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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys! just bought a 2008 848 from a close friend of mine. Super excited to have joined the community!

A little history on the bike, its a 2008 ducati 848, it has about 6300 miles on it and never had value adjustment done. Oil change normally.

I just have a couple of questions for the seasoned riders and owners of their 848, I noticed when i am in first gear and rolling around 5-10 mph the bike feels like its choking and that it'll just stall on me. Is this normal? my friend told me it's because the bike doesnt like being slow? i just find it weird cause i never had that on a R6

I am also a very small person, about 5'5 and weight about 130? what would you guys recommend me do in-terms of suspension wise? is there a spring that i can get and install and have it adjusted for my weight?
 

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I'd get the valves checked, just to be sure (and belt replacement) they're most likely in tolerances, but it's worth the piece of mind. That's completely normal for the bike. Going to a 14t front sprocket helps a little and really wakes the bike up performance wise. Suspension wise, I'd get it professionally dialed in first and take it from there. I'm not sure what type of riding you intend on doing or where you plan on taking the bike (you can just add slip ons or you can go balls out and put a ton of money into these). Congrats on the new purchase and welcome to the forum.
 

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Just feather the clutch at low speeds or coast. If you are not accelerating at low speeds she's gonna buck you because she wants to go!
Welcome aboard!
 
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Another suggestion, slightly off topic for what you were asking, but related...if you are going to be doing a lot of stop and go riding or have the potential to get stuck in traffic, meaning you are going to be on the clutch often, you may want to consider upgrading your clutch slave. Eases the clutch pull by about 30% (going from memory here, one of the senior members posted a good chart on it).

Fairly inexpensive, easy to do and made traffic more tolerable for me.
 

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If you choose to ignore the belt warning above...

A 2008 848 should be on its third set of belts.
If you are still on the original belts, you are using the engine on borrowed time.
Belts and tools are under 200.00 and you can easily do it yourself.
That is more affordable than replacing a couple of cylinders.
That rear cylinder gets really hot with less cooling and that belt takes more abuse than the front.

Also, going down on the front sprocket is not the right advice. It is the cheapest fix.
The proper thing to do is go up on the rear sprocket. Two or three teeth up on the rear will really wake up the bike.
Going down a tooth on the front will stress the chain and counter-shaft creating accelerated wear which translates into more money in the future.
 

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My 2008 848 is fixing to roll 20k miles. I put 28k miles on my 2005 749...do other people not ride these things?????
 

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I wonder if this is because people switch out for aftermarket levers? I don't have any problem with the pull on the stocker :flat:
the aftermarket slave cylinders require alot less pressure to activate the clutch,... see member "Shazzams" chart somewhere posted on the Forum... I have an EVR with a Brembo Billet Master Cylinder and can use my index finger.....
 

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My 2008 848 is fixing to roll 20k miles. I put 28k miles on my 2005 749...do other people not ride these things?????
Sadly they don't get ridden like they should but it's a luxury piece for a lot of people so only ridden when fancied.

Myself........my 08 848 should roll over 100,000kms by season end this Oct.
 

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For me it was not that it was difficult to pull the lever while riding, but over and over in traffic would start to wear out my left hand/forearm. Taking away some of the pressure eases that, but yes, I do have aftermarket shorty's too, and that did factor into my decision to change the slave.

Like I said, just a suggestion...it worked for me, so I thought I would throw it out there...says his location is Queens, I imagine he will get stuck in traffic regularly.

...or maybe I just need to go to the gym :conveyer:
 

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Also, going down on the front sprocket is not the right advice. It is the cheapest fix.
The proper thing to do is go up on the rear sprocket. Two or three teeth up on the rear will really wake up the bike.
Going down a tooth on the front will stress the chain and counter-shaft creating accelerated wear which translates into more money in the future.
I have experimented with 41t and 43t rear sprockets (I left my front sprocket stock, like Mike refers to here). I believe the 41t is a good balance. It makes the bike 'peppier' and doesn't limit you as much on the top-end like the 43t does. With the 43t installed I could barely get halfway down the back straight at Mid-Ohio before all three rev-limiter lights came on. If you're not going to be riding on the track, this probably isn't an issue. My preference and all around final drive recommendation would be 15/41... EDIT: and I just passed 23k miles...
 

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Bigger on the back is the equivalent of going smaller on the front. I think the ratio is: down 1 tooth in the front = 2.8 teeth in the rear. I went with 15-41 which is very close to stock ratio but allows for longer chain and turning the eccentric as far as it will go without moving the rear brake mount. 42 in the rear would be slightly taller gearing than stock.
 

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Going more teeth in back would make the front end lift easier?
Yes... I'm sure there are other factors too, regarding the change to the geometry and bike's balance, but with the 43t installed my front end wanted to lift off the pavement while driving hard out of most corners. With the 41t I do not have that issue. The bike is well-planted and power delivery feels optimal.
 

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Large rear sprocket is for hole shot.
Small rear sprocket is for top end.

On the street you are not going to need 150mph.
You will need to keep up with R1 and CBR1KRR. I run 43T.
I never ride over 100mph. There is no where here to go that fast here in the mountains.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Another suggestion, slightly off topic for what you were asking, but related...if you are going to be doing a lot of stop and go riding or have the potential to get stuck in traffic, meaning you are going to be on the clutch often, you may want to consider upgrading your clutch slave. Eases the clutch pull by about 30% (going from memory here, one of the senior members posted a good chart on it).

Fairly inexpensive, easy to do and made traffic more tolerable for me.
Yeah i would definitely love to consider it? if you dont mind PMing me some more info i would definitely love to get this done. i really only use the bike to commute into the city so its a lot of stop and go traffic

If you choose to ignore the belt warning above...

A 2008 848 should be on its third set of belts.
If you are still on the original belts, you are using the engine on borrowed time.
Belts and tools are under 200.00 and you can easily do it yourself.
That is more affordable than replacing a couple of cylinders.
That rear cylinder gets really hot with less cooling and that belt takes more abuse than the front.

Also, going down on the front sprocket is not the right advice. It is the cheapest fix.
The proper thing to do is go up on the rear sprocket. Two or three teeth up on the rear will really wake up the bike.
Going down a tooth on the front will stress the chain and counter-shaft creating accelerated wear which translates into more money in the future.
Any more info on the rear sprocket? is it an easy job i can do?

I wonder if this is because people switch out for aftermarket levers? I don't have any problem with the pull on the stocker :flat:
I do have Aftermarket levers on it, it man after a little while my hand cramps up

I'd get the valves checked, just to be sure (and belt replacement) they're most likely in tolerances, but it's worth the piece of mind. That's completely normal for the bike. Going to a 14t front sprocket helps a little and really wakes the bike up performance wise. Suspension wise, I'd get it professionally dialed in first and take it from there. I'm not sure what type of riding you intend on doing or where you plan on taking the bike (you can just add slip ons or you can go balls out and put a ton of money into these). Congrats on the new purchase and welcome to the forum.
Thankss!
 
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