Ducati.org forum banner
1 - 20 of 57 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
449 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Earlier today...


Later today...


Draining HOT oil was about all I could handle before a frosty malt beverage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
480 Posts
Hopefully quite a few. Mine's about to hit 20,000 km (12,500 miles) -- it would be more if I had the same fab roads that Apollo has at his disposal!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
378 Posts
Hopefully quite a few. Mine's about to hit 20,000 km (12,500 miles) -- it would be more if I had the same fab roads that Apollo has at his disposal!
Hopefully not.

Mine has done 1599 (miles).

I can't believe you've done so many miles on such a pig of a bike...!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
480 Posts
Each to their own, of course, but the Desmo is no pig, not to me anyway. Like Apollo, I love to ride it (except on very bumpy roads...).
Like other owners, I've also taken the time and the money to adjust it to my own liking: 17-inch rims, slightly softer springs, better slipper clutch, Microtec ECU. And it's surprisingly good on the highway -- especially highways where you can sit on 140 to 150 kph with bursts to 180. Happy as a clam.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
378 Posts
Hopefully not.

Mine has done 1599 (miles).

I can't believe you've done so many miles on such a pig of a bike...!
Slightly flippant remark.....I'll take some of it back.....I love my Desmo....I even rode it around the block yesturday just to warm it up and get the oil flowing.....she's also a pretty thing...!

I think the English roads are in such poor condition its difficult to ride any superbike on them.

I have my 17's waiting to go on then I'll give her another run at Donington Park.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
480 Posts
Very pretty indeed. Stunning bike. The 17's will make a difference, especially on the racetrack. The bike needs a bit more weight over the front, from my experience. Once I changed the rims, softened the springs a bit and raised the rear a touch, the bike was much better behaved on the track and the road. Far less twitchy.
Sure you've done lots of setting up anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
449 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Progress has been slow due to other factors. Life does that.

Earlier, in addition to removing the side panels and belly pan, I had removed the gas tank.

During the past month and a half, to access the cams of the front cylinders I pulled hoses loose to drain the coolant, removed the radiator, pulled the oil cooler back around to the right out of the way and snipped a bunch of TyWraps to un-restrain the radiator shroud and push it up over the front fender out of the way. I removed the coils and front valve cover.

None of that was difficult. Although one of the very-special studs onto which the very-special valve cover nuts screw came out of the head stuck securely to the nut. I managed to get the stud out of the nut using Vise Grips. The studs are torqued into the head at 12 Nm and the valve cover nuts are torqued to 10 Nm. This fastener is one of four that retain a cam cap one of eight securing the valve cover. Thus it is not responsible for a critical load.

To access the cams in the rear cylinder I removed the gas tank, battery and battery box. Getting the cardboard fiber cover off that is under the battery box was a more of a challenge that involved removing some hose clamps , disconnecting the connection in the harness to the tail and unbolting the sub-frame in order to pull it back a bit. Before the subframe would go back far enough, the rear cowl had to be removed along with the muffler. Then the carbon cover came off. The valve cover has three rubber isolators screwed into it. Two of them partially block the twelve-point valve cover nuts. When I pushed one of the isolators aside a bit in order to get the socket on the nut, it broke. $6 for a new one. Next time I will grab the metal "washer" portion closest to the valve cover with Vise Grips and unscrew it. The coils came off easily. Removing the valve cover involved pulling the sub-frame back a bit, holding my mouth just right and jiggling the cover. It came off.

The spark plugs require a FOURTEEN millimeter spark plug wrench. However, the tunnels into which you stick that wrench are necked down about halfway down the tubes. With some difficulty I learned that an off-the-shelf, regulation, deep-well, thin-wall 14 mm socket is too big to fit. After extracting the tool which ALMOST fit that I managed to get stuck in there, I visited a pawn shop and bought a 14 mm deep-well socket and had a machinist friend turn it down to 0.745" in diameter. That FITS. After unscrewing the spark plugs, I used a magnet-on-a-stick tool to remove them.

Research on the web turned up some special 14 mm, thin-wall, deep-well, magnetic spark plug sockets for sale that work on certain models of BMW car motors that are likely small enough. I didn't want to order one without an outside-diameter measurement.

Thinking toward re-installing the plugs without just dropping them down the tubes, I modified my tool by cutting a pair of "donuts" from the cloth-backed foam rubber of an old mouse pad which I then secured inside the socket with silicon sealant. It will now hold a spark plug for installation or removal.

With the covers off and plugs out I should have been able to spin the motor. Unfortunately the tool for that purpose for all the rest of Ducati motors does not fit the Desmo. After a few measurements, I took an old six-point 5/8" (3/8" drive) spark plug socket and used my bench grinder to remove four of the six sides to a depth of about an eighth of an inch (~3 mm), leaving two opposite faces intact. Another measurement revealed that an 8x1.25 mm bolt 70 mm in length would pass through the 3/8" drive hole and secure the socket to crank. My particular socket has a 19 mm hex at the top. A 19 mm wrench spins the motor just fine. Almost there.

