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Discussion Starter · #303 ·
Awesome pictures. Both of you look pretty spot on. This bike definitely has a specific BP that works the best and for me it has taken a lot of trial and error. Great examples here.
 

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Court Jester
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Awesome pictures. Both of you look pretty spot on. This bike definitely has a specific BP that works the best and for me it has taken a lot of trial and error. Great examples here.
I only got in 2 track days and the 1st one was at a new track (to me) there were no photographers that day, sucks because I'd really like to see where I'm at on right handers. The ridge is mostly lefts...
 

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Looking good TChase. I really need to get my upper body down. I felt a lot better this time around but after seeing my photos I just want to get my ass back out there immediately and focus on it more.

Second track day of the year and my third overall. I saw a huge drop in lap times between 1-2 but not quite the jump I hoped for this time around. Still knocked about 2 seconds off. Progress is progress.

I am hooked now more than ever and I plan on hitting it hard next year. This year was tough with a new baby and a wife on mat leave. Hopefully I can sink some money into suspension over the winter as my bike is currently sprung for somebody about 70 lbs more than me. The track has....character...so things get interesting.

I am pretty reserved on the street so I had to learn a lot from threads like this so thank you for that.

 

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Im still new to riding track and aggressively dude. Only been about a year and a half..

Track riding only about a year ago.. just find a twisty road and go back and forth on a few different types of corners... it helps.

I did some corner working for CSS (California Superbike School) and it helped me out a lot with corner entry speed. Just take your time, it'll happen. I'm still only like a B group rider (and not even one of the top ones). It takes time...

I started this thread to keep up with my progress. seeing the evolution has been pretty fun and has inspired me to continue to learn.. I encourage you to do the same.. Buy the pictures from your track days, have one of your riding buddies stand on one of the corners you choose to ride and take turns filming eachother. All those things really help in understanding what you're doing right and what you're doing wrong. My progress has been slow, but it's undeniable that there has been some progress. Even beyond the speed factor, I can see it in my pictures and videos.

Everyone can improve but it really helps having a log (pics and videos) for both motivation and critique.
I like this tread and enjoy that you are using it to keep up with your profess and seeing the evolution of your riding! I think the important thing with body position is to understand the roll that good body position plays in your riding.

I was just private coaching a girl who was brand new to riding (I've been a coach with the California Superbike School for 13 years now) and she had been working with a few people that were spending a lot of time trying to get her to focus on her body position. The problem was that she didn't have any of the fundamentals down pat yet, namely how to properly steer the bike. I ran her through the steering drill that we put all our level one students through and once she had a good understanding of how to steer the bike her body position improved on its own. From there I made some small changes to help her with the effectiveness of her steering input, and to have her going with the bike (instead of fighting it) etc etc. I never put much emphasis on the actual body position because as each technique was executed, getting the turn points in the right spot, turning the bike quicker, being relaxed on the bike etc....her body position improved along with it.

On the second day right at the end I made a few final tweaks with her body position as she has started going fast enough to require hanging off...and suddenly she was dragging her knee!

The point is, that good body position is often a bi-product of good all around riding technique and not always just body position.

That being said, what are the main things that good body position do? Why is it important to have good body position, and how might you define "good?"

:D
 

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Discussion Starter · #309 ·
I like this tread and enjoy that you are using it to keep up with your profess and seeing the evolution of your riding! I think the important thing with body position is to understand the roll that good body position plays in your riding.

I was just private coaching a girl who was brand new to riding (I've been a coach with the California Superbike School for 13 years now) and she had been working with a few people that were spending a lot of time trying to get her to focus on her body position. The problem was that she didn't have any of the fundamentals down pat yet, namely how to properly steer the bike. I ran her through the steering drill that we put all our level one students through and once she had a good understanding of how to steer the bike her body position improved on its own. From there I made some small changes to help her with the effectiveness of her steering input, and to have her going with the bike (instead of fighting it) etc etc. I never put much emphasis on the actual body position because as each technique was executed, getting the turn points in the right spot, turning the bike quicker, being relaxed on the bike etc....her body position improved along with it.

