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Discussion Starter #1
Is there a future for American's in the premier class of motorcycle racing?

This is a question I pondered after watching Nicky Hayden, pretty much slam his own country during the press conference at the INDY GP. It was absolutely amazing to hear him say it how it is, no sugar coating it, no real forward thinking, just the facts as they are. He clearly understands what's going on here, but the future is very fuzzy.

A few facts we already know: Colin Edwards, Nicky Hayden and Ben Spies were all hired after winning superbike championships of one kind or another. Outside of Nicky Hayden's consistency in 06 which led to a title, the other two "champions" never really showed their worth in the premier class. Prior to those guys, there was Kenny Roberts JR, who was the last American to work his way up through the lower ranks and into the premier class. Even he, didn't have any domination, he won when he could and was more consistent (like Nicky) then his competitor, rookie Valentino Rossi.

So the question here is, what will it take for an American to become Champion?

The stage is set
Take a moment and think
Lets discuss

:)
 

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Is there a future for American's in the premier class of motorcycle racing?

This is a question I pondered after watching Nicky Hayden, pretty much slam his own country during the press conference at the INDY GP. It was absolutely amazing to hear him say it how it is, no sugar coating it, no real forward thinking, just the facts as they are. He clearly understands what's going on here, but the future is very fuzzy.

A few facts we already know: Colin Edwards, Nicky Hayden and Ben Spies were all hired after winning superbike championships of one kind or another. Outside of Nicky Hayden's consistency in 06 which led to a title, the other two "champions" never really showed their worth in the premier class. Prior to those guys, there was Kenny Roberts JR, who was the last American to work his way up through the lower ranks and into the premier class. Even he, didn't have any domination, he won when he could and was more consistent (like Nicky) then his competitor, rookie Valentino Rossi.

So the question here is, what will it take for an American to become Champion?

The stage is set
Take a moment and think
Lets discuss

:)
I think it's more likely Bob will be the next US world champion.

:popcorn:
 

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Developing successful future competitors has the same requirements for development as any other sport. There has the be the infrastructure at a young age to support youth wanting to compete. Parents have to want to get their kids involved. There also has to be a monetarily rewarding and competitive league for professionals. This means that the American public has to be interested and spend money to watch racing, buy merchandise, which in turn gets more corporate sponsors involved, which leads to more spending, the cycle continues.

Overall, racing in the US, outside of NASCAR, isn't closely followed. Much like Football (soccer) the American public just doesn't show quite the interest in the professional leagues like they do in the NFL, NBA, PGA, Baseball, etc.

If look at population numbers the US has the pool to draw from to produce significantly more talented racers than the European countries that dominate the sport. But, producing successful athletes relies heavily on the sports favored by the country, and often times the average income. The US gives two shits about cricket, but if we decided that it was the game to play we would most likely dominate the sport within a few decades. The average income of a country also affects the growth of a sport and therefore the talent that it produces. China has something around 20% of the worlds population, but sports are leisure activities and the more people below the poverty line the fewer that have the chance to develop possible talent in sports, particularly a very expensive one like racing.

So:

The steps for growth aren't taken individually, rather they each feed off one another.

Get the general pop interested.

Get youth involved.

Develop a rewarding professional league.

All leading to -> Beating the shit out of our friends across the pond :D
 

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Australia has next to zero interest in motorcycle racing, this is displayed in the poor attendance of MotoGP and lesser classes. Yet, Australia has produced some of the best racers ever seen on a bike and with a far smaller population pool.

Must be sad for you guys constantly getting beaten by some island country with a tenth of the population. And if we don't win, we'll pull a Marcus Ambrose and smack you in the chops :stickpoke
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Australia has next to zero interest in motorcycle racing, this is displayed in the poor attendance of MotoGP and lesser classes. Yet, Australia has produced some of the best racers ever seen on a bike and with a far smaller population pool.
In the cause of Australia, you're right on the nose. Less interest, so people have no way of being successful there, so they leave at a younger age. Spend their teenage years in Spain or Italy running those series, to eventually make it into Moto3 like Jack Miller is doing today.
 

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The US gives two shits about cricket, but if we decided that it was the[/] game to play we would most likely dominate the sport within a few decades.

All leading to -> Beating the shit out of our friends across the pond :D


Now those ARE fighting words..

:BoomSmilie_anim: :rlwhore:
 

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Now those ARE fighting words..

:BoomSmilie_anim: :rlwhore:
Shots fired, shots fired.

I was primarily talking about the other smaller pond ;).

The US is lucky in that we have a large population and most of that population has the money/leisure time to dedicate to sports. The thing is, we focus on sports that the rest of the world (generally) could give two shits about. It's sad because my favorite sports receive the least attention: football(soccer), motorcycle track racing, and paintball.

