Ducati.org forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Guys, I am new to the site and new to Ducati's. I have owned Jap bikes for the last 12 years and finally just bought my first ducati.

I know a little about dry clutches and undestand how they work including the famous rattle. My question is, my new bike has a grinding noise at low RPM whilst in gear. It goes away once underway as rpm increases. Its really just off the mark. Is this normal ?

The clutch noise also changes dramatically when clutch is pulled in and let out whilst in neutral. I'm used to a slight change in noise on the wet clutches but I'm assuming this is normal ?

Justin
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
228 Posts
All entirely normal.

You'll need to re-learn which gear you should be in and when. Normal to have a little grinding noise when releasing the clutch.

What bike do you have, year, mileage, etc - might help rule other bits out...

Welcome to the Ducati world. ;-)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,230 Posts
:popcorn:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,020 Posts
A grinding noise can be somewhat subjective. But for safety's sake, definitely not normal. Is it indeed grinding, or perhaps a howling from slipping the clutch at take-off?

These bikes buck a lot at low rpms; they don't like to be ridden slowly. So, if at low speed it feels rough - power pulsing on/off/on/off - with the bike "knocking", then yes, that is normal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you guys, it's a 2009 1198S with 11,000 klms.

Always hard to describe something like this but here we go. For a mere moment just after slipping the clutch to take off just as the clutch is fully released, there is a howling noise. It happens only at take off at low rpm. Could possibly be at the very very end of of clutch release maybe it's just the dry clutch at the final stages of grab ?

Sounds like sliding a table with metal legs along a tiled surface lol. Happens only for a split second.

To give a better picture, It happens on a smooth take off. Just wanting to take away the vision of a bumbling stumbling fool taking off with the bike engine bucking haha...

The operative word is now howl not grind :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
226 Posts
Others call it screeching or shrieking. Not entirely normal but not uncommon either nor is it particularly damaging. Search this and other forums for "shrieking clutch". Try taking it apart and cleaning the frictions with brake cleaner and and the steels with scotchbrite. Mine does it when the clutch is really hot. Try to get into the habit of not letting the clutch slip. Do this by always releasing the clutch with purpose while applying throttle in one smooth motion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
Here is my experience with my 1198SP with a slipper clutch. I believe this noise is normal to a certain degree for Ducati clutches. I tried many methods found on forums. I tried sanding the steel plates down and cleaning clutch plates with lithium grease. BTW.. I wouldn't do the lithium grease again. What finally fixed it for me was replacing my clutch and steel plates with new ones from Yoyodyne. I cant say enough about them as I had this problem with more then one Ducati. I haven't heard that horrible noise since the swap (3K Miles).
Slipper and Lightweight Clutch
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,127 Posts
As others have stated, the "take-off" clutch grinding/squealing noise is common place with the stock Ducati metal friction disks. They don't like to slip, so when they do slip, they make this god awful noise. There truthfully isn't any way to fix the issue without replacing parts.

As runaway said above, moving your friction plates from steel to aluminum will solve most of the problems, but they add another complication which is tab wear. The steel plates last a lot longer because the tabs don't wear that quickly. So when you go to aluminum tabs, it's a wise idea to also go with an aluminum basket, that will help the tabs not wear so quickly.

The best solution is to upgrade to 48 pin friction plates. This quiets down the kit substantially. Runway posted a link above to Yoyodyne's kit's and a few other manufacturers make similar. I highly suggest doing a slipper with the big piston high compression 1198, it's nice to have even on the street.

You can make the dry clutches pretty quiet with the 48 pin and VERY reliable (long lasting) if you keep them cool with an open cover.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
I come from Japanese bikes too (and still own a GSXR1000 K6), and that take-off clutch sound had me thinking: holy crap! What the hell is going on??
I actually searched (can't remember if it was here or elsewhere that I found it) and did the grease thing on the plates. I know it's anti-intuitive, but it works, and it's been about 2,000 klm now, with no negative issues, and in fact is a quieter, better feeling clutch at take off.
Do the steps in the thread. Don't short-cut. I'm very happy with the result.
I know it's not entirely consistent with conventional knowledge, but it works, with no negatives that I have come across.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top