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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Spent some time in the garage over the last week. Installed new sprocket carrier bearings after cleaning up the filth. It clung to the carrier with a great deal of determination, requiring about an hour of scrubbing with mineral spirits and a tooth brush.



Finally finished up all the grinder work on the frame. Welds ground back that needed repair, metal removed that needed replacement, new parts fabbed up and ready to weld on. Once all that is done, it's time for paint!!


On that subject, I picked out the color for this project and bought a quart of House of Kolor for the job. That's sitting here waiting for me to reach that phase of this project.



Wheel bearings are all here too, so that job is just over the horizon. I'm going to paint the wheels too and maybe polish the lip on them. I like that look. Not 100% sure on the color yet though I'm down to gold or bronze.



Finally, there's the tank. Before I start on that, let me describe the sight that greeted me when got the bike.



The tank, and indeed the entire bike was repainted. Poorly I might add. The tank though was particularly heinous. The "painter" and that is in quotes for a reason, painted over both the weather gasket and fill cap carrier.

When I finally managed to remove the fill cap carrier, which only occurred with much effort and lots of cursing, the paint cracked and popped...chips flying everywhere until the o-ring finally yielded.




The weather seal was split so obviously will need to be replaced. The o-ring I would replace just because I don't know how long it has been installed. Same for the filter and fuel pump.




Luckily, Ducati used the same seals for the later model SSie bikes and are still available via Ducati Omaha or any other online Ducati OEM parts dealers. The ones for the 2001 Super Sport 900 are the same part number if anyone is also in need.

Then the super thick paint had to be removed...took about half an hour with a stainless steel bristle brush and scraper to get it all off.



Lastly, there are the swing arm bearings. The damn things refuse to leave their bore. I completely destroyed one already and am still no closer to removing either it, nor the other three. Looks as though I'll be doing some delicate work with my dremmel in the near future.



I have all new seals and bearings so destroying the old ones is not a big deal...just far messier than the way I typically do things. More later.......sean
 

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I’d think about leaving the tank at wire brushed.. spend another 2 hours on it then
Clear over the top.

Ok I probably couldn’t be arsed...
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Last weekend I removed the old fuel pump and fuel filter. After checking the web for images of a new filter, I'm sure the installed one was well past it.



There were some failed parts on the pump as well so I'm glad I decided to address it early on in this resto-mod.



The tank....well...lets just say, it sucks. In a way anyway. Inside is extremely clean. No real rust...certainly no heavy flakey rust. Just a single spot on the roof of the tank that is discolored. I'm still going to do the POR15 treatment just for peace of mind.



The exterior is what sucks. As I was removing the fuel pump and filter as an assembly, my sleeve caught on a jagged piece of paint and snapped it off.



When I looked down at the tank, a nickel sized flake of paint had popped off. I got curious. I grabbed a hook scribe and prodded the paint around the opening. To my surprise, more and more of it just popped off.



I ended up doing that to the entire tank and getting all the nasty (and wrong shade of red) paint off save for the part were the seat meets the tank. THAT part must have cured better than the rest.



There is a darker red coating between the original red paint and the primer that was applied below the red seen in the previous pics. I don't know what to make of it, but have decided it must be some sort of adhesion promoter. It seemed gooey on much of the tank, and only required some lacquer thinner to remove.



On other parts, it is hardened even more so than the paint that flaked off of it. Even after scraping it with a putty knife and a gasket scraper it is still stubbornly adhered to the knee cut outs and of course, the area where the seat meets the tank.



The pic below is before the detailed scraping work but after a wipe down of lacquer thinner:


The pic below is a close up of the area above where the clamp is, in the recess of the tank vent. The darker red to the left is the original red, while the lighter red to the right is the respray red. The darker, almost cherry red seen in flecks is the "adhesion promoter" I wrote about.




In other news, I received word today that my swing arm is now repaired. I haven't seen it yet, but my welder is having surgery next week...looks like it won't be until after Thanksgiving before I see it. It can wait...it isn't like this thing is going to be ready to be put back together any time soon........more later.......sean
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Are you getting it powder coated or just put up with the discolouration around the welds?
huh?



I'm assuming you mean the frame...but you know what you get when you assume.



Currently, due to limited space in my garage I have the tank sitting on the frame when I'm not working on it.



The frame is in the process of having some of the more damaged or mismechanic'd bits welded up.