On the second day right at the end I made a few final tweaks with her body position as she has started going fast enough to require hanging off...and suddenly she was dragging her knee!

The point is, that good body position is often a bi-product of good all around riding technique and not always just body position.

That being said, what are the main things that good body position do? Why is it important to have good body position, and how might you define "good?"

:D
Hey Misti.. Thanks! Really stoked that you decided to chime in. I'm not sure whether I met you or not, but I have done some corner working for you guys at Streets a few times and I always try to soak in whatever I see you guys helping the students with on track. I got a ton of respect for all of the instructors at CSS. All of you are extremely talented.

That being said, what are the main things that good body position do?
Keeps the weight to the inside of the corner and allows the bike to take a given corner with less lean angle. Less lean = more throttle.

Why is it important to have good body position, and how might you define "good?"
I'd say it's important because with less lean you can go faster while being safer. Defining "good" is where it gets a little dicey because I have seen fast riders with varying body positions. There are always some commonalities like shifting ur rear toward the inside of the corner, dropping your head, not being all up against the tank...

One of the main reasons for this thread was to get to see how people are riding the 848/1x98 series bikes since the ergos on them are a bit different than some other bikes I have been on (narrow tank, lots of front weight bias, lower clip-ons). My first issue was gripping the tank since it was so narrow, so I got some tank grips.. helped a lot.. Also read a lot about "pivot points" (CSS).. those two things helped a lot with my connection to the bike which then allowed me to start working more on my BP and hanging off.
 

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Hey Misti.. Thanks! Really stoked that you decided to chime in. I'm not sure whether I met you or not, but I have done some corner working for you guys at Streets a few times and I always try to soak in whatever I see you guys helping the students with on track. I got a ton of respect for all of the instructors at CSS. All of you are extremely talented.



Keeps the weight to the inside of the corner and allows the bike to take a given corner with less lean angle. Less lean = more throttle.



I'd say it's important because with less lean you can go faster while being safer. Defining "good" is where it gets a little dicey because I have seen fast riders with varying body positions. There are always some commonalities like shifting ur rear toward the inside of the corner, dropping your head, not being all up against the tank...

One of the main reasons for this thread was to get to see how people are riding the 848/1x98 series bikes since the ergos on them are a bit different than some other bikes I have been on (narrow tank, lots of front weight bias, lower clip-ons). My first issue was gripping the tank since it was so narrow, so I got some tank grips.. helped a lot.. Also read a lot about "pivot points" (CSS).. those two things helped a lot with my connection to the bike which then allowed me to start working more on my BP and hanging off.
All great stuff!! Not sure if I've met you either but corner working with CSS is an awesome gig! And yes, anytime you can get any info from the coaches is good, they are all amazing at what they do!!

Good BP =less lean which = more throttle correct. The whole idea of body position is to actually lean the bike over less! It bugs me when people try to hang off really far so they can get a knee down but in doing so they end up "crossing up on the bike, pushing it underneath themselves and actually leaning it over further than necessary.

Good body position should also include being able to keep your arms and upper body RELAXED on the bike. If you are hanging off but death gripping the handlebars in order to do so then it's not exactly good BP in my opinion.

Gripping the tank with your outside knee is a good start and as you mentioned, tank grip really really helps.

What else can you do with your outside knee (or both knees) to ensure a good "lock on?" Why is it important to have a solid connection with your knee to the tank?
 

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Discussion Starter · #313 · (Edited)
What else can you do with your outside knee (or both knees) to ensure a good "lock on?"
This is something I still find I have a problem with. I still feel like I have a lot of my weight on my inside peg which lets me know I don't have a good lock on my outside thigh to the tank. I have tried the ankle as another pivot point, but I feel like it's not as "secure" feeling as I like. I try locking on with my thigh but I think sometimes, I don't sit far back enough in the seat to get a good position to lock on the tank with my knee. Which also winds up making me really sit tall on the bike (being all up on the tank). Definitely need some help with keeping myself low on the bike. It just feels really awkward.

