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Hello all, I purchased my 1098s in July so this will be my first cold weather season with it. I live in South Georgia so it shouldn't get too bad. Anyways, today I rolled out the bike to my driveway and washed it. After I dried it and left it sitting between 30- 1hr I started it up. I noticed steam coming from the radiator it fogged my mirrors and tach. I turned it off and started to look for a crack or leak. Couldn't find one off the top so I took off one of the fenders. Looked didn't see anything so I started it up again and when it warmed up it started to do the same again I looked and can't see a crack or leak. Does it have anything to do with the fact that it's a bit cold outside and the bike is producing heat? Thank you for your help in advance. Also at what temp is the fan on the radiator supposed to turn on? Thanks
 

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Sounds like it's from washing it to me. Maybe water collected somewhere you were unaware of and it's just steam?

Don't know when the fan comes on unfortunately.
 

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almost certainly down to washing it - i've noticed exactly the same thing after getting caught in the rain. If i leave it on after i pull over, steam everywhere!

fans come on at 104C, which i think is 220F.
 

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Yea sounds pretty normal to me. Let the bike warm up and that will tell you a lot. If there is a leak, there will be radiator fluid pouring out of it once the engine is hot.
 

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After washing it, drying it always go for a ride right away to shake the rest of the water/moisture. Steam up is normal.
 

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Perfectly normal, the radiator and oil cooler hold water like sponge. Best to take it for a ride and get everything warmed up, especially if your are like 99.99% other owners that run an open clutch. Water left sitting in there causes nothing but problems.
 

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Go easy with the garden hose. I personally never use it. Clean rags and maybe some glass cleaner or bug remover and some elbow grease might save you some headaches especially if you tend to spray water on an open clutch or the chain or electrical components...
 

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Yeah, I never use water, hate it when it is a wet/rain race or practice. Takes hours to wipe, clean, and shine..... I was raised on Lucas Electronics, which ironically, Lucas was first a Plumber.
 

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Probably wasn't very good at it. Too many leaks.

Thought he'd give electrics a go.

Bet he stranded more motorists and motorcyclists than any other single manufacturer.

The Prince of Fucking Darkness.

Making a rectifier out of double-sided copper and lead washers, and using a Zener diode out of a radio to run off excess charge to a heat-sink - he was nothing if not ambitious.

To think of the interstate trips in isolated country we did on such technology.

I'm suddenly reminded of Tye, proudly standing on the running board of a steam engine..

:eek:
 

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:laughing::laughing::laughing:

If memory serves, Lucas prolly changed his business calling during a War. "A Call To Duty"!! Whatever!! I do remember changing, amount other systems, the ignition to something other than the Lucas points/condenser set-up, maybe a Boyer Ignition, distributed by Brian Slark Classic Motorcycles. A super guy, now the Museum Director @ Barber. I do believe Lucas and Amal had something in common.... the stuff kinda work, kinda sometimes!! I ended up on my Norton racebike with (among a bunch of other "mods"), Delorto carbs, and a Magneto to generate and time the spark, bump starting was the preferred way of starting. Also the Quafe 5 speed gear clusters were a trip!!! Folks like Ron Wood, and Axtell, were US pioneers in making Norton 750/850s
very fast and kinda reliable!!! Great times.
 

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Yes well you've just reminded me of a lot of things I was happy to forget there Bob. Amal carbs for one..
Not the Barber Museum - loved that. :)
But all the stuff we used to have to do just to get those old things to go properly. They sold them to us only three-quarters finished.
But the Ducatis of the time - while better than the British stuff - needed a fair bit of 'improving' as well. The electrics on '70s Ducatis weren't all that clever for what had previously been an electrical company!
The reality is that those fantastic bikes from our 'yoof' look a lot better in the museum than stuck by the roadside in the rain, after failing yet again from an original design fault!
They were good old days, for sure, but we couldn't have dreamed bikes would become as good as they have.
'Specially if you get the right brand!
;)
 
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