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I have a 2001 996, the winter is over and i changed the antifreeze and oil. When i go to start it, it does nothing, the fuel pump doesn't even kick on when i turn the key...I checked all the fuses and the battery is good...the the lights come on and the horn works. As i turn the key all i hear is a click, i assume from down by the ignition fuse aeea....can anyone helo me troubleshoot? I am guessing maybe my kickstand sensor is bad, because it does nothing. I checked the kickstand sensor fuse with a test light and its getting power to the fuse.
 

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Welcome to the forum!

Well, I'd first start with the battery. I know you said it's ok, but that doesn't mean much to me. Even if it's new, those main high current connectors are always the first suspect. I'd get a multimeter out and start making some measurements on the other side of the connector to verify you have proper voltage. With the ignition on, it needs to be up around 12.5v.

If the battery is OK, the next step is the ignition switch. The kick stand switch only prevents the starter motor from activating, not the fuel pump from priming. When the ignition key is turned on, when the red kill switch is turned on, the fuel pump should prime no matter what. So the first step is to figure out which one of those two switches (the key switch and ignition switch) isn's working.

Flakey relay's are a very common problem on these older Ducati's and the last step would be to measure them out and make sure they're working ok. To do this you will need a manual of some kind to know which pins to apply voltage for testing.

Try those things first and get back to us with what you find. To rule out the battery, use your car's battery with jumper cables. I always do that first! :)
 

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The best way to assess battery health is to take it to an auto supply store and have them do a load test. A load test determines if the battery can deliver its rated current to a resistance similar to that of a starter motor without dropping below a voltage threshold value.

Alternatively, you can simulate this test by first charging the battery (a healthy fully charged battery should measure about 12.6 volts) and then remove the fuse to the fuel pump so that when the engine is cranked it won't start. Measure the voltage across the battery terminals as it cranks. If the voltage drops into the upper-9 volt range, you need a new battery.
 
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