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Discussion Starter #1
So hello to all the Ducati fans. I have been bitten by the bug, want to buy a 996 that I found, it has 3,500 miles, all looks good on it. Just one concern I am 35 and last time I rode a bike was for about 20 minutes when I was 19 (Ninja 250), so here is the question, is this bike to much for a beginner? I am not planning on going crazy with it right of the bat, but hope to become a strong rider, I am 5'7, 200 lbs. and I plan on taking a riding class ASAP if I end up getting the bike. Any advice? By the way I live in San Diego area.
 

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As a new rider you'll find the Duc superbikes don't like to cooperate by putting along and riding at low speeds. They need to be put under load and at higher speeds.

But,, if 'you like you buy'.

I'd pickup the Duc and also something uber cheap for your first couple months of re learning then sell it. Meanwhile the Duc will be in your garage taunting you to ride it.
 
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As a counter point: my first bike was a cbr 900. Most bikes fit in a category of weight from 350 to 500lbs (not including supermotards and your grandpas Goldwing)

That being said I don't think any bike is "too much" for anyone. There's a thing called a throttle for a reason just because it has power doesn't mean you have to use it. Ride within your limits and you'll be fine BUT ducatis as previously stated don't like putting around so keep that in mind. I say forgo the learner and buy the 996.
 

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Many similar threads try doing a search
 

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Discussion Starter #8
No, I wasn't getting any quick responses, so I thought maybe I posted in the wrong group. Got a bit of an itchy finger here. lol.
 

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At 5 ft 7 make sure that seat height won't be a problem before you buy. Superbikes have limited low speed maneuverability/steering lock-to-lock, so as a new rider factor that into your final decision.

That said, my advice is buy the bike you love, everything else is secondary.

Nevertheless, if you’re new to motorcycling or just a returning rider, there’s a number of factors to consider when deciding what’s the best bike for you.

A superbike or sportbike is designed to perform like a racebike. A sport touring bike is designed to give good handling and performance without sacrificing too much rider and passenger comfort. A cruiser or touring style bike is more comfortable still.

A superbike’s superior handling is achieved by a geometry that gives better weight distribution. This forces the rider into a folded forward position on the bike. The handle bars are placed low and forward which puts more of the riders weight on the front wheel and achieves an overall lower center of gravity. This allows the rider to tuck in behind a small windscreen to achieve better aerodynamics as well.

Compared to the other designs, a superbike is simply not as comfortable, so complaints of numb fingers, sore backs, sore wrists and necks are common. Fatigue on long trips is a concern.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for the sound advice

Thanks everybody, appreciate the advice. I will definatley look into this further, but honestly if the funds work out I am getting it. I will be sure to take the riding courses, and love the track idea. If anyway possible I will get a ninja 250, and practice on it, but if not just invest the money into training.


:drummer: keep :drummer:ing
 

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still on the riding part..
After years of experience with competitive mountain biking and the few <1 hr times I'd been on a dirt bike in the lest 15 years I put an 848 on order and crossed my fingers.
While I was waiting I borrowed a freinds suzuki with comperable power and found that I was going to kill myself. I quickly picked up a 696 monster and found that even that at 80 hp was more than enough to get myself in alot of trouble fast. The big issues with these bikes is that their most benficial features are hazardous to those who are just learning.
Great throttle response and power means that untill you work on that fine tuned throttle skil, you'l likely be chopping the throttle on and off causing the bike to react poorly
terrific braking power- while at 100 mph is a requirement, touching a little brake at low speed will put you on the pavement untill you learn how to properly modulate them.
precise weight distribution- means the bike will handle like no other, but the agressive position that seems sporty on the stand, can be intimidating when you're at speed, not to mention you're visibility and your ability to be seen is reduced in traffic.

Take the msf course! then get on something small to apply your new knowledge at actual road speeds, then start expirementing with the big bike. Thankfully the 848 took forever to get an I had some time to learn before I got it, and it's still way too much bike for my skill level. If you find a great deal on a 996/998/999 get it, but also find something disposable to get your braking and throttle skills down a bit before you dive into the deep end of the pool.
 

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what would be a good deal on a 1999 Ducati 999, with 3,500 miles.
Good deal depends on where you're located, the season, and the condition of the bike. I just saw a low mileage 999r for 15k at my local dealer in beautiful condition, but that was a $30k bike six years ago.
 

