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You've got way too much lean angle going on there. Word of advice, butt crack on the edge of the seat is about how far you should ever be ON the seat going into a corner. Get your head out from under that bubble as well. Your contact patch was very limited on those DOT tires to begin with, looks to me like you rolled off the edge of the tire as you applied throttle. :(

Ohh well, I guess you now have an official full-time tracker! heh ;)
 

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Interesting call on rolling off the tire, I hadn't considered that. I'd assumed it was some combination of 1) too aggressive on the throttle, and 2) lightening the load on the rear tire due to boot / pegs dragging and "levering" the rear end just enough.
Most DOT tires have a much harder sidewall then slicks do. So unless you're running warmers AND very low pressures (which expands the contact patch), you have a high potential of having so little contact patch, the moment you open the throttle, the added lean angle from the rear sliding, leads you to roll right off the tire.

When your body isn't hanging off the bike, you don't have the strength to get the bike upright when it starts to slide. So you all of a sudden become a passenger and the next thing that happens is a crash.

I've dragged pegs for years, never had a problem because of that. You'd be surprised at how much abuse a solid peg can take before it lifts the rear end of the bike off the ground. The fold up pegs the bikes come with, will simply fold out of the way. I use my toe slider to determine lean angle, thats how low my pegs were and how much lean angle I was carrying. The only way to carry that much lean is to have a super huge contact patch, which only comes from running the right tire and pressures.

So yea, just a few tips. I'd like to see what you look like in other corners. Post a few more pix from the weekend if you have 'em. ;)
 

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Good to know. I run Pirelli SuperCorsa SC2 tires at recommended track pressure (typically 24r / 29f) but I haven't yet popped for tire warmers, so I take 2-3 laps to get them up to temp. I know I should be able to do it in a lap (so I'm told) but my testicular fortitude is not impressive.
Ok got ya. Probably a bit of cold tire syndrome as well.

I know the supercorsa's pretty well and use to run 24/31 on the warmers. Much over 26psi in the rear, can cause a slippery condition due to too little contact patch. So if you started with 24 in the rear cold, they might have been around 28 during your laps.

Next time your at the track, see if someone has a pyrometer. Then after a session, get over to them and measure your tire temp's. You'll loose a bit coming off the track, but at least you can get a judgment on where they are. Then get a good, accurate measurement of tire pressures. I find MOST pressure gauges to be wrong. Two PSI is a big deal in roadracing and thats a common discrepancy between gauges.

Unfortunately my trackday on the Duc ended prematurely before other photos could be had. :smoking: Here are some pics from previous visits to Infineon on a Daytona 675. Critique away -
Kool. ;)

You ride a bit crossed up meaning, your butt is off the seat, but your chest is on the tank. You may hear other people say this is an acceptable riding technique, but if you wish to pick up speed and feel more comfortable on the bike, I highly suggest working hard get your head out from behind that bubble.

If you have a rear stand which is strong, you can practice this in the garage by simply hanging off the bike to feel what its like. Maybe you've gotta make some adjustments to your bar position so you can hang off better? I had to make lots of adjustments to my Duc's in order to feel secure in this sort of riding.

The second tip/trick is to limit your time on the side of the tire by finding an apex in a corner, driving towards that apex and brining the bike up right on exit. You shouldn't be hard on the throttle at max lean angle, that doesn't work. You need to be on the meat of the tire in order to use throttle. A lot of people think that painted inside line is where you wanna put your knee, but in reality, its just an outline of the track. WIth big long corners, you still need to enter from the wide line, hit an apex and exit on the wide line. If you work on lines, even if you're slow, it will help greatly pickup your speed because you will have so much more room to break and exit.

Keith Codes book "A Twist of the Wrist" is a great tool at learning how to deal with these things and most importantly how to dissect corners and understand where max lean angle comes into play.

Hope some of that makes sense! :)
 
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