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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
A few weeks back I picked up a 1993 900SS. It's in rough shape. Not only mechanically, but cosmetically too.



I've been busy sorting things out, one at a time. The engine oil leaked out like it was being poured through a pasta strainer.



Turned out the chain had derailed at some point in the life of the bike and smashed the alternator cover and the crank case half.



Was somewhat successful in fixing the majority of the damage but will likely end up replacing the cover. For now though, it isn't leaking all over the shop floor.



The rear shock leaked too, I have a replacement from a later SSie. I can confirm after measuring that from center of eye to eye, the OEM Showa measures right at 328mm while the later Sachs measures right at 337 mm. That ought to help out some in the "flickability" department.



As anyone would, I have also gotten new timing belts, though I have not installed them as yet.



I removed the rear end completely last weekend. The loose chain sawed through the pinch bolt and made it impossible to remove. I had to drill the head out to get the pivot pin out so I could remove the swing arm.



There is damage to the swing arm, mostly minor/cosmetic from both the loose running chain as well as the improperly installed Cobra F1s pipes that were on the bike. Some numpty used longer bolts to mount the pipes but failed at taking the swing arm travel into account. Needless to say, there are gouges on the both sides of the swing arm brace.



I removed it so those things could be repaired though now, I have the additional task of removing the pinch bolt too.



Also ordered an adjustable set of forks to replace the leaking non-adjustable forks. They'll likely need a rebuilt also but for the time being, I'll just install them in the frame.



The frame is coming off the engine so I can complete the repairs on the damaged crankcase half. I figure, while I have it out I can do the valves and belts on the work bench instead.



Other than that, I've just been ordering parts from eBay and other places. My goal is a resto-mod. I have almost all the parts for the resto part. Then it's down to the mod part which while significant, isn't anything radical. I have the primary parts for the mod, just not all the body work.



It does have all the original bodywork on it. I pulled it all off and found "Ducati" followed by a part number on all the pieces.



It has all been painted, though it looks like the bodywork was left on the bike when it was both prepped an when the paint was buffed out. I don't know why it was buffed out, it's really shitty paint.



My kid at 10 could have done a better job with a paint brush. He's 20 now and definitely could do a better job. Needless to say, that will change. I'll leave that to last though because it is a big part of the "mod" in resto-mod.



That and since the OEM stuff is all there, even though it is in need of a tremendous amount of restoration, I'm contemplating buying some aftermarket glass for it. Just so I can store the OEM stuff.



On the other hand, this is a 30K mile plus bike. I don't know exactly how many miles, the speedo cable was broken when I got it. It also has a salvage CA title.



Thus, I don't think it really matters a lot what I do to the OEM bodywork. It isn't like I'm going to sell it on.



The salvage title means I'd get little for it, and definitely not what I have to put in to it to get it even close to right.



I figure that since it's a salvage title and high miles, I don't care how many more I put on. It isn't a museum quality bike, nor even a living room quality bike. Not yet anyway.



I'll populate this thread eventually with details and pictures. So far, progress hasn't been rapid, nor smooth. Lots of pics have been taken....and in due time, I'll share them all.....sean
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
This is the slave cylinder that came on the bike when I got it:

Anyone seen one of these before? Anodized red and it has "Hammer" imprinted in the silver center. Just want to know what brand it is. It seems to work just fine and isn't leaking.....sean
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Here is what the bike looked like when I picked it up:

The hole that is visible below the fuse box was for a cigarette lighter socket. Why? I don't know. I can assume it was for a nav device, cell phone or something...but it wasn't even wired up. The smaller hole, lower down on the panel was for a toggle switch. I guess. I found "under glow" LED lights taped into place under the tail section plastic. There wasn't a switch in the hole when I got the bike.




View of the opposite side. Rough doesn't begin to describe how bad off this thing was.......sean
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Here is some of the swing arm damage:



Don't mind the chain or sprocket condition. That is already removed and will be replaced with new parts once I reach the point where that is required. As it is presently torn down, those can wait.



This is what the pinch bolt looked like AFTER I cleaned all the slag off of the opening for the Allen wrench.



Here is the remnant of the bolt head:

The flat end is the end that was against the swing arm. The jagged angled end is what I had to work with.
 

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The pinch t is a prick at th the best of times.

A 14t front will damage the head as soon as the chain gets some slop.

I spent an hour repairing mine with a points file till I could hammer/ persuade the hex into the head .
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'll have a look and visually inspect the area. You don't think I need to go as far as magnaflux do you?



This thing was probably a cherry once upon a time. It has an aluminum swing arm and a 5.5" rear wheel. As far as I can tell, it's all factory original.



The shock that I removed is also consistent with the factory original. Leaked like it was too.



Gratuitous pic of the wheel:

This is after a good clean with mineral spirits followed by wash with some good degreaser. The paint seems original...but was painted over at some point with some cheap plastic cote or something. It works off if scrubbed long and hard enough.