Yesterday I ordered a degree wheel for the tool. Today I plan to buy some 5/6" mild steel rod to weld to two of the flats of the hex at the top of the socket to make arms to simplify spinning the crank just like the factory tool. I should be able to spin the motor to TDC on each cylinder easily and measure all of the clearances within a few days.

In the past, for other reasons, I have removed and reinstalled both the air box and the exhaust system, both of which must be removed in order pull the heads from the crankcase. From where it sits, it LOOKS to me that if any of the rear cylinder valves are out of adjustment and the head needs to come off, it should be no problem. Similarly, it LOOKS like removing the front head may require removing the front wheel and fender. Time may tell...

If there is any interest, I can post a few photos.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,230 Posts
If there is any interest, I can post a few photos.
Excellent ! .. and here's a frosty malt beverage for you :friday:

Always up for observation and learning.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
449 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
First, the very special stud and valve cover nut.

Then a shot showing how the subframe pulls away from the frame and the head to allow the bulges in the valve cover for the camwheels to clear enough to remove the valve cover. In place, there is NFW the cover will come out.

A shot of the rear head.

A shot down the spark tunnel all the way to the (gold-looking) piston on TDC. The pistons are VERY clean. I've been running either Techron or Startron additive with every tank.

Then the front head.

Now that I think about it. if both heads need to come off, the motor is essentially dropped because it attaches to the frame with bolts that go into the heads. Maybe there is no "easy way" to do it.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
202 Posts
Apollo, you've gone quite far down the rabbit hole. Well done.

I've seen some shops that, when they drop the engine, the support the frame from the ceiling with a ratchet strap and the entire frame, airbox, forks, wheel, radiator, shroud assembly just separates and hangs. The engine is supported from below on an engine stand that engages the oil sump. MarkT made a very nice engine support, I roughed one up from 2x4s.

When separating the engine from the frame, the most difficult thing is unthreading the wiring harness that runs from the left side, across the bike in the valley of the engine to the right side.

I ended up buying the Desmo-specific spark plug socket and TDC gauge. When doing the leak-down test, the TDC gauge told me when each cylinder was a the top of the stroke.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
449 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
One item on the 15k mile service is to clean the pick-up screen. Based on my previous experience, that is PROBABLY a waste of time. I sure HOPE so. In any case, the sump has to come off to do that. (And the exhaust has to come off to remove the sump.)

Chris in Cincinnati traced the sump and sent me the tracing before he sold the motor to another forum member. I used that for the start of the hole in a chunk 'o nylon I bought as the starting point of an D16 engine cradle. With the sump off, I will trim up the hole in my piece of nylon for a "custom" fit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
258 Posts
MarkT made a very nice engine support, I roughed one up from 2x4s.

Hi Apollo ---here are a few pictures of the sump stand I made. I cut out the basic taper shape through different layers of wood screwed together. I used my sump as the mold plug and used molding plastic.

I would have just welded up a window frame or like you and Mal made one out of 2x4s which is just as functional-- but I cannot help myself.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
258 Posts
Ok, that's just sexy.



Thanks-- it is a nice looking lamp. My wife will no longer let me keep bikes in the house so I slipped in the motor and it hides behind the lamp.

Any update about your motor--- or do you have it in the bike and it is all up and running?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
378 Posts
Stone wall...

Thanks-- it is a nice looking lamp. My wife will no longer let me keep bikes in the house so I slipped in the motor and it hides behind the lamp.

Any update about your motor--- or do you have it in the bike and it is all up and running?
Awesome.....

Looks great against the stone wall.

Top Marks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
449 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Today I removed the front headers and the sump in order to clean the pick-up screen. This was pretty much a waste of time as expected. But I did get to "look up her skirt" with the sump off. While it was off, I finished up my nylon block that will be the engine stand. And I cleaned my K&N air filter. Tomorrow, after it is completely dry, I'll oil and re-install it. I'll put the sump back on, too.

I decided to go ahead and remove the sub-frame. At this point, there are only two bolts holding everything that's left to the rear of the motor, a suspension bolt (player's choice for which one of three gets removed) and the swing-arm bolt.

The 15k mile maintenance calls for measuring the shift forks and gear dogs for play. I've NEVER heard of this on a vehicle before. If the trans is working properly, why take it apart? Since the transmission is cassette type and comes out quite easily, I started on that item by removing the counter-shaft sprocket cover. By the time I was finished cleaning it, I had other non-bike things that needed to be done.

I am shooting photos of most of the items on the 15k mi. service in order to prove they were done should it ever be an issue. Some items are a bit wonky to try to shoot, like checking tightness on all the magnesium cover bolts. Some of them are irrelevant, like checking the coolant level because the radiator has been removed. Some are unnecessary like tire pressure and wear since I check those almost every time I ride.

By the way, my garage has a ceiling and I cannot easily suspend the front of the bike from non-existent rafters. If the time comes that I want to pull the front off of the motor, I'll have to install some eyes through the sheet rock into the joists above. I'd much rather work on my bike that screw around with that.
 
1 - 20 of 57 Posts
Top