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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone else racing @ Daytona March 17th - 19th? I'm heading down on the 16th and plan to race that weekend. First time racing @ Daytona so trying to figure out gearing and suspension setup for that track. Any tips from those who have raced @ Daytona on an 848?

Thanks,
 

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I'll be there, never ran an 848 but stock ratio works out well for Daytona. You basically want to tach out over the start finish. So start with stock, and make the adjustments. You'll have somewhere near 4 practice session before you race on Sunday if you're in the Twins race that is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'll be there, never ran an 848 but stock ratio works out well for Daytona. You basically want to tach out over the start finish. So start with stock, and make the adjustments. You'll have somewhere near 4 practice session before you race on Sunday if you're in the Twins race that is.
I'm doing the following races that weekend on a freshly built motor:

March 17th
ASRA Sportbike Qualifying
ASRA Superstock Qualifying
MW Supersport

March 18th
GTO or GTU

March 19th
ASRA Superstock
ASRA Superbike
Super Twins

I'm just wondering if I need to change my map to throw in more fuel in 5th and 6 gear as I will be pinned in 6 for a while.

I will also have to play around with the suspension a bit as it's currently setup for VIR.
 

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Like I said you'll have plenty of chances to make adjustments with all the practice, and qualifying. Keep in mind Daytona will pop a motor, especially factoring in the draft so the correct sprocket setup is crucial.

The track isn't hard, the infield isn't that technical, but the AW factor is off the charts. Daytona is an entity all in itself. You'll love it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Like I said you'll have plenty of chances to make adjustments with all the practice, and qualifying. Keep in mind Daytona will pop a motor, especially factoring in the draft so the correct sprocket setup is crucial.

The track isn't hard, the infield isn't that technical, but the AW factor is off the charts. Daytona is an entity all in itself. You'll love it.
That's my fear is pulling a Disalvo and blowing my freshly built motor @ Daytona. So I'm trying to decide if I should only race Super Twins and conserve my engine or go ahead and do my full schedule so I'll get a lot of track time and experience. Mainly racing @ Daytona for the experience and points for this year. :naughty:
 

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Lol that's what I'm saying. Definitely go with stock or down one in the rear just to be safe. You can always keep going up one until you get it right.

I agree do as much as you can, even if you don't place well just to get experience in. I ran 2 bikes last year there to get my experience up in March. Ran a Gsxr 750 in Superbike Unlimited, Superbike Heavyweight , Supersport Heavyweight, and Unlimited Supersport. I ran Twins with my Panigale 1199s, ended up going back and winning the Amateur National on it in October there during the ROC.
 

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Anyone else racing @ Daytona March 17th - 19th? I'm heading down on the 16th and plan to race that weekend. First time racing @ Daytona so trying to figure out gearing and suspension setup for that track. Any tips from those who have raced @ Daytona on an 848?

Thanks,
Wooohooooo!!! You will love it. Daytona is amazing and crazy and an amazing experience! I raced there for the first time in 2007 (holy shit 10 years ago!) and it was crazy. I went a week early to try and get practice before the AMA races but blew my motor on the banking after the first session. So we scrambled to ship my spare motor from Oregon out to Daytona in time for the AMA races and I literally had one practice day to get up to speed. What an awesome memory!

Do you have a plan for how to learn the track quickly? What are your methods when you arrive at a new track for picking it up?

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Wooohooooo!!! You will love it. Daytona is amazing and crazy and an amazing experience! I raced there for the first time in 2007 (holy shit 10 years ago!) and it was crazy. I went a week early to try and get practice before the AMA races but blew my motor on the banking after the first session. So we scrambled to ship my spare motor from Oregon out to Daytona in time for the AMA races and I literally had one practice day to get up to speed. What an awesome memory!

Do you have a plan for how to learn the track quickly? What are your methods when you arrive at a new track for picking it up?

Good luck!
That makes me a little nervous that your engine blew on the first session :wtf:

I wish they had a track day or a practice day that week but they are only giving us two practice sessions that Friday to learn the track. I figure I'm just going to watch a lot of the Daytona CCS/ASRA races from last year on youtube and also some of the Daytona 200 from last year. Study each riders lines and try to find what they are using as reference points on/off the track. I NEVER do well at a track I've never been to before so not expecting great results. I'm going down to Daytona to get the experience, learn the track and to get double points for my region.

Wish me luck :) :yo:
 

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That makes me a little nervous that your engine blew on the first session :wtf:



I wish they had a track day or a practice day that week but they are only giving us two practice sessions that Friday to learn the track. I figure I'm just going to watch a lot of the Daytona CCS/ASRA races from last year on youtube and also some of the Daytona 200 from last year. Study each riders lines and try to find what they are using as reference points on/off the track. I NEVER do well at a track I've never been to before so not expecting great results. I'm going down to Daytona to get the experience, learn the track and to get double points for my region.