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what would be a good deal on a 1999 Ducati 999, with 3,500 miles.
There is no such thing......but know what your talking about. :laughing: I wouldn't pay any more then $6500 at the max top price - and then only if it had some extras.


My first bike was a 750 Ducati Paso - nothing super fast - but it gave me the 'bug'. I now have a '99-996 and I always wonder why I didn't get that first instead. Theres no replacement for displacement. Take your time and you'll love it.

I'm 5'10" 175lbs. - I think your a good size for a 996. My only real advise is be careful on it when you take riding classes...it has a "0" turning radius.
 

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when i had an inspection done pre purchase on my 996 they said it had too much oil in engine and as they didnt ask if i wanted some out have been drivig it ok. it registers on the mark with dipstick and also showing full on the dashboard dipstick.
is this okay to run with as im driving to devon tomorrow and dont want to do any damage to engine. do these engines use much oil ?
 

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not sure why you started 2 threads on the same thing. it's a great way to piss people off on forums... what I said in your other thread funnily enough applies equally to this one.

you have zero riding experience (i'm sorry but one ride for 20 min, 16 years ago does not count). you need to develop basic road skills and that will be hard.

here's my post from the other thread.

look, it is a tough bike to learn on since you basically have no prior riding experience at all. 20mins total in a life doesn't really count.

do the course FIRST before you buy anything. see how you feel on their loan bikes.

it may be a good idea to get something cheap to learn on for 6 months. the good thing is the learner market is strong so buying a 250ninja you can ride it for 6 months and probably sell it for what you paid for it.

the problems with the 996 are:

very heavy - being 200kg vs ~150kg for a ninja etc means those little 'oh crap, nearly dropped it' moments on the ninja will instead be a 'damn, I just dropped my bike' moment with the ducati

very little steering lock - means very hard to manoeuvre at slow speed and park etc which might lead to the problem above

high seat height - means less easy to get both feet flat on the ground and being up high makes it easier to tip over if you lose momentum or find yourself on un-even ground where you can't get your foot down

low handlebars (clipons) - this puts more strain on your back and wrists (combined with the high seat) and also puts you in more of a race riding position (means you can't see as well around you). as a new riding you'll be gripping the bars super tight and will get very sore wrists/hands and back.

tricky controls and clutch - super heavy clutch which is also pretty grabby, also being a heavy bike makes it trickier to do smooth take offs when learning.

bike is very jerky/rough at low speed - again, not an issue on the ninja but on the ducati they take some finese to ride smoothly under 30km/h as the 996 gearing puts you at quite low rpm in first or second gear at such speeds and the thing will clack/buck/stall on you without some skill.

very expensive body panels - a new genuine side fairing (just 1 of the 2 pieces on each side) is about $1500... you can buy a whole ninja for not much more than that...

chances are if you get it as a learner bike you will drop it and buying genuine replacement parts to restore it to it's former glory will be very bloody expensive. that stuff is a non-issue on the ninja and you'll be less likely to drop it too.

plus, people stop and stare at a 996. do you want them looking at you as you do your very first hill start? or your first drop in a car-park, or the first time you realise the bikes too heavy for you to easily manoeuvre into a parking spot etc? nothing worse than being 'that guy' on the shiny 1000CC superbike who can't really ride it properly.

look if you really must have a 996 now by all means do it. but my advice would be at least get 6 months riding experience before you grab the most beautiful 1000cc superbike ever made.
 

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I have to agree with the Baron.

The Ducati superbikes are not very forgiving of the small mistakes so commonly made by inexperienced riders. I had a 12 year break from riding but even with extensive experience prior to that (15 years both tar and dirt... including competitive off road cross country riding and drag racing) I still felt like a beginner on the 996 when I returned to riding at 40yo.

By all means buy the 996... however I urge you just as previous posters have, to buy a cheap beater to master the basic skills on. These skills are vital to help you stay upright when the unexpected surprises that are part of riding happen.
 

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Hey duclover, listen to what the generous folk have already offered.
The 996 would look great in your lounge but you would be a fkn idiot to actually ride one on the road with your admitted lack of riding experience.
Not so much worried about you. I am however concerned for all the innocents you might harm in your pursuit to ride such a bike,(which is after all a "race " bike with lights).
One more time, please get some experience, off road preferably.
Riding a dirt bike...often... will give you spills and skills, and maybe just save your arse.

ps. a 1999 996 is woth what you want to pay for it.
 
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