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Discussion Starter #21
I agree with BLUEY, and I'm sure a recall or a bulletin is coming in the near future. The number of bikes that are still should not be stalling. I unerstand that new production bikes may exhibit issues but stalling. Of all the problems that could go wrong, why stalling?
 

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yes my husband was nearly killed on sat, his bikes done 70 miles he was going around laurel bank when it stalled, its a sharpe bend it caused him to go straight into two oncomming vechicles he went over one and under the other, he will be in hospital for 4 weeks he was in surgery for 9 hrs on sunday, I am so mad that someone somewere knew that there were problems.

its at the testing centre at the moment, but its going to ducati dealership overhere for a full diagonostic.

will let every on know how we got on

be careful,
 

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you know i wish i had made my husband read this i think there will definetly be a recall now, ducati will have to admit theres a problem he nearly died, he got his bkie on the 19 4 2007, rode it for the first time on sat, he was out with my son, he was going around a sharp bend( laurel bank) and hit two cars, i dont know how he survied but he did, i hope this doesnt happen to anyone one else, its been a nightmare,it is getting a full diagnostic test with police presence! and ather independant person,will let every one know
 

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That is horrible and a definite unnecessary risk. Where you located? Also where did you get the bike from? Has anyone contacted Ducati and what has been their response?
You probably have a million other things to worry about right now!



There is another individual in California that I have been speaking with about a similar incident but luckily there were no injuries.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
The stalling issue is so bad that so many people are already selling their 1098's shortly after taking delivery.
 

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MANX;

I am truely sorry for what you are going through. I had a 2005 999 that Ducati had to buy back due to the 9 sereies bike stalling issue which is the same as the 1098. A bike that stalls like the Ducati superbikes have been is not safe and I can not believe that people are reading these reviews and still eagerly waiting for their 1098 to come in. I do not own a 1098 but I was waiting to see it and hear the owner reviews and it is just outrageous that Ducati let this bike out knowing of this problem.

Ducati came out with the 1098 with the idea that it would boost the label which it has for this quarter but I am afraid that this may be the straw that brakes the camels back.

For all of the 1098 owners out there; good luck. The only thing out there worse that a stalling Ducati superbike is Ducati customer service. For everyone in North America contact Daniel at DNA and say that you will not take this sitting down. There is no reason that this should be happening.

Be safe, lissen to MANX's story and learn that you all should probably not be riding these bikes until a fix is found.
 

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Manx,

Sorry to hear about your husband's accident - hope he recovers quickly!

Would this be a worrying first for the stalling problem? Every report we've seen so far seems to indicate it only happens in neutral or first gear, either at standstill or going very slowly. My own experience (on a demo bike) was in 1st gear at 5mph.

This could open up a whole new can of worms if it's possible for it to cut out at speed.
 

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I was horrified to read of Manx's husband's accident. Since it is being investigted by the police, I think we should wait for the results of the investigation before we jump to conclusions. I wish him a speedy recovery.

Manx, you only have three posts here. Did you husband post here under a different name? Please tell us more about where you are. Have you notified Ducati about this?

CAG
 

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Posted this under the stalling poll, but thought it was pertinent to this thread as well. I'm pretty new to this list but thinking that it might be a good idea if the stalling issue was consolidated into one "sticky" tread. Thoughts?

Anway. . .

I have a base model with stock "S" exhaust. Stalled only occasionally at first and only at stop lights but now at just over 200 miles it is stalling all the time and on my last ride stalled while moving slowly in first gear and heavy traffic. Had to duck into a parking lot to avoid getting rear-ended. Bike has been parked since and I sent emai to DNA stating the seriousness of the issue and that I needed some action or I would be pursuing a refund through lemon laws and escalating to the US government DOT safety authorities. I'm not bluffing. . . I am sick of this crap!

Anyway, I got a quick response from DNA and they have scheduled with my dealer to take the bike in on Saturday to get it fixed. Will let you all know how it goes.
 

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Stalling

Hi,

My 1098 only stalled whilst it was being run-in, due to Ducati running the bikes rich during the running-in period. Once the first service was done, the mixture was reset and no more stalling. I've since added the full system and ECU/Filter.... again it ticks over all day.... not a single stall.

Jamie UK
 

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kaution321 said:
The stalling issue is so bad that so many people are already selling their 1098's shortly after taking delivery.

I am now going back to the dealer a 4th time after they made some adjustments to the forward cylinder air bleed screw and it stalled again coming home. I too have been worried about an accident. As much as I don't want to do it I will be invoking the lemon law after 1 more attempt to fix the bike. I cannot enjoy my ride with this problem in the back of my mind. I'll be damned if I am gonna sell and potentially take a loss. I really just want it to be fixed.
 

