Ducati.org forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Recently just picked up a 1299 with 300 miles ready for its first oil change/service soon. Well technically second as the dealer I baught it from stated they just changed the oil. I assume oil only no filter due to time frame as it’s a 2017. I will be doing the change myself and changing coolant for the first time as even though it hasn’t moved, it’s time based on service manual.



I have read a lot and seen multiple videos of Threebond being used on drain plug and Loctite being used on Oil filter cap.
I am also aware Service manual also says to use it.



Some videos and DIY’s people aren’t using neither or at least don’t mention them being used.

I have owned an R6 and have done many changes to drain plug, new washer every time “never torqued just tightened” and never had any kind of slight seeping or leak.

I’m curious if I will find loctite on the cover bolts and Threebond on drain plug that I will have to clean off the bolt when I do the oil for my first time.
If I don’t see any, I may not put it on as it makes leaving less junk to clean off the crews and what not for future changes and risks of over torquing.



QUESTION

Is Loctite on the oil filter cap screws and Ducati Threebond on the Drain plug REALLY needed if cleaned properly, and torqued correctly??

Just curious of majority opinions and if anyone has experience NOT doing either one and never having an issue with any leaks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
just looking at my MTS and 848 factory manuals and they both say to apply Three bond 1215 to the threads on the drain plug. First time i have noticed this!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,338 Posts
Ducati uses its Service Manual to tell their mechanics to use Threebond to prevent oil leaks and to use Loctite to prevent fastener/joint loss due to vibration on their customer's bikes.

Customers who do their own maintenance such as oil changes — against the recommendations of Ducati — are free to follow whatever practice they choose, follow the advice from the internet and ignore the service manual.

Service manuals are designed to promote good maintenance methods, avoid known problems, and assure warranty-related issues are avoided. I see no good reason to second-guess and solicit opinions about the manual.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top