Why is it important to have a solid connection with your knee to the tank?
Keeping the weight off your hands and not unsettling the suspension. This is still pretty hard to do when going downhill. working on this a lot though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #314 ·
Some squid shots

Couple of shots riding through Mulholland in full on squid mode:ahhh:

I don't ever normally ride dressed like this but it was a really nice day out and I wasn't pushing the pace at all.

Looking kinda disconnected from the tank in these. Not sure if it's noticeable, but I'm trying to lock in using my ankles against the heel guard too. Definitely not a very good anchor point but it helps with not putting too much weight on the clip-ons. Still kinda feeling like I'm too far up in the seat.

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Feel free to correct me. I have a long way to go with BP but looking at that photo I think you need to scoot back in the seat. Being so close to the tank is causing you to be crossed up a bit and not able to get more of your outside leg/knee area on the tank. You are turning around the tank. Could be the angle of the photo but that is how it looks to me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #316 ·
Locked in

This is with a tight grip on the tank. Felt way more loose on the bike and was able to get my head a bit lower. Still gotta get the head down a bit more and get my elbow closer to my knee but I realized again how much better it feels to slide back further in the seat.

In this picture, I consciously made an effort to get back further in the seat and I felt much better. No weight on the arms and I had a very good lock on the tank with my outside thigh.

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Discussion Starter · #317 ·
Feel free to correct me. I have a long way to go with BP but looking at that photo I think you need to scoot back in the seat. Being so close to the tank is causing you to be crossed up a bit and not able to get more of your outside leg/knee area on the tank. You are turning around the tank. Could be the angle of the photo but that is how it looks to me.
Yep.. you're right. I was too far up on the tank. Although I'm never really crossed up in any of the pictures, there is a noticeable difference in "feel" when I'm further back in the seat. My only issue (which I'm just going to have to get used to) is that I always feel like I'm so high up on the bike when I sit back in the seat. Over the next few months, I'm going to really concentrate on keeping myself further back. Starting to feel things slowing down for me which is going to ultimately help me up my pace.
 

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This is something I still find I have a problem with. I still feel like I have a lot of my weight on my inside peg which lets me know I don't have a good lock on my outside thigh to the tank. I have tried the ankle as another pivot point, but I feel like it's not as "secure" feeling as I like. I try locking on with my thigh but I think sometimes, I don't sit far back enough in the seat to get a good position to lock on the tank with my knee. Which also winds up making me really sit tall on the bike (being all up on the tank). Definitely need some help with keeping myself low on the bike. It just feels really awkward.



Keeping the weight off your hands and not unsettling the suspension. This is still pretty hard to do when going downhill. working on this a lot though.
Ok, you said that you may be sitting too close to the seat and you can't get a good lock on which is good observation. If you sat back a bit further would your knee and lower thigh connect to the tank better? What happens when you lift your heel up and press into the foot peg with the ball of your foot? Does it make the lock on stronger?

Couple of shots riding through Mulholland in full on squid mode:ahhh:

I don't ever normally ride dressed like this but it was a really nice day out and I wasn't pushing the pace at all.

Looking kinda disconnected from the tank in these. Not sure if it's noticeable, but I'm trying to lock in using my ankles against the heel guard too. Definitely not a very good anchor point but it helps with not putting too much weight on the clip-ons. Still kinda feeling like I'm too far up in the seat.

View attachment 107105
View attachment 107113
Yes, too far forward, not enough lock on (read comment above)

This is with a tight grip on the tank. Felt way more loose on the bike and was able to get my head a bit lower. Still gotta get the head down a bit more and get my elbow closer to my knee but I realized again how much better it feels to slide back further in the seat.

In this picture, I consciously made an effort to get back further in the seat and I felt much better. No weight on the arms and I had a very good lock on the tank with my outside thigh.

View attachment 107634
Much better.
 
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