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I have had my base 1098 (no exhaust mods) for about a month and I have around 900 miles on it. About 600 of those miles were on the street and 300 on the track. I have not had a single stall. Clearly stalling is not happening to all of the bikes, however, I am still very concerned about this issue, particularly with stalling in gears higher than 1st. Since I will be riding the bike on the track very often, the last thing I need to be thinking about in turn 1 after a 160+ MPH straight is stalling!

My Questions are: How many bikes stall right away vs. after the first breakin period? and How many bikes stall in gears above first?
 

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I have a quick question:

I have 400 miles on my Standard Duc. If it didn't really stall now, will it start stalling later?
 

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1098 Impression and about that stallling...

Another one for the list here... took ownership of my 1098 standard back in March. Haven't quite had the weather to get through the break in mileage yet, but I have definitely experienced the stalling. The bike just flat out quits, and on the restart it cranks as if it the battery is low. Thought I was going to be calling in a buddy with a trailer a couples times. But the bike always restarted. More on this later...



About The bike to those 1098 hopefuls...



I live in a congested area with average speeds of 25-35 mph. It is clearly apparent that this bike doesn’t like going slow. First sign is when you start to wonder if your ass is on fire or not. That exhaust puts out some serious heat. The clutch is hard-core, a bit of pull for city driving - feels like a really solid component for that power delivery to the rear wheel. Its a give and take, want a good solid clutch that can take some pounding you've got to give a little something up. Just think of the muscles you'll build from using it. The mirrors are the coolest looking I've seen yet on a sportbike, but are also the most useless I've experienced around town. The mirrors work ok when you are in the full tuck position. I recommend getting a couple of mirror bubbles that stick on to help open up your view around you - works like a charm and is essential for city driving. The seating position is dedicated. Very little cushion for your rear and the small tank has little to offer for relieving the stress of weight on your wrists. With regards to all that is noted above - from a race replica, I wouldn't expect any different - this is a Ducati not a Honda. This is the Ferrari of sportbikes... Ducati has always been. Comparing this bike to the Honda's, Yamaha's, Suzuki's etc. is like comparing a Chevy Corvette to a Ferrari 360 Modena. This bike is not for your normal guy. Personally I think motorcyclist should have to produce time and ratings like pilots for various aircrafts before they can ride a given bike. Just isn’t right for a new-bee to be able to jump on a GSXR-1000, R1 or 1098 right out of the box, but that’s whole other discussion.



More on the bike... the transmission is the best I've felt. Shifts are confident and zero clunkiness. Miles past any other bike I've ridden. The brakes will down right throw your ass off. The power delivery is somewhere between a John Deere tractor and an R1 on steroids. Pulling out of turns with that tree stump pulling torque on tap is second to none. Its cheating. On an inline 4, you’re shifting and waiting for that engine to spool up and deliver the torque you need. The Ducati (like all Ducati superbikes) is ready with torque on tap. So what if an inline 4 has 170 hp at 10000 rpm. Who's gonna use that? This bike is an animal - it will eat my R1's lunch and ask for more.



OK - back to that stalling issue...



This seems to be clearly a fuel mixture problem. Again - the bike is not happy with slow driving. Its almost as if the engine just goes on strike and refuses to cooperate with slow speeds period. What I've experienced is when the bike gets to 180+ degrees F. It just revolts. I've experienced stalls at stops and stalls at slow speeds. Its totally predictable to occur any time when the engine temp gets to 180+. This combined with the exhaust temp you can feel on your ass, its obvious the bike is running on the lean side. This is not going to be an easy fix for Ducati. Basically it all comes down to how much control the ECU really has with regards to the engine sensors. Can the ECU compensate fuel mixture with regards to engine temperature combined with rear wheel speed? What I expect for Ducati to come up with is a new fuel map that is more of a happy medium for the everyday condition. Its apparent that Ducati squeezed as much power out of this engine as possible and are using an aggressive fuel mixture. You can adjust for best performance which is typically towards the lean side, or you can adjust for the every day which is on the rich side. The JAP bikes are always on the rich side out of the crate. This is why you get so much performance from a good re-map and aftermarket exhaust on the JAP bikes. Ideally, Ducati may be able get the ECU to do some more thinking... this meaning that if engine temperature gets above X and out-put sprocket speed is below Y (rear wheel speed), the mixture will richen up automatically. Something like that. Sounds simple - it is, but if the ECU wasn’t designed to handle this kind of logical thinking then it wont work. A fuel map is just a set of raw data values that the ECU uses to set the mixture. Basically the ECU needs to compute extra data in the map. This is like having a plug with 3 prongs and you’re trying to put it into an outlet with only 2 prongs. It just wont work. Now I could be wrong, Ducati designers might not have painted them selves into a corner here when they selected this ECU, but I have my doubts. No other manufactures use ECUs in this way to my knowledge. There may be an aftermarket ECU that likely does have this capability, but I don’t know of any. The other option here which is available is an ECU that allows you to keep multiple maps on tap. Basically, if you know you’re going to be tooling around town, you switch to the map that is more friendly for that kind of riding. On the other side - if you know you are going to be hauling ass, then you want to switch to the high performance map. The powercommander and yoshimira ECUs can do this. There are many other limiting and impacting factors here not noted that is helping cause this issue, like the head design, its compression ratio, fuel type used… the list goes on. All things combined is causing this issue. FYI - Throwing on a full race exhaust isn’t the answer here. It could help for a minute… when you do that it increases the flow of exhaust gases out of the engine and may help keep that temp down a little longer. But with a new mapping, you’ll likely have the same problem if you had it before you changed the exhaust. There some very fine tuning to be done here to get the bike running in moped mode around town.



