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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey guys,

Been a long time Ducati fan and a lover of Italian sport bikes. I have a 2008 Aprilia RSV1000R currently and owned a 2000.5 RSV Mille. I have the opportunity to purchase a 2008 Ducati 1098S Biposto with almost 18k miles. Has a full termignoni Exhaust plus ECU and Tune, Woodcraft rear sets, upgraded Slave cylinder, Accossato Quick throttle, after market levers, and maybe a few other things i may be forgetting. Has all the maintenance on file as well as Dyno Tunes before and after the Termi upgrade. He is also willing to give me all the extra parts that he still has. What do you think is a fair price I should pay? I dont know if it was down, but if it was, then it was fixed and a minor wreck. So take that into account.

Forgot to mention, The owner had the 15k mile service done as well. Supposedly the bike has been meticulously maintained mechanically. I got to ride it for an hour and absolutely fell in love with the bike. Weight is about 100lbs lighter than my Ape, and the power is incredible.
 

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Welcome to the forum!

I assume you're referring to US miles and not K's right? If thats the case, 18k is quite a lot for these bikes. Most people who own 1098/1198's are finding bottom end failures occur around the 20 - 25k mark, meaning you COULD be buying someone else's problem without knowing.

A few tidbits for ya… The Aprilia RSV1000 weighs about 425lb dry and the 1098 is around 415 dry. So the difference in weight is nominal. I've ridden LOTS of RSV1000's and they're very nice bikes, but no Ducati, not even close. The Aprilia feels like riding a Sherman tank around, it's fat and everything feels like it's meant to be ridden by a big bloke, kinda polar opposite to the Duc. So thinking about buying a Ducati superbike is an A+ idea right there!

Unfortunately, there really isn't anything you can do before purchasing a bike to prepare yourself for the inevitable. An oil test will let you know if there is something wrong, but usually it doesn't show anything until it's way too late. So you've gotta be very mindful when purchasing and in my eyes, the price should be rock bottom as a consequence. If there wasn't a single other Ducati around and this was the only bike, I'd low ball the ever living crap out of the owner. We're talking 8k, not a dime more. I tell ya, high mileage Duc's, especially 1098/1198/848 (because there were so many made) they're just not worth the aggravation. Just move onto the next one ya know?

If I were you, I'd keep looking around. I vastly prefer the 1198 over the 1098 internally. Ducati did many substantial updates which help with longevity, including changing bearing manufacturers. So finding a lower mileage (sub 10k) bike which has only had a valve check is perfect in my view. Ride it until it needs a belt change, do an oil test and if everything comes out great, then keep riding it until it blows up. You may get another 15k out of it without a problem.

Thats just my opinion, but it's worth thinking about. ;)
 
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A few good points there from Tuned. As someone who owned an RSVR1000 Factory and now has a 1098R, I'd suggest you have a good long ride first, if you haven't already, as they're quite different propositions. The Aprilias are way more user friendly than 1098s, while they are also much more reliable (expecte 50k plus miles with no problem, compared wit Tuned's prognosis for the Duc) and cheaper to run: no belts to change, no dry clutches to die on you, no desmo valves to re-set, etc.

Interestingly, I think the Aprilia also feels more agile than a 1098 that's set up in a standard way. My 1098 was a revelation, compared with others I'd ridden, but then I realised the rear ride height had been jacked way up to quicken the steering.

Bottom line: not everyone who likes Aprilias is going to like the Duc.
 

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Don't let these panseys get you down....If you fell in love in the first hour, imagine what an entire summer will feel like...no other bike has given me the feeling and emotions my Ducati's have. I'm willing to pay what it costs to ride them...let's face it, these bikes are cheap compared to a Ferrari....

Good luck!
 

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I agree with Johnny
I recently purchased my 07 1098S Tri
it had 8400 km on the clock and cost me 13K
most 1098S with similar K in my area sell for 10.5-11.5K range,
this was the tricolore the one I had been looking for
I've owned a 996 and a 999 before this one
Ducati's are an acquired taste, and yes they need maintenance, I'm 44 and have had many motorcycles over the years both sport and cruiser
nothing puts a smile on my face like my Ducati does, everything eventually breaks down, if the service records are available, shows it was maintained, if it's what you want get it
or else you won't be happy with the alternative
enjoy the ride be safe
Carlo
 

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I have a 2008 Aprilia RSV1000R currently and owned a 2000.5 RSV Mille. I have the opportunity to purchase a 2008 Ducati 1098S Biposto with almost 18k miles.
The 1098S will most likely out perform and handle better than your RSV Ape.

The V4 Apes are completely different animals though.

