be seen with smoke coming from all four wheels. I real newbie mistake on the race track.

Remember, this thread is about someone who has an 1198 and rides hard not someone just cruising on a Sunday afternoon.
 

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You probably never experience this because you probably don't ride hard enough right before you come to a stop on your bike.
That could be the case, I never touched the brakes when I lined up on the grid for a race after the warmup lap.

I've done plenty of canyon riding, lots of stop start, heavy breaking stuff as well.

Never once encountered anything like this on a car or bike. But then again, anything can happen!
 

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@NY_1098R


So are you saying, the grinding feeling and grinding sound you hear when one pushes a modern day sportbike, that it's really just gas molecules that are making that grinding feeling/sounds and not the brake pads coming into contact with the rotors?
 
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