So to wrap this long ass posting up... I recommend the 1098 to any hopeful out there. Its a truly awesome ride. The stalling will be an issue as long as Ducati uses the same map and you ride the bike in slow conditions. Any map they release that fixes the stalling will rob some of that horsepower... guaranteed. I'm sure the Ducati engineers are hard at work trying to find that happy medium right now. This bike was created to make performance numbers and just go fast, driving it around like a moped isn’t what they had in mind. Take all of this with a grain of salt, this is all just my opinion... I've made no contact with Ducati and at this time don’t really plan too. In addition I am not an expert by no stretch. Just wanted to offer some more insight to the problem and give credit to a great bike.



Keep the rubber side down...



Steve

Mechanical Engineer
 

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Steve, do you know if the ECU that came with the Termis would have a different mapping?
 

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Discussion Starter #36
I'm sure Ducati engineers are trying to come up with a fix, just a matter of when? After all, CEO of Ducati stated that this engine has been tested and retested longer than any other Ducati engines in history. But, i just think they forgot to test the other components that came with the bike.
 

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bikepilot said:
...this is a Ducati not a Honda. This is the Ferrari of sportbikes... Ducati has always been. Comparing this bike to the Honda's, Yamaha's, Suzuki's etc. is like comparing a Chevy Corvette to a Ferrari 360 Modena. This bike is not for your normal guy.


At $15K, the 1098 is a "production" motorcycle; nothing more, nothing less. Stop making excuses and start demanding solutions.



bikepilot said:
...So what if an inline 4 has 170 hp at 10000 rpm. Who's gonna use that? This bike is an animal - it will eat my R1's lunch and ask for more.


This statement is nonsensical.


bikepilot said:
Throwing on a full race exhaust isn’t the answer here. It could help for a minute… when you do that it increases the flow of exhaust gases out of the engine and may help keep that temp down a little longer. But with a new mapping, you’ll likely have the same problem if you had it before you changed the exhaust. There some very fine tuning to be done here to get the bike running in moped mode around town.


Installing full Termis "is" one answer, but not the final answer owners should expect from Ducati.


bikepilot said:
Any map they release that fixes the stalling will rob some of that horsepower... guaranteed.


All the described stalling seems to involve idle to off-idle mixture only. Resolving this will not effect the rest of the power band.
 

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bikepilot said:
Another one for the list here... took ownership of my 1098 standard back in March. Haven't quite had the weather to get through the break in mileage yet, but I have definitely experienced the stalling. The bike just flat out quits, and on the restart it cranks as if it the battery is low. Thought I was going to be calling in a buddy with a trailer a couples times. But the bike always restarted. More on this later...



About The bike to those 1098 hopefuls...



I live in a congested area with average speeds of 25-35 mph. It is clearly apparent that this bike doesn’t like going slow. First sign is when you start to wonder if your ass is on fire or not. That exhaust puts out some serious heat. The clutch is hard-core, a bit of pull for city driving - feels like a really solid component for that power delivery to the rear wheel. Its a give and take, want a good solid clutch that can take some pounding you've got to give a little something up. Just think of the muscles you'll build from using it. The mirrors are the coolest looking I've seen yet on a sportbike, but are also the most useless I've experienced around town. The mirrors work ok when you are in the full tuck position. I recommend getting a couple of mirror bubbles that stick on to help open up your view around you - works like a charm and is essential for city driving. The seating position is dedicated. Very little cushion for your rear and the small tank has little to offer for relieving the stress of weight on your wrists. With regards to all that is noted above - from a race replica, I wouldn't expect any different - this is a Ducati not a Honda. This is the Ferrari of sportbikes... Ducati has always been. Comparing this bike to the Honda's, Yamaha's, Suzuki's etc. is like comparing a Chevy Corvette to a Ferrari 360 Modena. This bike is not for your normal guy. Personally I think motorcyclist should have to produce time and ratings like pilots for various aircrafts before they can ride a given bike. Just isn’t right for a new-bee to be able to jump on a GSXR-1000, R1 or 1098 right out of the box, but that’s whole other discussion.



