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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,

I've been doing a lot of work on the bike recently, stripping down the fairing and the exhaust system, and getting the bike read for her first track day.

I keep finding that I'm rounding off the bolts trying to get them out and have had to drill out at least 7 bolts around the bike, from fairing to exhaust system to number plate holders.

I guess some are exposed to rust, but it's really annoying that I have to keep drilling them out and I keep doing minor damage or scratches to surrounding parts.

I keep putting WD40 on the bolts and leaving them a few days to soak in, and the bits I'm using on the Alan key set are fitting perfectly, it's just with the force of trying to break the rust lock that I'm rounding out the bolts.

My questions are:

Is this normal for the bike or are others finding this excessive

Do any of you have tips on what to do when you see a rusty bolt somewhere to stop rounding it off?
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
By the way, the bikes a 2013 848 Evo with 13000 km on the clock.
 

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use liquid wrench, also they make tools you can buy that will take off a rounded head. Drilling seems like a last attempt.
 

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My questions are:

Is this normal for the bike or are others finding this excessive

Do any of you have tips on what to do when you see a rusty bolt somewhere to stop rounding it off?
Never had this issue before .. sounds like your over tightening as well.

You can use a smidge of grease on the threads to avoid rust and locking ;)
 

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You shouldn't be having so much trouble with a 2013... I had my 2012 down to the engine and frame over the winter and only stripped out one exhaust heat shield bolt because I tightened the shit out of them to stop the damn things from vibrating loose and falling out. You mention rust though, does the bike sit outside?

When reassembling, use blue lock tight on what you can and torque to minimum specs and they should stay put. Some things you just can't get a torque wrench on so go snug plus a half turn. This has worked for me so far.
 

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Try a penetrant other than WD40 (Mouse Milk or Liquid Wrench) And if you use a 3/8 electric impact, it will help with the small shocks. Only issues I ever had were with red loctite, and I used a torch to break down the loctite.
 

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Yeah, that sounds excessive. My 07 1098 was always garage kept so maybe I've been more protected from rust than usual. But very minimal rust on mine. Impact wrenches are huge if you can get it on a bolt. And as others have said, try a stronger penetrant than WD40. Just be careful where the overspray goes
 

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one important thing is a good set of metric tools with quality allen bits. I have only stripped the heads on the oil gauze filter plate but that seems to be the most common. If you use sae tools, they may seem to fit slightly loose and will strip eventually. I have seen people do this before and complain that they should have used an impact.
 

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Could very well be cheap tools. I am the master of snapping bolt heads on everything i work on and have not done it to my duc yet! Ease that grip or get a torque wrench man! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Cheers for the feedback.

I've only recently started working on the bike myself, all the previous work is either from the factory or from the dealer.

It was sat outside for two years before I moved and got a garage, but it was always covered with a waterproof cover so I thought that would help. Obviously not!

Next on the list of tools is a torque wrench and some of this liquid wrench stuff. What torque range do your wrenches have? I've been looking but there seem to be a few different ranges available and whilst I looked in the workshop manual, there seem to be hundreds and I haven't tabulated it in excel to find the most common ranges. I'm handy with a spanner, but never to torque-level precision.

I think next step, now that it's out of warranty and I'm getting familiar with the bike, is to strip it down to the frame over the winter and redo all the bolts at the right settings with grease and loctite.
 

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Good quality Allens are a must. I use Snap On brand, not sure if they are available to you in Switzerland.

Can't remember the last time I rounded off a bolt.

I have all sizes of Allens in 1/4" and 3/8" and a few in 1/2" drive.

They are expensive, but they last forever, I'm only had to replace one and that was because I lost it.

 

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Next on the list of tools is a torque wrench and some of this liquid wrench stuff. What torque range do your wrenches have? I've been looking but there seem to be a few different ranges available and whilst I looked in the workshop manual, there seem to be hundreds and I haven't tabulated it in excel to find the most common ranges. I'm handy with a spanner, but never to torque-level precision.

I think next step, now that it's out of warranty and I'm getting familiar with the bike, is to strip it down to the frame over the winter and redo all the bolts at the right settings with grease and loctite.

I keep two torque wrenches in my tool box:

3/8" drive with a capacity of 5-110 N-m

and

1/2" drive with a capacity of 34-339 N-m

For the work that I've done on my 09 848, the nut with the highest torque value is the flywheel nut, which is 330 N-m. You may not have the need for a torque wrench with that capacity today, but if you're going to start doing your own maintenance, eventually you will. I torque just about everything that has a value in the manual. The only exceptions are some of the bolts with low torque values (under 5 N-m in my case); for those I just snug em down and use my own judgement, and if it's an area that is prone to a bolt working loose, I use blue threadlocker.

If you're going to start doing your own maintenance a torque wrench (or two), and some other tools specific to this bike are essential.
 

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All tools are not equal. I only use snap on.

I agree that all tools are not equal.
My boxes have a combination of
Snap on ( when I worked at a dealer
Mac
Craftsman
KTC( Kyoto tool company) comparable quality to snap on
If you do your own work or some of it invest in the quality just like we do with our bikes
 

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Use Hazet or Stahlwille allen sockets, they fit better than any major brand including snapon mac and matco. When removing bolts on exhaust, heat them with a small butane torch then soak them in a penetrating oil, wurth makes some good prouts that will be local to you. When you seat the socket in the bolt, give it a light tap with a brass deadbolt hammer to ensure it seated all the way into the bolt interface. Finally, when reassembling in high temp locations use a copper based brake paste as an anti seize. Wurth and molycote have some good products in that category. With fairing bolts that mount to metal anchors and heatsheild bolts use a medium grade locktite or they will come loose. Do not locktite bolts going into rubber anchors.

For extraction of stripped bolts I prefer using extractors that grab the outside of the bolt head, and use ez out extractors that require drilling as a last resort. To remove a broken ez out you typically need a boron steel rated cryotreated bit, so be careful.

I've been doing this stuff for a living for years, and was the go to guy in every shop when people stripped or broke things off. It was a welcome relief from being the go to guy for all the major electrical faults and intermittant problems that got sent to me after multiple techs had failed.
 

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Last but not least. Invest in a couple quality torque wrenches. The snap on digital ones have been great, but there is nothing wrong with a good mechanical hazet or snap on. Get a 1/4 inch and a 1/2 inch drive with wide ranges. Always store mechanical ones set at their lowest setting. You can typically find good used ones too, but have the mechanical one calibrated if you get it used.
 

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Wouldn't it be cheaper & quicker to install DZUS fasteners on the fairings?

Wurth also sell LH drills that make good screw extractors.

Craig
 
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