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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

I've got a couple of screws shafts stuck on the underside of the swingarm. They were from the screws holding the plastic brake line shoe to the swingarm that I needed to remove in order to bleed my rear brakes. Unfortunately, they were in such bad shape that the heads just twisted off, leaving the shaft stuck inside. So I'm wondering if anyone has had experience with these screws or if there's any advice one can give to getting them out?

They're pretty flush and so I can't grab them with vice grips. I was going to try drilling through with a 5/64" bit and then using a screw extractor on a t handle tap wrench. It seems like the screw is pretty tough so I'll have to up the RPMs.

Here is a picture of one of the stuck screw shafts
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
FYI, I used a set of left handed drill bits on it and it just wore down the bits! O.O
At this point I might have to get a mechanic or similar shop to get them out with some more sophisticated tools. What a shame =/
 

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Do you have small rotary saw? cut it for crew driver fit, WD40 over and over for an hour, cover those items surround with wet tower..... heat torch, hope this only way to get it out Good luck man
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
just to give an update, i was able to drill the screws out. After removing the rear wheel, I was able to use a small electric screwdriver (Ridgid cordless) and a 5/64" left handed drill bit to drill a pilot hole with the hope of the bit catching the screw and unwinding it out. It didn't grab the screw but I did manage to get a pilot hole drilled -- though make sure to buy carbide bits and not POS "titanium coated" bits. I wore down one of those titanium coated ones without even making a dent into the screw. I then used a manual screw extractor in the electric screwdriver and it pulled right out. Lastly I replaced the shitty ducati screws with harder ones and applied antiseize as a bonus.
 

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A note on using a drill. Just because the box says "high speed drill bits" does not mean pull the trigger on the drill with a vengeance. The optimum speed for drilling metal is almost slow enough to count the revolutions. The metal should be removed in a continuous spiral shaving. If it is coming off in powder or chips you are spinning the bit too fast and are only succeeding in liquefying the cutting edge of the bit. Regardless of the quality or coating of the bit or the composition of the material being drilled, the speed is the most important factor. I have drilled out a sheared screw extractor without destroying a bit, and anyone who has attempted that before knows how incredibly difficult that is. If you have a cordless drill with a transmission selector, always set it to the slowest setting, and it makes it easier to properly module the bit speed with the trigger.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
A note on using a drill. Just because the box says "high speed drill bits" does not mean pull the trigger on the drill with a vengeance. The optimum speed for drilling metal is almost slow enough to count the revolutions. The metal should be removed in a continuous spiral shaving. If it is coming off in powder or chips you are spinning the bit too fast and are only succeeding in liquefying the cutting edge of the bit. Regardless of the quality or coating of the bit or the composition of the material being drilled, the speed is the most important factor. I have drilled out a sheared screw extractor without destroying a bit, and anyone who has attempted that before knows how incredibly difficult that is. If you have a cordless drill with a transmission selector, always set it to the slowest setting, and it makes it easier to properly module the bit speed with the trigger.
yeah that's a good point. going slow definitely worked for me, and id also stress the importance of appropriate bits for the material you're drilling into. The titanium coated bits I originally used didnt do shit in terms of drilling through the shaft of the stuck screw, but a carbide one did, and i was able to drill effectively at a lot slower speed
 
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