The Cagiva/Ducati elephant is prominent which is what gives me the idea that it might be original....sean
 

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No a careful eye around the lower shock bolt and the welds below that should show any damage.

Mine is much newer version, ssie, but the swing arms are similar .. not the same but similar.

I didn’t think the alloy came till later... cannot back it up though
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Clutch slave ID

Does anyone recognize this clutch slave?



Just trying to ID it. I don't know for certain but the logo looks like maybe Accosato? Did they make a slave cylinder called a Hammer?...sean
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Well, the frame is off the engine now. Front end removed and all. Found a broken front sub-frame so that will get a gusset and welded up.







Also found the upper lug for the sub-frame mount had been poorly aligned and then poorly welded. That'll be addressed soon.



Then I found the rear sub-frame had a similar thing going on with a lug for the tail light mount. Misaligned, poorly welded and then threaded with the wrong thread size so there are two different bolts to hold the tail light in place. Piss poor.



Carbs came off this week...and what a mess they are. Had some green algae growing in the float bowls as well as a gorilla'd main jet and emulsion tube housing.



I hesitate to call it all a nightmare because I knew going in this wasn't going to be an easy resto-mod project.



To me, anyone who would just abuse a Ducati like this one has been clearly shouldn't own one. Ever.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
In my last post I identified the starter jet as the main jet, so let me get that out of the way first.



I've since managed to clean up the front sub-frame and gusset and weld the break. I put some matte black on it to keep it from rusting but the original finish was bronze. l kinda like the black though, so I may keep it.



I cut off the misaligned, poorly welded and poorly threaded lug from the rear sub-frame. Also got some metal to fabricate a new lug for both the rear sub-frame and the steering head.



Along with that, I decided on a frame color and bought the paint to do that once all the welding repairs are completed. More later....with pics..........sean
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Well....there was alot more to that swing arm than I realized initially.



I'd considered that the damage to the swing arm from the exhaust bolts hitting to be the worst of it.


I happened to notice some scuffing further down the swing arm that seemed to have come from the OEM pipes as there was no opposing scuffing on the F1s pipes that came with it.



It seemed to me that the swing arm had flexed under cornering loads to make contact but I had no reference for this ever being an issue.



Today, I decided to get the thing cleaned up so I could get the broken off bolt out of the pinch joint. I put the swing arm in a steam cleaner.



My old shop has an enclosed steam clean cabinet that has a turn table with jet nozzles to spray 200 degree soapy water on any part placed on the turn table.



I did this and when the swing arm came out, I found this:





That explains alot really. I can now comprehend why there was scuffing from the OEM pipes.

Luckily, a colleague of mine from the old shop is a former welding instructor. Certified and everything.



He offered to TIG weld the crack for me. He detailed his intentions for making the repair, including a media blast of the entire thing. I said yes.


He even offered to weld up the big dings from the exhaust bolt damage in the deal. I'm paying a "friends and family" discounted price so hopefully this doesn't turn out to be horrendously expensive. Like buying a new swing arm expensive......sean
 

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Your mate might be good or even great but look up and pm Eltwin .

He repaired my swing arm and a simple weld repair won’t cut it from memory.. something about heat treating after or sumting.. also a good quality gouge out and clean up.

Afterwards the weld is noticeable. With some more work and knowledge he got mine powdercoated close to the original look.. well closer than it would have been.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Any professional welder worth his salt knows to pre-heat and post heat a job. Relieves stresses on the metals involved. Aluminum in particular cools rapidly and can crack from rapid shrinkage during cooling.



A guy I worked with a couple of decades ago taught me a lot about welding. He welded on nuclear submarines at Mare Island Naval Station before we worked together.



If I had the machine to do it, I'd do so myself. I do not, which is why I went to the guy I went to. He's all set up for this job and can do it in a short period of time.



We already discussed "V"grinding back the crack and getting it perfectly clean. He's also going to media blast it for me....and maybe, if I catch him in time, weld on some bungs for lift spools. ...sean
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I did manage to catch him in time. I asked him to weld on a piece of stock 1/2" in diameter or square. Either will work. I'll just drill and tap later.



In other areas, I got new steering head bearings. THAT was a complete farce. I went to my local bearing supplier and brought the bearings with me to make sure we got a good number or at least a good measurement to order them.



After a half day of research, I get a call from the bearing supplier saying that p/n 639174 was no longer available. I could get the roller bearing cone p/n 639172 but not the bearing cup.



I told the counter person that was ludicrous. Why would SKF still make a cone but not the cup to put it in? I was assured they had contacted SKF US office and that part number was no longer available.



I asked about a replacement part number and was then told there was none. I countered that I could find this bearing on the internet all day. To which I received the response that I should do so. So, no more business from me.



I did some research and in about 3 minutes found there was a replacement part number from SKF as well as *** p/n 509592.