As for 1098S pricing, it basically worth what someone is willing to pay for it. Hit KBB & NADA for a ball park figure -)
 
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I've ridden my old 2000.5 Mille R for almost 50,000 miles before I decided to buy a new Factory which I ended up running down a ravine . . . at a later point I purchased my current 1098 which is a decision I've never regretted! The Ducati is FAR more bike than my Ape ever was! That isn't something I would worry about as long as the price is right. Unfortunately I bought the previous owners many little and bigger problems which I ended up having to fix but if you have any doubts about swapping one bike brand for the other, don't worry, you're doing the right thing
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Wow thanks guys! I love my ape, she is a beauty in her own right, but when I litterally started up the ducati, I got the biggest grin on my face. When I rode it, it felt nimble almost litterally like I was riding a 600 again. The bottom end falling out Defintiely scares me a bit. I will say I am mechanically inclined, as I have worked on cars since I was a teen. I haven't done too much with bikes, I know how to change oil, replace brake pads, take wheels offf, replace sprockets and chains, replace brake fluid. Never messed with the motors yet but I really want to learn how to check valves and rebuild if need be.

I go to the track a few times a year, and usually the rest is canyon carving.

With all this being said, what if I told you the guy offered it to me for sub 7500k, nothing wrong with it just an older guy, I believe in his late 60's, that has had his fun and wants to get rid of it? Put most of his miles on it doing highway rides.
 

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I think with these bikes, it can boil down to a few factors.

a. If it was put together correctly in the factory in the first place (a Friday bike or a Wednesday bike). This can be the luck of the draw.

b. How the previous owner(s) treated the bike. Also, how many owners it has had. Just to clarify: If the previous owner comes across as being a squiddly twat, then I would steer clear of it. Also, if it has had several owners, I would be wary, as you really don't know what type of persons have owned the bike.

c. Regular maintenence and documented service history as per the manual. Oil changes, oil changes, oil changes.

d. Whether it has spent it's entire life on the rev limiter, front wheel up and all that,

e. Whether it has been dropped and left running on its side for a period of time.

Of course, some of these are unknown's.

I don't want to go down the me, me, me track, however I purchased a 1 owner 08' 1098 in 2009 with 2,100 klm's. The previos owner was mature and not a twat. The bike was pristine and unmolestered. The bike now has 30,000 klm's and has been problem free. It still has the original battery. It has spent most of it's life on open country roads and twisties and regularly hits the 180+ kph.

You have pat 1098, who has just stripped down a 1098 motor with 65,000 klm's and the bottom end was fine. I don't think Pat babies his bike either. On the other hand. I have read 1X98's and 848's crapping out at 5000 miles.

The 1098 is an awesome machine, I still thoroughly enjoy mine. I'm sure you will too. Just be wary of its history.

That's my advice, for what it's worth.
 

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With all this being said, what if I told you the guy offered it to me for sub 7500k, nothing wrong with it just an older guy, I believe in his late 60's, that has had his fun and wants to get rid of it? Put most of his miles on it doing highway rides.
Sub $7500? And you're willing to fix it? Then buy it! Don't even bat an eye, just get it. For that price, if the bearings go bad, you'll still be in the positive! ;)
 
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Discussion Starter #11
She is getting dropped off tomorrow, thanks for all the wonderful feedback! Looking forward to being a Ducati owner finally! I also found out the ECU that is installed is a Nemesis. I may need some extra plastics if anyone has any lying around in decent shape.
 

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The ape welcomes the Duck :D
That's a great pic.. didn't know you were keeping the Ape as well -

Here's to enjoying them both:friday:
 
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That's a great pic.. didn't know you were keeping the Ape as well -

Here's to enjoying them both:friday:
Thanks man, and I put insurance on it today and come to find out my aprilia costs more to insure than the duc... I wonder why. 1/2 to be exact. Also in really trying to get used to the dry clutch, not letting it slip when I take off. Any way to donut irbid it just practice?
 

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Thanks man, and I put insurance on it today and come to find out my aprilia costs more to insure than the duc... I wonder why. 1/2 to be exact.
Most Ducati and Aprilia owners pay less in insurance as apposed to Japanese sport bike riders. Reason being because 'lifestyle' bikes are typically owned by older individuals that put in few to little claims.

As for the Ape being more expensive, a local agent told me that many owners track them more frequently. Seems that they have seen an increase in comprehensive claims recently too. Could be a bunch of BS.. might wanna shop around if you can to save a couple of bucks.
 
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Discussion Starter #19
Yeah I thought about shopping. Around: do you know any other good insurance companies for motorcycle enthusiasts? I currently have State Farm for my car, renters, and both bikes.
 

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Thanks man, and I put insurance on it today and come to find out my aprilia costs more to insure than the duc... I wonder why. 1/2 to be exact. Also in really trying to get used to the dry clutch, not letting it slip when I take off. Any way to donut irbid it just practice?
A quick fix for the slipping clutch blues is to replace the 15 tooth counter sprocket with a 14 tooth. You will be slower at top end but it makes leaving the driveway a breeze.
 
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