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I know the bike itself is a Ducati cadet 100 but i'm not to sure about what year it might be i figure around 75-76 cause i was told it was somewhere from that time and it only has 400k...can anyone help i can't find any info on this bike :ahhh:
 

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A very rare bike indeed you have there NewbieDucati.

The Cadet, as far as I can gather, is a 98cc 2 stroke 3 speed with the gear change in the left hand grip. I think it evolved from the 47.6cc 'Brio' 2 stroke which produced 0.98 bhp @ 4,600 rpm and the 'Brisk' scooter. The 'Brio' was introduced in 1963. These bikes were a failed attemp into the scooter market and although had moderate sales succes in Italy they never sold abroad into the British or US markets.

In the persistance they doubled the capcity to 98cc in 1965 and that motor was put into the Brio (scooter) and the Cadet (roadster) with a reported 6 bhp @ 5,200 rpm. So this bike here is more than likely a 1965 model. Because of slow sales they were still available up until 1968.

They never sold and just backed up in the factory. A rival British importer to a Mr Vic Camp, Bill Hannah apparently imported hundreds into Britian where they never sold very well either.


Source: 'Ducati Motorcyles' Alan Cathcart (1983) Osprey Publishing Limited.

Also see http://www.ducatispot.com/forums/showthread.php?t=6880&highlight=shroud
 

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Cadet

A very rare bike indeed you have there NewbieDucati.

The Cadet, as far as I can gather, is a 98cc 2 stroke 3 speed with the gear change in the left hand grip. I think it evolved from the 47.6cc 'Brio' 2 stroke which produced 0.98 bhp @ 4,600 rpm and the 'Brisk' scooter. The 'Brio' was introduced in 1963. These bikes were a failed attemp into the scooter market and although had moderate sales succes in Italy they never sold abroad into the British or US markets.

In the persistance they doubled the capcity to 98cc in 1965 and that motor was put into the Brio (scooter) and the Cadet (roadster) with a reported 6 bhp @ 5,200 rpm. So this bike here is more than likely a 1965 model. Because of slow sales they were still available up until 1968.

They never sold and just backed up in the factory. A rival British importer to a Mr Vic Camp, Bill Hannah apparently imported hundreds into Britian where they never sold very well either.


Source: 'Ducati Motorcyles' Alan Cathcart (1983) Osprey Publishing Limited.

Also see http://www.ducatispot.com/forums/showthread.php?t=6880&highlight=shroud
brett,

Good work!

Newbie, brett is spot on; your bike is indeed a relatively rare, (and highly collectable!) two-stroke Cadet. (Btw, Ducati also offered a 4-stroke Cadet 125 in 1967 and 1968.)

Allow me to add a few more details, (gleaned from Ian Falloon's, Standard Catalogue of Ducati Motorcyles):

Per Mr. Falloon, the Cadet was first released in 1964 as the Cadet 90, (actual displacement was 86.7cc, power output was 6hp.) The following year, (1965), bore was increased slightly from 49 to 51mm, increasing displacement to 94cc, (power output remained unchanged at 6hp), and the Cadet 100 was borne.

The initial model ran for two years, (1965/6). A slightly modified Cadet was offered from 1967 through 1969. Beginning with model year 1967, the major modifications were to the engine: displacement was increased again, (to 97.6cc), with the new engine now producing 7.2hp.

Additionally, in 1967 the fan-cooled head was abandoned, (although, per Ian Falloon, "fan- cooled versions were sold in the US through 1967"). The fan was an interesting idea, but ultimately didn't work. As you can see in the pics, a fan powered directly off the crankshaft sucked air in at the right side of the crankcase and blew the air up and around the head, which was shrouded in a metal case designed to direct the cooling air around the head. Just like a turbo or supercharger, the faster the engine spinned, the faster the cooling fan spinned. This was basically, "forced air," cooling, or, (put another way), "turbo-cooled." While ingenious, the design overlooked the obvious: namely, (assuming the bike is moving), an unshrouded head would receive more cooling air just by movement than the shrouded head could receive from the fan. The fan-cooled head design is only superior when the bike is stationary. Most people spend the majority of their riding time riding, but maybe Ducati was already designing for Starbucks poser types?!

For 1967, Ducati also abandoned the handlebar shift and outfitted the Cadet 100 with a rocking pedal foot change gear selector on the right side. The presence of the fan-cooled head and the right side rocking pedal foot change gear selector, (both clearly visible in your pics), means your Cadet 100 is a 1967 US model, outfitted with pedal shift, but still using the older fan-cooled head.

Interestingly enough, the luggage rack, (which was not standard equipment on the Cadet), appears to be from a Mountaineer. The Mountaineer was a motorcycle quite similar to the Cadet, offered by Ducati during the same period. Both bikes shared many components, including tank, headlight, and engine, the most noticable difference between the two models being the luggage rack, larger rear sprocket, and mid-swept scrambler exhaust on the Mountaineer as compared to no luggage rack, smaller rear sprocket, and a low-swept road exhaust on the Cadet.