More on the bike... the transmission is the best I've felt. Shifts are confident and zero clunkiness. Miles past any other bike I've ridden. The brakes will down right throw your ass off. The power delivery is somewhere between a John Deere tractor and an R1 on steroids. Pulling out of turns with that tree stump pulling torque on tap is second to none. Its cheating. On an inline 4, you’re shifting and waiting for that engine to spool up and deliver the torque you need. The Ducati (like all Ducati superbikes) is ready with torque on tap. So what if an inline 4 has 170 hp at 10000 rpm. Who's gonna use that? This bike is an animal - it will eat my R1's lunch and ask for more.



OK - back to that stalling issue...



This seems to be clearly a fuel mixture problem. Again - the bike is not happy with slow driving. Its almost as if the engine just goes on strike and refuses to cooperate with slow speeds period. What I've experienced is when the bike gets to 180+ degrees F. It just revolts. I've experienced stalls at stops and stalls at slow speeds. Its totally predictable to occur any time when the engine temp gets to 180+. This combined with the exhaust temp you can feel on your ass, its obvious the bike is running on the lean side. This is not going to be an easy fix for Ducati. Basically it all comes down to how much control the ECU really has with regards to the engine sensors. Can the ECU compensate fuel mixture with regards to engine temperature combined with rear wheel speed? What I expect for Ducati to come up with is a new fuel map that is more of a happy medium for the everyday condition. Its apparent that Ducati squeezed as much power out of this engine as possible and are using an aggressive fuel mixture. You can adjust for best performance which is typically towards the lean side, or you can adjust for the every day which is on the rich side. The JAP bikes are always on the rich side out of the crate. This is why you get so much performance from a good re-map and aftermarket exhaust on the JAP bikes. Ideally, Ducati may be able get the ECU to do some more thinking... this meaning that if engine temperature gets above X and out-put sprocket speed is below Y (rear wheel speed), the mixture will richen up automatically. Something like that. Sounds simple - it is, but if the ECU wasn’t designed to handle this kind of logical thinking then it wont work. A fuel map is just a set of raw data values that the ECU uses to set the mixture. Basically the ECU needs to compute extra data in the map. This is like having a plug with 3 prongs and you’re trying to put it into an outlet with only 2 prongs. It just wont work. Now I could be wrong, Ducati designers might not have painted them selves into a corner here when they selected this ECU, but I have my doubts. No other manufactures use ECUs in this way to my knowledge. There may be an aftermarket ECU that likely does have this capability, but I don’t know of any. The other option here which is available is an ECU that allows you to keep multiple maps on tap. Basically, if you know you’re going to be tooling around town, you switch to the map that is more friendly for that kind of riding. On the other side - if you know you are going to be hauling ass, then you want to switch to the high performance map. The powercommander and yoshimira ECUs can do this. There are many other limiting and impacting factors here not noted that is helping cause this issue, like the head design, its compression ratio, fuel type used… the list goes on. All things combined is causing this issue. FYI - Throwing on a full race exhaust isn’t the answer here. It could help for a minute… when you do that it increases the flow of exhaust gases out of the engine and may help keep that temp down a little longer. But with a new mapping, you’ll likely have the same problem if you had it before you changed the exhaust. There some very fine tuning to be done here to get the bike running in moped mode around town.



So to wrap this long ass posting up... I recommend the 1098 to any hopeful out there. Its a truly awesome ride. The stalling will be an issue as long as Ducati uses the same map and you ride the bike in slow conditions. Any map they release that fixes the stalling will rob some of that horsepower... guaranteed. I'm sure the Ducati engineers are hard at work trying to find that happy medium right now. This bike was created to make performance numbers and just go fast, driving it around like a moped isn’t what they had in mind. Take all of this with a grain of salt, this is all just my opinion... I've made no contact with Ducati and at this time don’t really plan too. In addition I am not an expert by no stretch. Just wanted to offer some more insight to the problem and give credit to a great bike.



Keep the rubber side down...



Steve

Mechanical Engineer
:yo:
 

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My dealer called yesterday and said they were getting a new ECU for me....the base model has a non-programmable ECU. The new one will either have a new map or be totally programmable. But I would think if it's only a new map it would be a SW fix not a new ECU...say it's for a lean condition at idle. I too don't think correcting a lean idle condition should affect the entire power band.
 

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Total BS here....got my bike service for the 1000 km. I looked at the bill...$600 cdn WOW ! for an oil change !!! the girl at the desk told me that they had to do all kind of test and adjustment for a total of 4.5 or 5.5 hrs...not sure , anyway, I spook with the manager and he reduce it by haft....still $300 cdn.

And for that price I have more stalling than before ! 6 time coming back home !

The good new is...in 3 weeks, I will have a new ECU; that what it take to get parts from Italy they told me.

Just ridiculous !
 
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