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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2012 1199 Panigale. I've had the bike for sometime now but I'm the second owner. It has over 11,000 miles on it and it's time to change the chain and sprockets. The original owner installed a quick-change unit on the rear but I can't find any identifying markings. Can anyone identify the brand from the picture? I've searched many makes but haven't seen a rear sprocket like this one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Quick-change Sprocket (cont.)

OK. OK. OK... more than 70 members have viewed this post. I can't believe that nobody can identify this piece. A friend of mine who works for Ducati couldn't identify it either... so I'll go a different route. When changing your front/rear sprockets and chain on a quick-change unit most, if not all, manufacturers will ask you to use their carrier, probably for compatibility/fitment reasons. Does anyone have any thoughts on using a sprocket and chain set from another manufacturer? You could possibly measure mounting bolt centerline to centerline to ensure the sprocket will bolt up to the quick-change flange and you could measure the rear sprocket offset where it mounts to the quick-change flange to ensure the chain travels true to the chain guide. Anyone have any thoughts?
 

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Court Jester
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OK. OK. OK... more than 70 members have viewed this post. I can't believe that nobody can identify this piece. A friend of mine who works for Ducati couldn't identify it either... so I'll go a different route. When changing your front/rear sprockets and chain on a quick-change unit most, if not all, manufacturers will ask you to use their carrier, probably for compatibility/fitment reasons. Does anyone have any thoughts on using a sprocket and chain set from another manufacturer? You could possibly measure mounting bolt centerline to centerline to ensure the sprocket will bolt up to the quick-change flange and you could measure the rear sprocket offset where it mounts to the quick-change flange to ensure the chain travels true to the chain guide. Anyone have any thoughts?

Ok I'm guilty.. but I'm just now purchasing my first aftermarket set and there are at least 5 different ones out there and most if not all say they are not interchangeable.

But I say if it fits it works... have you taken it apart to look for markings? I feel you pain because when deciding which brand to go with I know I have to stay with that brand, I went with Driven.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I haven't removed the carrier but on the quick-change mounting flange and the rear sprocket I can't locate any identifying markings... and as you can see in the photo there are no markings on the exterior of the carrier either. Most manufacturers love to advertise their products even if it's nothing more than a small logo or visible part number like you might find on a JT sprocket. I'm inclined to agree with you. I think if I can find a set that will bolt up/match up I'll be good to go. I'm in Cambodia... parts can be had but it's not easy and not quick. :)
 

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Court Jester
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I haven't removed the carrier but on the quick-change mounting flange and the rear sprocket I can't locate any identifying markings... and as you can see in the photo there are no markings on the exterior of the carrier either. Most manufacturers love to advertise their products even if it's nothing more than a small logo or visible part number like you might find on a JT sprocket. I'm inclined to agree with you. I think if I can find a set that will bolt up/match up I'll be good to go. I'm in Cambodia... parts can be had but it's not easy and not quick. :)
If you have the tools (socket and impact gun) It' not that hard to remove it so you can see the back side of both the carrier and the sprocket. I think it's worth the effort before you buy and at the very least you can trace and measure the bolt pattern.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks. There is a guy in town from Germany that teaches motorbike repair at a vocational school. He has an impact gun; I only have basic hand tools. It might save me in the long run to pay him a visit. Labor here is dirt cheap. He installed a new fork for me around four months ago... ten dollars. Try to do that in the States.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Update: I corresponded with a seller on Ebay with regards to sprockets and carriers for the 1199 Panigale. He viewed the photo I posted and said with almost 100% certainty that the sprocket was a modified/fabricated piece. That had crossed my once before and would explain why I can't locate anything like it on the internet... scary. Buyer beware yeah? You can't tell from the photo but the QC carrier is an AFAM PCD-4 unit.
 

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Court Jester
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I just got my driven carrier and sprocket, while the sprocket did have markings on the outside the carrier was on the inside. Just an FYI.

Thanks for the update!
 

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Take the sprocket off and look closely. They all have markings on them, at least for the number of teeth. If there is no marking at all, then it's probably some sort of custom made one (though not sure why anyone would go through the trouble of that). If you know the carrier is an AFAM, then just buy an AFAM sprocket to be safe.
 

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It looks like a stock sprocket drilled for a aftermarket carrier..
That might very well be the case.

Still...don't get the point of doing that. Buy $20k bike....machine sprocket so you can save yourself $30-$50 for a new sprocket :confused:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Apparently, the sprocket is a fabricated piece and I said the same thing to myself... why, why would anyone spend that kind of money on a bike and use a fabricated piece on it? I've identified the carrier as an AFAM PCD-4 unit. AFAM sprockets for this unit are relatively inexpensive, with respect to the cost of the bike, and are easily obtainable. I can't explain why anyone would fabricate the piece. Since I want to change the front/rear sprockets and the chain I'm looking at some of the kits available from AFAM now.
 

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It def looks like someone bought a new quick change sprocket carrier then hacked up the stock sprocket to make it fit.

