Ducati.org forum banner
21 - 24 of 24 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
124 Posts
Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Service

it was not a random number. My Dealer told me $1000 a year for service.

I do my own oil, filter, brake flush, tires, etc. But valves and belts would be beyond me!


Anyone who would say that, hasn't ever owned a Ducati of previous generations. The 749/999 is a pretty reliable machine. They already have the updated rocker arms, the 749S/R has the tapered collet valve retention system and so does the 999R, which is extremely reliable. They use better crank bearings then even the modern generation's.



There were some electrical gremlins in the 749/999 which caused a few people to call them unreliable. But honestly, the motor is pretty bullet proof. If you don't dunk the bike in water, its plenty reliable. They simply don't like getting wet.

The 05/06 series is the best reliability wise. They fixed a lot of issues with those bikes.



Yea right?!?! WOW, I have no idea how that got into your mind, what an arbitrary number. Service intervals are pretty much every 7500 miles for valve clearance check (which you can do at home) and 15,000 miles for cam belt change. When you buy a used bike and don't have a record of service performed, it may be wise to replace the belts and do the clearance check up front. There is no other service required outside of standard fluid changes.



If you put the 999 up against a 2014 Yamaha R6, yea the 999 is a horrible track bike. But so is the 848/1098/1198, they all have the same issues.

ALL Ducati superbikes need a longer swing arm, a shorter offset front end, a linear rear link, proper suspension setup for the track AND a slipper clutch. Doesn't matter what year, doesn't matter which generation, they all suffer from the same maladies. Mind you, the Panigale is an entirely different bike, which fixes all these issues. :)

But yea, buy the parts, put them on and the 999 will sing around the track. A lot of people prefer the 749/999 body style over the 848/1098/1198 for track riding. Yea they're a bit heavier, but in the long run if you can ride the bike faster, then might as well stick with it.

I personally prefer the 749/999 as a track bike over the 848/1098/1198 because its easier to work on. The fuel tank, seat and tail can be assembled as one piece in track trim, meaning its easy access to take apart. The airbox is a two piece, meaning easy access as well. The long and thin fuel tank is a huge positive for anyone AND frankly, the bike feels thinner then its predecessors due to the narrower diameter tubing.

If I were going to buy a 999 today, I'd buy a 05/06 999R. Send the shock and forks out to get dialed in for my riding weight, put a linear link on it, put 30mm offset clamps on it and a slipper. But the 999S is perfectly fine and its a lot cheaper. I just prefer the R because its a higher revving machine and its got a bit more power. I miss my 749R, to this day, I think it was the best production middleweight superbike Ducati made.
 

· Banned
Joined
·
5,501 Posts
it was not a random number. My Dealer told me $1000 a year for service.

I do my own oil, filter, brake flush, tires, etc. But valves and belts would be beyond me!
Unfortunately, you shouldn't be buying a used Ducati without ANY ability to do service on your own. I think the dealer was giving you an "average" number because some years will be higher then others. These bikes are very easy work on compared to their Japanese counterparts and honestly, anyone willing to turn a wrench, should be able to do basic stuff like check valve clearness and replace belts. Those are the only two major maintenance things which will happen that save you money if YOU can do them.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
4,316 Posts
These bikes are very easy work on compared to their Japanese counterparts and honestly, anyone willing to turn a wrench, should be able to do basic stuff like check valve clearness and replace belts. Those are the only two major maintenance things which will happen that save you money if YOU can do them.
With you most of the way... unfortunately many riders aren't going to be able to do those two things without screwing it up, and that gets expensive/dangerous. Another thing to consider is that by the time you buy feeler gauges, a good shim kit, the timing holder doohickey, etc. you're already close to the cost of a dealer valve service. It really only pays if off if you do it at least twice or have a buddy with all the supplies.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Andrew848

· Banned
Joined
·
5,501 Posts
With you most of the way... unfortunately many riders aren't going to be able to do those two things without screwing it up, and that gets expensive/dangerous. Another thing to consider is that by the time you buy feeler gauges, a good shim kit, the timing holder doohickey, etc. you're already close to the cost of a dealer valve service. It really only pays if off if you do it at least twice or have a buddy with all the supplies.
Ohh, I wouldn't have him REPLACE shims, just check the clearances. Replacing shims is a complex process that does require a bit of finesse and understanding of engines. As you said, its also costly because you've gotta buy tools/shims to replace them as well. But if you check the clearances and they're all good, you can put the valve cover back on again and keep riding for another 7500 miles. Thats a lot cheaper then $1000 bux! :)
 
21 - 24 of 24 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top