I figured that was all well and good but if I still couldn't get it easily then I needed to do more research. I did and found that the bearing measurement given was 26mm bore. However, when I measured mine with a digital vernier caliper I got something closer to just less than 25.5mm.



That gave me the idea that the bearing might be fractional rather than metric. So, I went to Timken Bearing and on their website they list bearings by size. I found the steering head bearing pretty easily but then noticed that there was a "application" tab too.



When I clicked the application tab, I discovered that the bearing was an OEM rear wheel bearing on a 1954-1962 Fiat 500. THAT makes searching a great deal easier. Now you can data mine all the major auto parts places for a bearing from the manufacturer of your choice using that information.



I did so, and found that Rock Auto had them from National Bearing. That's a Federal Mogul company if you are unfamiliar. I've used their stuff for decades so quality is a known quantity with me.



I got them delivered to my door for a whopping $32. Both the upper and lower sets. All that got me thinking. I need wheel bearings too. I started searching and found that I can get both the front wheel bearings as well as the cush drive hub bearings from Amazon. Yes, Amazon.



The rear wheel bearings are a bit special apparently as they are extra wide. They're still a single row, double sealed angular ball bearing but are about 4mm wider than the standard bearing.



I found a good Timken number so I'll try my local automotive parts place to see if they can get it. Turns out, the Timken bearing is superior to the SKF....the SKF bearing is only rated at 12K rpm while the Timken is rated to 20K.



Also, the Timken bearing uses a high quality grease inside the seals. The SKF from what research I did, uses lithium grease.



Beyond the research and buying parts, I haven't done much else. Bought a new to me front wheel from a later 900 SSie. Bearings are a straight swap as they both use the same OD bearing. The spacer and speedo drive are a tad more problematic though.



The early wheel has a heavy steel spacer while the newer wheel has an aluminum spacer that is both bigger in diameter as well as slightly longer. Still working on a solution to that one. Already solved the speedo drive though.



Also bought a nice straight OEM handle bar for the left side. It will replace the previously bent one (bent between the collar and the bar itself) so now, realistically, all that is left is to reassemble the front end. I plan on painting the wheel though so I'll stop short of full reassembly.



Also, considering doing the GSXR fork mod while I have the forks out....and maybe rebuilding them with SKF super slick seals too. Anyone done both and have some comments or advice? Thanks for reading.....sean
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
What are the mods to the Forks that you talk about(GSXR mods)? Are there any articles about this you can point me towards.
I'll have to have a look around this forum and the "other" Ducati forum. There is a lengthy article about the GSXR mod.



Essentially, you gut the stock forks save for the springs. Any early-mid 2000s model GSXR fork will work. They're literally available right now on eBay for not a lot of money.



You don't even need a straight set, so long as they're not completely sheared off or pretzel shaped. If you look long enough, you'll find a set of guts that were removed for a swap to a set of Öhlins or other performance internals.



The diameter of my 2004 GSXR 600 fork tube is exactly the same as that of my 1993 900 Super Sport fork tube. So for certain, a 2004-05 fork will work. Which is awesome as they are probably the best functioning GSXR forks up to that time.



Basically you remove the cap, and all the internals. Cut off a couple of retaining "nubs" and remove the GSXR spring. Swap the entire thing into the 900 SS fork tube with the 900 SS spring, add your fork oil and cap with the GSXR fork cap. Now you have compression and rebound adjustments that work really well compared to what you started with.



As the forks will already be that far apart for a seal replacement anyway, it just makes sense to go ahead and do it if you are planning on it. I'll ad a link once I find the thread about it.....sean....here you go:
https://www.ducati.ms/forums/57-supersport/343186-sp-showa-fork-conversion-suzuki-internals.html
 

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Thanks for that NorCal!
I'll start looking to see what bits I can buy/find for that mod.
I did look at "Babbits" to see what the gsxr cartridges list for new and they are around $330us each so a second hand set is what's needed!
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
Thanks for that NorCal!
I'll start looking to see what bits I can buy/find for that mod.
I did look at "Babbits" to see what the gsxr cartridges list for new and they are around $330us each so a second hand set is what's needed!
I've seen a slightly bent set of 2005 GSXR 750 forks on eBay for $70. That's the kind of deal that makes the GSXR mod an inexpensive suspension upgrade.

A quick 3 minute eBay trawl produced this: https://www.ebay.com/itm/2006-SUZUK...ash=item5d8228e9ca:g:vMAAAOSw5oxbv5vF&vxp=mtr
$100 for the set, 2006 GSXR750. You can use the 06 GSXR...it isn't much different to the 2004-05 fork. The one you don't want is the BPF fork as it isn't going to swap over....I mean, unless you want to swap the entire fork, wheel, fender, brakes...

I paid about $330 for the "new to me" fully adjustable, period correct Showa forks for my project 900 SS. Another $150 or so in parts, for new seals and fluid plus the GSXR mod is a small investment for a big return....sean
 
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