Ducati has a long history of recycling whatever left-over parts they have laying around in the parts bin, so it's not surprising that your Cadet is equipped with a Mountaineer luggage rack. Either that, or the luggage rack is aftermarket. If it's a Mountaineer luggage rack that Ducati saw fit to mount on a Cadet, then it should be left on; if on the other hand, the luggage rack is a non-Ducati aftermarket accessory, the bike will, (arguably), be worth more with the luggage rack removed.

That's quite a little bike you have there!

Elton
 

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Discussion Starter #7
thanks alot guys..ya im almost 100% that the bike came with the luggage rack on it still...what would u figure a bike like that would go for price wise is what im curious about really cause i haven't as of yet found a specific price for it?
 

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ya something like that...its mine but im just curious on how much something like that would go for and every where i look im gettin mixed information, and not gettin a solid answer..though i have heard to try and find a appraiser to appraise it...but i have no idea where to find a vintage motorcylce appraiser... and as well i have heard something along the lines of 4500 but other people say thats too much??? im lost!
 

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wow newbie..that little girl is a pearl..

dont know where youre from or if you get along with your dealership people..or if theres one nearby to you...
but i would either
see if a dealership could get an email out on your behalf to the ducati factory (with pics), and ask for some advice that way...
or
email ducati.com yourself with pics and see what kind of response or leads you can get thru them...
or like you say, seek someone out who deals in valuation
insurance co. may be able to help????..may be able to give you a name or lead to someone ..

dunno....just some thoughts..
good luck with your search
:)

its a beautiful little treasure!!
 

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'67 'Cadet 100 value

what would u figure a bike like that would go for?
Newbie,

I'm by no means an expert in the value of older Ducatis, but I do follow their sales on ebay, and have friends who buy, collect and sell vintage Ducatis, so I'll hazard a guesstimate for you:

First off, I'm guessing that since you came on www.ducatispot.com asking for help figuring out what year your Cadet is, you don't have a title. If at all possible, (and unless you stole the bike, it is possible), you need to get a title for the bike. The absence of a title decreases the resale value of your Cadet. Bike collectors are looking for a clear title with the bike. No title means less people will be interested in buying your bike, and those that are interested will not pay as much as if the bike came with a clear title. So go to your local MV office and find out how to get a title.

Your bike has many of the things that collectors of vintage Ducatis covet. Low milage, original tank, (that's huge!, many old Ducatis have replacement fiberglass tanks, or at the very least, repainted tanks), original seat, (also a big deal, most of these old Ducs long ago lost their original seats, and collectors look for original seats when shopping), and original paint, (which hopefully can be polished/shined/buffed up to presentable quality without having to repaint the bike. A vintage Ducati with original paint in presentable quality is worth much more than a repainted one with perfect paint.)

That's the good news. The bad news is that your old Cadet is filthy and in desperate need of a serious detail job. The paint needs to be cleaned and waxed; the chrome and engine cases are pitted and in need of attention. Just a few hours of elbow grease would improve the bike's appearance significantly and this in turn would enhance its value significantly.

Assuming you sell the bike with a clear title, I'm guessing your bike would sell, "as is," on ebay for somewhere between 3 to 4 thousand dollars. Spend a few hours detailing the bike, clean it up, make it shine, and take some nice pics of it, and you'd probably get 4 to 5 thousand dollars for it. Completely restored back to showroom/concourse condition, I'm guessing the bike is worth 8 to 10 thousand dollars.

Again, I'm not an expert; those numbers are just my opinion. Ultimately, part of the equation has to do with where you're located and the luck of the draw. The bigger a market you're in, the more potential buyers you'll have, and the more likely it is you'll find a buyer who just has to have your Cadet.

Speaking of which, where are you located?

Good luck with the sale.

Elton
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Canada is where i'm from! and title im not sure what you mean by that but all I can say is i defiantly didn't steal it hahah.. my grandpa was a big fan of ducati's and he had it when i was just a wee lad..and when he passed away he left it to me, the only thing is i'm moving and can't bring it along. And i would love to see it back to its original beauty so thats why im looking for a collector to purchase it.
 

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Title

"Title," im not sure what you mean by that.
Newbie,

All new Motor Vehicles leave the manufacturer with an MSO, (Manufacturer's Statement of Origin). When the vehicle is sold by a licensed dealer, the MSO is converted by the local Motor Vehicle Agency into a Title. If the buyer lives in the same state as the dealer, this task is typically done by the dealer's title clerk; if on the other hand, the buyer lives in a different state, the buyer is given the MSO and he/she then takes the MSO to a local Motor Vehicle Agency in his/her state, who in turn generate a title for the vehicle. Either way, the first time a new vehicle is registered, a title is generated.