If you look at the sports we do care for we fare well in international competition. Even in the Olympics we rack up gold medals. Is it because we're better? Often times not. We just have the funds to dump into training programs for young athletes. I'm not saying we're better, we just simply have the numbers and the $$.

I really like you fellas from other continents, you have the proper taste in what constitutes a good sport.
 

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In the cause of Australia, you're right on the nose. Less interest, so people have no way of being successful there, so they leave at a younger age. Spend their teenage years in Spain or Italy running those series, to eventually make it into Moto3 like Jack Miller is doing today.
Yeah, cause that's what Campbell, Ahearn, Phillis, Carruthers, Findlay, Hansford, Gardner, Magee, Doohan, Beattie, Corser, Bayliss all did didn't they? Douchebag. All successful at home and abroad. And plenty more who did it in WSBK, BSB & AMA as well. And although I'm suitably biased - None better than the (late) great Gregg Hansford

Apologies to any other past Australian champions who I probably missed who also raced at the highest level without spending a day in Spain let alone their teenage years.

Trying thinking before you type - your probably not the best placed to pass expert opinion on the path travelled of the many champions to come out of Australia.
 

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Yeah, cause that's what Campbell, Ahearn, Phillis, Carruthers, Findlay, Hansford, Gardner, Magee, Doohan, Beattie, Corser, Bayliss all did didn't they?
Who??


Just kidding! :p
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
All successful at home and abroad. And plenty more who did it in WSBK, BSB & AMA as well.
Your right, there were a few riders back in the 2 stroke era who made it through from domestic series into the big leagues and won championships in the premiere class of the 500's.

The world is a different place today and I bought up this subject because it seems almost impossible for someone outside of the series, to break through and be a champion in the premiere class of MotoGP, without going through the smaller ranks.

Stoner's biography is worth reading, discussing in great detail how hard it is in Australia to make it through the ranks due to minimal age restrictions and lack of talent scouts like in CIV.
 

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Your right, there were a few riders back in the 2 stroke era who made it through from domestic series into the big leagues and won championships in the premiere class of the 500's.

The world is a different place today and I bought up this subject because it seems almost impossible for someone outside of the series, to break through and be a champion in the premiere class of MotoGP, without going through the smaller ranks.

Stoner's biography is worth reading, discussing in great detail how hard it is in Australia to make it through the ranks due to minimal age restrictions and lack of talent scouts like in CIV.
You should of stopped at your right.

Stoner only left due to age, not a lack of talent scouts. If you have any questions for him, forget the book, I'll just ask him. It's a smal country.
 

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You should of stopped at your right.

Stoner only left due to age, not a lack of talent scouts. If you have any questions for him, forget the book, I'll just ask him. It's a smal country.
You'll probably find him on some lake, in a fishing boat.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Stoner only left due to age, not a lack of talent scouts..
Marquez wouldn't be racing right now without a talent scout helping him out. Had there been talent scouts like that in Australia, Stoner's parents wouldn't have had to sell everything in order to move to Europe.

I know you hang out with Stoner every day, but his autobiography talks all about that as being a huge problem living in Australia.
 

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What a load of horse shit. Marquez never got near a talent scout in his life. His dad put them in the window for Alzamora and he and his brother have been groomed by Monlau for HRC ever since.

It's amazing the bullshit Walter Mitty will continue to talk when he thinks that the people who actually have a clue are not around to call him out on it.

Scouts do nothing in this sport, it's not football. Riders make their own fortune by getting themselves into a series where they are noticed by teams. Which is why GP wannabees do to CEV and superbike aspirants go to BSB.


This prick does not know his arse from his elbow when it comes to international racing yet he's allowed to perpetuate it despite the site owners knowing he's full of it.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I consider a "mentor" the same as "scout". They are people out looking for talent and open doors for their future.

"In 2004 he moved up to the 125cc class in the Catalan Championship and finished the season second overall. It was also the year that Marquez met Emilio Alzamora, the man who would later become Marquez’s mentor and manager."

By the way, we're done with the potty mouth anger around here.
 

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are you done tye? You were also ignoring me. but here you are again. Tired of my potty mouth. have me banned. because you are a spineless, clueless cunt.

and just because you consider shit the same as food does not mean that anyone else in the real world has to eat it. Your warped perception will not allow you to win an argument. We've been over this before, You can't change the laws of standard perception to win an argument. That's narcissistic personality disorder.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Directly from Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scout_(sport)
wikipedia said:
Scouts are experienced talent evaluators who travel extensively for the purposes of watching athletes play their chosen sports and determining whether their set of skills and talents represent what is needed by the scout's organization. Many scouts are former coaches or retired players, while others have made a career just of being scouts.
Isn't Emilio a former 125 champion? Doesn't he manage the Estrella Galicia team? Isn't he the director of the Monlau Competition technical school? Doesn't he want to find the next big stars of the sport and put them on the path to success? Emilio Alzamora - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

So yes, he pretty much is a scout who turned mentor.
 
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