Therefore some of the paint has been stripped back. It will get painted matte gold in the near future. Once the welding is done.



The tank will eventually get painted, once all the ugly has been worked out of it and all the internal stuff is taken care of.



Priority now is to get the frame completed so it has a good long while for the paint to cure.



After that is get the swing arm bearings out of the engine. They have so far proven to be reluctant to leave their bores.



Once the bearings have been replaced, valves and belts, then spark plugs. Then some amount of reassembly may begin.



The front end is sitting there waiting for install. The swing arm repairs are complete, I just have to pick it up. Wheels are being stripped for paint.



Once the wheels are painted, they too will wait a good long while for the paint to cure before I install the bearings and mount tires.....unless my work circumstances change, in which case there might be a set of Marvic Magnesium reproductions in the cards.



That is a huge MAYBE though as I don't know whether I'll get hired for the promotion position. That's another story for another section of the forum though.........sean
 

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No the swing arm. Where the weld repair on the alloy swing arm has been done will likely be quite noticeable.

I was looking for the photos of my arm after powder coating. Still not as nice as the raw alloy look
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
No the swing arm. Where the weld repair on the alloy swing arm has been done will likely be quite noticeable.

I was looking for the photos of my arm after powder coating. Still not as nice as the raw alloy look

Mine was painted. I assume that was factory applied. It 'looked' polished but was in fact painted.



As for the welds, I haven't seen it yet. I know my welding buddy bead blasted it prior to welding to get all the paint off.



He mentioned bead blasting it after to get rid of any scorching or discoloration of the aluminum.



I'll figure it out once I see it. I'd like to just polish it and have the finish you mention. I won't be able to make a decision until I see it though.



If it looks more rough than when I gave it to him, I'll take him up on a bead blast and then I'll decide whether to paint again or go with a powder coat.....sean
 

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Inspired by your progress and trying not to feel lame for not getting the repairs done on my 93 after a crash in July. I'm planning to repair the rhs fairing over the winter. I'm located in NorCal too (Martinez) - I'll keep in touch with info about paint and decal resources.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Inspired by your progress and trying not to feel lame for not getting the repairs done on my 93 after a crash in July. I'm planning to repair the rhs fairing over the winter. I'm located in NorCal too (Martinez) - I'll keep in touch with info about paint and decal resources.
Oh Sweet!! I'm just over the bridge from you in Fairfield. I was planning on using a company in the UK. I can't remember the name but they sell on eBay quite alot. They have the replica decal set complete for about $90. Pretty sure Tapeworks has them too but as I remember they were around $150 or so.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 · (Edited)
I got the swing arm back this past weekend. My welder did a fantastic job.



We discussed the repairs to be made as well as what method to use (pulse wave TIG) and adding some lugs or bungs for lift spools.



All that was done.



Here's the crack at the pivot before the weld:


And after:


Also, here is a pic of the damage to the left side from the improperly mounted exhaust bolts:


And after the repair:


I had similar damage to the right hand side of the swingarm and had that welded up too. My welder had to stop though because of a prior scheduled doctors visit.



I picked up the swingarm with the repair bead still raw and not dressed as the above repair was. I didn't get a shot of before, or before I dressed the weld and polished it but here it is polished:



More later, when I finish polishing the swing arm....and the front wheel lip. Both are sitting in my garage at about 2/3 complete.........sean
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Hey nice work on the polishing.. great option. Just hard yakka..

Thank you....and yeah, hard work there. Hours worth even with a polisher, sizle pads and compound....sean
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Update

Lots has gone on since I got the swing arm back from my welder. I've been polishing for a long time now and am still not done.



I've decided that to complete the visible areas and just paint the rest. I'm using Duplicolor wheel paint so it should be good for protection from road debris, weather and fluids.





I cleaned up the fuel filler cap carrier and installed a keyless quick removal billet cap from eBay seller BoBMoto:






I've removed the awful paint on the tank and sanded it back:



There is a small dent in the tank midway between the filler hole and the vent bulge. I welded a nail to it and pulled the dent with vice grips:



Ground the welds flush and then skim filled what was left with some lightweight body filler:









All the welding repairs to the frame are now complete. Just have to sand it and prep it for paint.



Also managed to get the right side outer swing arm bearing out of the engine just yesterday. Ended up welding a nut to what remained of the outer race and used a puller bridge and a bolt to draw the old race out of the engine.






Three more to go. Hope they aren't all as stubborn as that one.