Contact Drive Systems and I bet they'll have a sprocket to fit that carrier if it's an AFAM. They have their own brand now and I believe it is same pattern as AFAM.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
It took long enough but the replacement parts finally arrived. I was able to identify the carrier as an AFAM PCD-4 unit. I removed the old 39T rear sprocket (which was trashed) as well as the front sprocket. The front sprocket showed only minimal wear. I installed a 41T Superlite RS7 Series 525 Pitch Steel Rear QC Sprocket and a Superlite 525 Pitch Chromoly Front Sprocket along with a 525 ZVX3 Heavy Duty X-Ring chain from EK Chains.

The sprocket set is a longevity set. You’ll save a little weight and experience better performance running alloy sprockets; they’re a good choice for the track. However, I’m not running at the track; selecting components that are reliable, long-lasting and offer an acceptable level of performance is what influenced my decision to purchase these components.

What does changing from a 39T rear sprocket to a 41T rear sprocket mean? Look at the attached photo and you’ll see what it means on paper. In the real world when you have to putt around in city traffic it helps to smooth the bike out a little. When you get outside of town and get into it… it’s nice.

Try to find a place to install a rivet-type master link here where I live in Cambodia… good luck. Fortunately, EK Chains offers a solution. The 525 ZVX3 Series chains are rated for bikes displacing up to 1300cc’s and the chain accepts the EK Chains SLJ Screw-Type master link shown below. Perhaps nothing beats the rivet-type link for maximum strength but the SLJ link runs a close second. The SLJ link is super easy to install and costs about $14.00 USD. See attached photo.

If your bike is fitted with a QC carrier changing the front/rear sprockets and the chain is fairly easy.

1. Remove your old chain. I cut my chain off as it had reached the end of its service life.
2. Remove the (6) nuts retaining your rear sprocket to the carrier.
3. Remove the old rear sprocket
4. Install the new rear sprocket on to the carrier.
5. Install the (6) retaining nuts and torque as required.
6. Remove the bolt holding the shift rod assembly to the gear shift bracket and remove the assembly.
7. Remove the two screws retaining the front sprocket cover and remove. You may have to gently pry this piece clear of the bike.
8. Place the bike in a driven gear (I selected 3rd) and loosen/remove the bolt and washer retaining the front sprocket. Remove the front sprocket.
9. Install the new front sprocket.
10. Install the retaining bolt and washer and torque as required.
11. Feed the new chain from the rear of the bike along the chain guide on the swing arm and continue to feed the chain around the front sprocket. Let the slack rest on the ground.
12. Prepare/lube the SLJ link and insert the link in to both ends of the chain.
13. Rotate the chain so that the master link is positioned on the rear sprocket. Final assembly of the SLJ master link is easiest to perform at this location.
14. Complete SLJ master link installation per instructions.
15. Reinstall the front sprocket cover and secure with (2) screws removed previously.
16. Reinstall the bolt used to secure the shift rod assembly to the gear shift bracket.
17. Adjust the chain as described in service manual.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I neglected to include a copy of the chain tensioning procedure. I've read several posts in the past where members were unsure how to adjust the chain properly so I'm adding a copy to this post. A properly tensioned chain will help prevent premature drive component and transmission component wear and help ensure rider safety. The procedure below is for a 2012 Panigale 1199. Refer to the attached photos.

Adjusting the chain tension:

Make the rear wheel turn until you find the position where chain is tightest.
Set the vehicle on the side stand.
With just a finger, push down the chain at the point of measurement and release.
Measure the distance between the center of the chain pins and the aluminum section of the swingarm: it must be between 50 ÷ 52 mm. (2 inches)


Important:

If the drive chain is too tight or too slack, adjust it so that tension reading will fall within specified range.
Loosen the two screws (1) fastening the rear hub to the swingarm.
Use the pin wrench part no. 88713.1038, inserting its tooth in the eccentric hub (2). (A large flat blade screwdriver and hammer will do the trick too… if you want to mutilate you eccentric hub. If you don’t have the proper tool and don’t want to order one from Ducati there are after-market choices available. I purchased the one shown below and it works well)
Turn eccentric hub (2) to obtain the correct chain tension.
Turn anticlockwise to tighten the chain; turn clockwise to loosen it (from chain side).

Important:

An incorrectly tensioned chain will lead to accelerated wear of the transmission components.
If screws (1) are removed, smear under head and thread with the recommended grease, then, tighten screws (1) to a torque of 25 Nm ±5%, following the sequence 1-2-1.

Warning:
For the safety of the rider and passenger, it is essential that the eccentric hub screws are correctly tightened.

 

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If you like the rivet style chains there are plenty of chain-break/rivet tools available online that would ship to you. MotionPro is one that comes to mind but look at any motorcycle parts website and they should have one.

Great write-up by the way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thanks. Yeah, I've seen a selection of chain break/rivet installation tools online and I know a rivet-type link will rate slightly higher than the SLJ link. Nevertheless, the SLJ screw-type link is rated and safe for use on superbikes with large engine cc displacements so I decided to give it a try. It was very easy to install. It's difficult to see but it's shown in this post sitting at the 3 o'clock position on the rear sprocket. To install a rivet-type link I would have to purchase a chain break/rivet installation tool as you mentioned; I couldn't find a shop in town that had the proper tool. You may be able to find almost any make or model of bike here but finding a facility with the proper tools and expertise required to service the bike is an entirely different story.
 
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