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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So is reverse bleeding the way to go nowadays? For the brake and clutch? Can anybody link me to the reverse bleeders they prefer? I don't want to spend too, too much on one but don't want a POS either.
 

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All you need is a giant syringe (couple of hundred ml) and a short length of clear tube.
Most chemists (drug store?) should have the syringes for irrigation.
I always had trouble bleeding brakes, especially rear ones where the hose goes up and over the swing arm then down to the caliper.
I have a mityvac, but have found the syringe works better, You get a firm lever straight away.
 

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I recently bouught a Sram mountain bike bleeding kit.

They use screw in adaptors and two syringes..

Each syringe you need to snap lock the hose and then remove the air suspended in the brake fluid.

Bet you didn't know there was air IN the brake fluid..

Check out about 1.30 into the video.

Not much I know but it was surprising how much you get in 2-3 repeats of putting a vacuum on the syringe.

Can't see why this method could not achieve a better result for you, if you could get adaptors to suit.

 

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Jeezz... That's way more complicated than reverse bleeding a motorcycle hydraulic system.

A syringe is nice to remove fluid from the reservoir as you force new fluid in from the calipers.
 

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Not sure what you mean by legit hand pump system

 

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Not sure what reverse bleeding means. I use a Mitty Vac to bleed my brakes. Takes like 2-3 minutes for each side, and makes things very easy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Reverse means to push the fluid in from the caliper/clutch slave. The theory is it prevents any air from getting in the system doing it that way.
 

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Reverse means to push the fluid in from the caliper/clutch slave. The theory is it prevents any air from getting in the system doing it that way.
Interesting...I feel like it doesn't matter which way you do it, both ways prevent air from getting in the system if done correctly. But I would think it's easier to fill through the reservoir and let gravity do the work, instead of pushing fluid through the caliper. To each their own I guess...
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Well my thinking was to prevent the frequent bleeding of the slave. After the TD last month the clutch lever went from a good biting point to damn near the clip on. Got it home and bled the system and I'm GTG now. Now I'm reading they're kind of known for trapped air and bleeding will be more often depending on how one rides so I might just get the Oberon slave and be done. The reverse bleeding just sounded more efficient so I figured I'd give it a shot.
 

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Pushing fluid in from the bottom is fundamentally the best way of bleeding because theoretically it displaces the air properly and helps migrate it up into the master cylinder. If you simply fill the system and suck the fluid through, there will be a considerable amount of trapped air left in the system. Then you're futzing around with pumping the master and slaves to try and push the air bubbles up to the master and out. The smaller air bubbles don't really make much of a difference riding around town, but the moment you get on the track, you'll notice things like brake fade because the air has trapped moisture and it starts to boil under the high breaking temps.

With that said, I don't reverse bleed because I've found the nipples to let in a considerable amount of air. What I do is suck the fluid through the system with a fluid evacuator. Then I squeeze the slave cylinder so it forces fluid up into the master. This will literally push all the air bubbles right into the master. If you pump the lever once or twice and repeat this process, you can generally get all the air bubbles out without spending money on specialized tools, especially with clutch slave cylinders.
 

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I've bled brakes for umpteen years with good results. Pressure or vacuum on the nipple both work.

Here's a pro tip.
After a bleed stint with the duc the lever feel wasn't perfect. They as mine did can trap a bubble in the banjo fitting at the master. Bleed all you want and it won't go away. Wrap the area in paper towels and loosen and semi tighten the fitting. With an assistant have him apply a little lever pressure as you crack the banjo loose then tighten it before the lever hits the bar.

Done deal, better than new.
 
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We got a Phoenix system at work to try out, it's the professional model. It works good but pushes fluid out around bleeder screws. You need to seal them with Teflon tape. On the mountain bike bleeding video, I believe they use a fluid different from DOT 3/4. That may explain the air trapped in the fluid. As much brakes as we bleed on new builds and service work at work I have never seen air trapped in the fluid.
 

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You are a little correct.. They use 5.1

The system you use must be a pressure system. I have used one on old land rovers.. Never had a need since.

I have used vacuum bleeders but only to speed up the flush. Final bleed is still old fashioned. Personally I like gravity.

bleeders up and rotating levers is this first thing. I have seen people use 3 litres of fluid and 2 hours before findin the caliper upside down. Long term mechanics they were.
 
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