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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Home made Ducati service tools

Has anyone tried making Factory Service Tools at home ?
" I knocked this together in my shed " .... ha ha ha ! ... that sort of thing...

As many people will know , these tools cost big money if bought from Ducati.
I suspect that dealers get them free , or at least with a massive discount.
When I first started doing my own work , I met with a few members of my local
Owners Club ....
..........my second question was " How many of the Factory Service Tools
does the club own ? "
Answer ........ " None "

When I realised that I would soon need some of these Ducati factory service tools,
I made a list , using my factory service manual for reference and for part numbers.
Then I got a quote from the local dealer ...... well over $1000 ! ..... and that DIDN'T
include the " Mathesis" tester, which is about $1000 on it's own !

I decided to make some of them myself using nothing more than a vice , an angle grinder
a drill , and a bit of welding.
All the materials came from scrap stuff that was just kicking around in my workshop ,
and I bought some old sockets and wrenches ( spanners ) from car-boot sales ,
(yard sales etc ).

These are the tools that I needed , and made for myself.
I don't know the Ducati part numbers because I don't have my manual to hand ,
I'm sure all home mechanics will recognise them anyway , and as far as I know ,
they will work for most models.

1] Steering bearing tension tool - locates into the ring nut with 8 holes and a slot
It allows you to put a torque wrench directly onto the nut
Ducati charge ~$90
..... cost to make - little more than zero , just time and junk.

2] Camshaft locking tool - vital for removing , replacing , torquing the ring nuts that
retain the camshaft pulleys ( Ducati call them "Elastic Nuts " )

3] Special socket to remove / replace those "Elastic " ring nuts .... they are a plain ring nut ,
( looks like aluminium) with 4 notches , 90 degrees apart.

4] Clutch basket locking tool - about $180 from Ducati ; cost to make .... near zero
..... same goes for a similar tool that locks the clutch hub ( " center " )
..... similar price from Ducati .
NB both of these give an excellent option to the " Engine turning" tool.

5] Cylinder head torque adaptor ..... with most models it is impossible to get a regular
socket plus torque wrench onto those nuts.


If anyone is interested , I can give details of how to make all of these tools .
Unfortunately I cannot give exact measurements or photos just now because they are
in storage , along with the factory service manual I mentioned above.

Have any other members got more suggestions ?

Maybe we could make a separate thread / section on the forum ....
...... a useful knowledge base for people new to home maintenance ?
 

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Necessity is the Mother of Invention, but some of the tools from Ducati really are very nice, time saving, and protect the very expensive parts. Also Hdesa makes some, but I have never used any, so I cannot give a review, perhaps another Forum member has first hand experience. I do know some friends have made a "clutch holding tool" out of used steel clutch plates welded to a handle. Works very well.....
 

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I can assure you Oldtech that Ducati dealers do pay for all tools sent to them as mandatory tools albeit they do pay cost and from what I noticed is most tools retail at very little above cost unless a dealer marks them up even higher.
With that said i do have factory tools in my tool box and a few home made ones but only because of needing a tool today and not next month....
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Hi 219R
That's exactly what I'm talking about !
Well done !

I did the same as you but with a couple of variations .....

I used a pair of friction plates , bolted together with spacers in between and
drilled a couple of extra holes so that I could bolt them to my general-purpose
handle ..... that gave me my "Clutch basket holding tool "

Then I did the same with the plain clutch plates , again doubled up and with holes
that matched up with my general-purpose handle ....
.... and that gave me my "Clutch Hub holding tool "

The doubled up arrangement gave more traction AND helped a great deal with keeping
the tool " square" to the job when applying force .

Result ..... 2 tools for the price / work of one !

As you rightly said ......" Necessity is the mother of invention"

Let's all keep these ideas coming .... everyone can benefit from the shared knowledge !
 

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I can't speak for all the tools but, there's plenty of after market alternatives for the tools thatn can be had pretty reasonably. For example, I think your (1) Steering tension tool is only $12.99 from TPO Parts

You can make your own clutch holding tool as you described or buy a generic clutch tool like this one for ~$18


...etcetera
 

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Yea, I mean I don't own one tool that's an OEM service item. There is a HUGE aftermarket tool business and many companies make tools for Ducati's. I made some tools back in the day, but they've all fallen apart over the years of use and I've thrown many of them away. I've found, unless you can machine your own tools, its more cost-effective to buy them over the long term. If you wish to use the tool once or twice, then it doesn't matter. My motto is, time is money and if you're futzing around in the garage making tools that don't last long, you might as well spend the same time making money so you can buy the right tools which last considerably longer. :shrug:
 

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Good work Oldtech. I have a combination of homemade and manufactured tools which allow me to work on most Ducati models.
I have a collection of quite large and impressive factory tools for the old 'bevel' models. Not getting much use these days..
But the modern engine isn't as difficult to dismantle and rebuild as the earlier air-cooled versions in some respects - e.g. the primary drive gear is no longer a taper fit onto the crankshaft, and hence does not need the powerful puller required for the earlier versions.
The "Elastic Nuts" you refer to on the camshafts and half-time shaft are usually referred to as SKF nuts, after the bearing manufacturer. They are actually steel, zinc-plated. You will see the odd one with rust developing.
Keep up the good work. You also might want to check out Motomfg for Ducati tools at a good price. Almost cheaper than making them yourself..

;)
 

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Just finished pulling, and re-installing a primary gear on my 848 (yes it is tapered) had to use these two badboys.

20140910_190745 (1).jpg
 

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OK. Another difference between the 848 and the larger versions. (I haven't been that far into the 848). The larger engine employs a straight spline for this gear. It just slips off easily.
Getting the gear off the tapered models can get a bit exciting. I've had them jump almost a metre from the bike with a loud bang!
 

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Oh when this one "popped", it scared the shit out of me!!! Tightening the nut was why I had to use the "cresant shaped flywheel holder,... I always love the guys who replace the flywheels with super lightweight units that have the recesses machined down, and then have to remove a 350nm alternator nut, or for that matter, tighten the primary thru the crankshaft to 190nm.... makes my day!!!
 
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