Finally, I got started on the slab side fairings. I took the right side one down from the rafters in my garage and began to prod the crap paint with a hook scribe like I did on the tank.



To my expectation, the paint began to chip off in large sections. Some as long as 4" and 2" wide. The image below is of a couple of those chips. The golf ball is included for scale.




The end result was a bit of moto-archaeology. I found this residing under all that crappy paint:



Shame it'll end up being removed. The entire side piece is in need of a great deal of repair. There are numerous cracks in the fiberglass.



Some were previously "repaired" by a numpty with no knowledge of fiberglass repair techniques.



I pried off about a half pound of chopped strand fiberglass that was applied with a combination of resin and what appears to be RTV silicone. *sigh*


I still have another half pound of kitty hair type filler to grind out of the back side of the fairing before I can even get down to stop drilling cracks and grinding reliefs for proper repairs.



I'm going to use marine grade epoxy instead of regular cheapo resin to re-repair all that garbage. More later when I make some progress.....sean
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
I got the remaining bearings and seals out of the swingarm pivot bore.



I have detailed that process in another thread so I'll not elaborate on it more here.



It is my hope that someone else benefits from the information in that thread. May they not have to attempt other methods before finding my thread on the subject.



Now that I have the swing arm bearings out, I can move on to cleaning the engine up, checking the valves and replacing the belts.



While I'm at it, I am considering replacing the plastic belt covers with something like carbon fiber ones. Also, will likely change out the bolts in the covers to aluminum ones.



Then there is the alternator cover. I have to address the damage to it also. Just not sure what I want to do there.



I have some special rod for use on things like the alternator cover. I may go that route or maybe just use some JB weld on the inside to stop oil leaking out of the cracks. Then I'll replace all the cover bolts with stainless steel bolts.



After that, it's pretty much ready to have the frame reinstalled on it. Well....after I paint the frame anyway. Getting there.....but now that I managed to get those swingarm bearings out, it is like reaching a milestone. At least, it feels that way.........sean
 

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while I have never used JB weld and have only a google search to assist me..

Can you get a product called 'DEVCON" over there?

This is the stuff I would be using. it's a 2 part Aluminium putty that sets rock hard.

I have use it in (now) old borg warner 40 trans pumps when the early ones had incorrect fluid channels. We devcon'd up the channel and re-drilled to correct place then filed a new channel to suit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
while I have never used JB weld and have only a google search to assist me..

Can you get a product called 'DEVCON" over there?

This is the stuff I would be using. it's a 2 part Aluminium putty that sets rock hard.

I have use it in (now) old borg warner 40 trans pumps when the early ones had incorrect fluid channels. We devcon'd up the channel and re-drilled to correct place then filed a new channel to suit.

We get DEVCON here. It's more of a "trade" product but I can get my hands on it. The JB Weld is just a cheaper, consumer version of it.



It does work for things like sealing up a hole or crack to prevent fluid loss. It isn't up to structural stuff though. I've used it professionally for stuff like that.


I've used DEVCON professionally too. Same sort of scenario as yours. though we didn't have to make new channels, just repair a bolt hole and a fix a channel or three (some numpty left a bolt out and then bolted a cover down on it, smashing the channels below it).



None of it was load bearing which is where I think you'd be better off welding.



I'll have a look when I take off my alternator cover again and get a good look at the cracks I found previously.


As I remember they were small and not particularly wide which is why I think a properly prepared surface and a bit of JB Weld could be just the thing to fix it.



I already have JB Weld....it will take me a few days to get some DEVCON metal repair. That's really the reason I'm considering it.



Like I wrote previously, I have some special rod for just this sort of repair.....but as it isn't structural I don't feel like it is warranted. ....sean
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
Really enjoying reading this thread. Sounds like a really fun project!
Fun? I dunno about that. At first it was, until I started finding all manner of damage and poorly executed misrepairs. Now it just feels like work.



I do the same sort of thing all day, every day as a mobile heavy equipment mechanic. I hesitate to use the word "technician" that seem to be in vogue these days. To me that implies the use of computers in the job and I definitely don't do alot of that.



It's heavy equipment, so much of what is done is visual diagnostics or just plain using brute force to make metal do your bidding. Not a whole lot of computer use there.



This project has been maddening at times and deeply satisfying at others. Fun? Not so much....too much like my daily job for that.. The fun comes when I get it rolling down the road again.....sean
 
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