The title is a physical piece of paper that describes the vehicle itself, (Brand, model, color, and VIN number), and the owner by name and address. Most states also put some sort of seal or watermark on the title to guarantee authenticity and to reduce the risk of counterfiet and/or forged titles. If the owner financed the vehicle, (or has used the vehicle as collateral against some other loan, debt, or obligation), the lien holder's name also appears on the title. This is called a, "lien," or alternately, an, "encumberance." A title with no lien on it is considered, "clean," or, "unencumbered."

If the motor vehicle is sold with an outstanding lien or encumberance on the title, the lien must be satisfied before a new title can be generated. Because of this, buyers typically won't buy a used vehicle unless/until the title is clean.

Every time a motor vehicle is sold, traded, exchanged, or gifted to a new owner, a new title is generated indicating the new owner's name and address. Most states also put an alphabetical prefix before the VIN number, (or somewhere else on the title), indicating how many times the title has changed hands. (For example, an "A" title indicates a first owner, a "B" title indicates a second owner, etc...) This new title is generated at the same time that a buyer goes to register the vehicle. Some owners never register their vehicle, (dedicated track bikes or concourse bikes, for example, neither or which need license plates and are therefore never registered). When this happens, a continuous chain of titles is broken, and a motor vehicle can appear in the market place without a title. This makes it more complicated, (but not impossible!), for a subsequent buyer to get a title for the vehicle.

If the Cadet was left to you by your grandfather after he passed, then you'll be able to get a title for it. It may be complicated, but it can be done. And if you want to get what the bike is worth, you really need to do this. Go to your local Motor Vehicle Agency and inquire. They'll tell you what you need to do.

Elton
 

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Not sure where in Canada you're from but if it's Ontario it's dead easy. Just take the Vin to the local MTO and at worst you may have to get a sworn statement that it's not stolen if there's no information available on it.

I'd had a few vehicles that I yanked from some farmers field, fixed up for the road and just paid the ten bucks for a new vehicle ownership. Elton is exactly right about the title, when I got my first Ducati I had to pretty much order it and when it came it only had the MSO and I had to do the leg work to get a ownership myself. I wish I hadn't had to give that up to the MTO, it was on a beautiful piece of parchment like paper from Ducati.

When you register it in Ontario for it to change hands you have to pay a thirty some dollar fee for a "lein package" and depending on the transaction the black book value of the taxes. Shouldn't apply to you since you basicly inherited it. No big deal either way.

If I were you I'd just go to your MTO or DMV and tell them your story, should be able to fix you up in minutes.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks guys you were a big help now I just need to find a buyer and get all that other stuff done, and i should be on my way (hopefully).
 

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I know the bike itself is a Ducati cadet 100 but i'm not to sure about what year it might be i figure around 75-76 cause i was told it was somewhere from that time and it only has 400k...can anyone help i can't find any info on this bike :ahhh:
Hello All,

Just spotted this thread.

I had a Ducati 100 (a G registration 2-stroke, so 1969 and I may remember the Reg. No. in good time) as my first road-bike which I passed my test on in Southport, Lancashire, U.K. in 1971/2.

I bought the bike from a friend of my Dad's (Bill Smith, PBUH) and Dad's Ducati Enthusiast friend, Bert Halliwell (PBUH) and who had a Ducati 200 Elite which he and Daisy used to ride over to the IoM TT every year, from who I later bought a Ducati Daytona (250cc - CDJ 144B) as a frame and three boxes of parts, which I then rebuilt in the Kitchen at Home (my Mum was not too impressed, until she saw the completed bike!) and then rode the Daytona for several years.

Coincidentally, as an Apprentice Engineer I found out in around 1973 that one of my work-colleagues had been the original owner of the bike in 1964 and had a photograph of the bike as-new (it's a very small world!)!

My being of 25% Manx origin (Dad was 50% Manx), we used to go to the IoM TT on a regular basis and I have had the Ducati Daytona and my Dad's Yamaha YDS5E (1969) around the TT Course in pretty quick-time (though the Creg was a bit hairy at high-speed).

The Ducati 100 was a fan-assisted single-cylinder 2-stroke (sort of a Vespa engine in a Motorbike frame!) and I believe was part of a consignment bound for the USA on a ship that foundered/sunk en-route and with a number of Ducati 100's being acquired by Bill Hannah, a Motorcycle Dealer based at Great George Street in Liverpool.

I loved the Ducati 100, though it was not quite the most powerful bike for its capacity.

I (regretfully) sold the bike around 1972/3 to the Girlfriend of another rider, and as her first bike, as I had then moved on to the much more powerful and faster Ducati 250cc Daytona.

I am sure/hopeful that both Ducati's are still around and are probably worth a fortune today.

In around 1998/99, I did contact the Ducati Museum, as I could not find any mention of the Ducati 100 listed as being a part of the Ducati heritage, and I was surprised that Ducati had somehow forgotten the existence of the Ducati 100 Cadet 2-stroke.

Hope this helps?

Kind regards,

Steve.
 
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