Wish me luck :) :yo:

Good luck to you.
 

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That makes me a little nervous that your engine blew on the first session :wtf:

I wish they had a track day or a practice day that week but they are only giving us two practice sessions that Friday to learn the track. I figure I'm just going to watch a lot of the Daytona CCS/ASRA races from last year on youtube and also some of the Daytona 200 from last year. Study each riders lines and try to find what they are using as reference points on/off the track. I NEVER do well at a track I've never been to before so not expecting great results. I'm going down to Daytona to get the experience, learn the track and to get double points for my region.

Wish me luck :) :yo:
You need to change the fact that you "NEVER" do well at a new track. Here are a few things I do when I go to a new track to help me learn it quickly....and many of the AMA races I qualified for were on tracks that I had never ridden before!

So, make finding reference points your priority. Go out and look for things to locate you on the track, then when you come in DRAW THE TRACK FROM MEMORY! Don't copy a track map, just draw what you remember from memory. Keith Code made me do this when he was helping me race and while I hated it, I attribute it entirely to helping me learn the track quickly.

From there you can see what parts of the track are clear to you and where you need the most help. The places that are the most unclear are the ones to focus on during your next practice session.

I would also suggest that on the out lap or if there is a yellow or red flag or an entirely clear track, try taking the corner from a different line or riding the outside or inside edge of the track to give you a clear perspective and allow you the opportunity to see new RP's from different angles. This saved my ass a few times when I ended up off line or took a pass on the inside because I KNEW what to expect from the corner.

Once you have some solid RP's then work on stringing them together with your visual skills.

Ideally how many RP's would you want for any given corner? When are you supposed to move your eyes from one RP to the next?

GOOD LUCK!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
You need to change the fact that you "NEVER" do well at a new track. Here are a few things I do when I go to a new track to help me learn it quickly....and many of the AMA races I qualified for were on tracks that I had never ridden before!

So, make finding reference points your priority. Go out and look for things to locate you on the track, then when you come in DRAW THE TRACK FROM MEMORY! Don't copy a track map, just draw what you remember from memory. Keith Code made me do this when he was helping me race and while I hated it, I attribute it entirely to helping me learn the track quickly.

From there you can see what parts of the track are clear to you and where you need the most help. The places that are the most unclear are the ones to focus on during your next practice session.

I would also suggest that on the out lap or if there is a yellow or red flag or an entirely clear track, try taking the corner from a different line or riding the outside or inside edge of the track to give you a clear perspective and allow you the opportunity to see new RP's from different angles. This saved my ass a few times when I ended up off line or took a pass on the inside because I KNEW what to expect from the corner.

Once you have some solid RP's then work on stringing them together with your visual skills.

Ideally how many RP's would you want for any given corner? When are you supposed to move your eyes from one RP to the next?

GOOD LUCK!!!!
Thanks for the tips! :D
 

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So, make finding reference points your priority. Go out and look for things to locate you on the track, then when you come in DRAW THE TRACK FROM MEMORY! Don't copy a track map, just draw what you remember from memory. Keith Code made me do this when he was helping me race and while I hated it, I attribute it entirely to helping me learn the track quickly.
When I first starting doing track days I would see people sitting under the tent with their eyes closed riding the course...

I was so conflicted but yeah I get it now..

100% what Misti said!
 

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I did a penguin racing school with Erik Wood a few years back in NH. He gave us a good trick: get a stopwatch then try to visualize the course with your eyes closed as if you were actually on track. Hit stop when you "pass" the start/finish. Compare your actual lap times to how long it took you to visualize the whole track. Ideally they should be the same! I also do the same thing with GoPro videos. When I think I finished the lap I open my eyes to see where I was on the GoPro video. When you get good at it, it feels like you are in slow motion on track which allows you to relax even more.
 

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I did a penguin racing school with Erik Wood a few years back in NH. He gave us a good trick: get a stopwatch then try to visualize the course with your eyes closed as if you were actually on track. Hit stop when you "pass" the start/finish. Compare your actual lap times to how long it took you to visualize the whole track. Ideally they should be the same! I also do the same thing with GoPro videos. When I think I finished the lap I open my eyes to see where I was on the GoPro video. When you get good at it, it feels like you are in slow motion on track which allows you to relax even more.
Yes, great! Visualization is so important in many sports and this is a great suggestion. What do you think separates the good riders from the great riders in terms of their visual skills? What do the greats see that we regulars don't?
 

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Yes, great! Visualization is so important in many sports and this is a great suggestion. What do you think separates the good riders from the great riders in terms of their visual skills? What do the greats see that we regulars don't?
Interesting that I posted this question as the CSS email just came out with an article from Keith on Vision Evolution. Did anyone else get that and take a read? How does what he wrote relate to my question above?:D
 
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