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I have been riding my new (to me) D16rr on the street with only 240 Miles on it. I believe that all of the fork and shock settings are stock. The bike is beating the crap out of me over bumps. I have checked the spring preload on the rear shock and it is all the way backed off.
Can anyone suggest spring and dampings settings for the forks and shock for riding on bumpy backroads as a starting point. I weigh 185 Lb in riding gear. I don't want to change springs right now, just ride the bike. But if I have to, I will.

Thanks for your help!

Regards,
Brian
 

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There's not a lot you can do to make a D16RR suitable for bumpy back roads.

The first step is to set your sag, but at 185 lb. you're not off by much. Spring stiffness and preload only affect the ride height, so any adjustment here will not change the bike's ability to absorb bumps. That's the job of the dampers.

The low-speed damper adjustments change the amount of time it takes to settle the bike's suspension movement after hitting a bump. In a race, and in most road situations, you want to absorb the bump and settle the suspension quickly — without upsetting the handling. That's how the stock damper settings are selected by Ducati test riders.

The high-speed damping circuit uses an internal shim stack much like a a pressure relief valve when the bike encounters potholes and is adjustable only by re-valving the dampers.

Finally, the amount of suspension movement designed-in to a hypersports bike is much less than a multisport or off road type bike, so the ride over rough roads is necessarily harsher to avoid bottoming out the suspension.
 

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Set the sag first. Street settings should be about 35-40mm total sag (from the suspension unweighted to bike on the ground with rider). You probably won't get there with the stock springs, though.

Set the damping to the factory settings. That's a good baseline starting point. Make sure the chassis is set up correctly - forks set in the triple clamps with just the caps proud and 12mm of threads showing above the rear shock nut.

Compression damping is the setting that most contributes to a harsh feeling. Insufficient compression damping feels wallowy, the front dives too quickly under braking with insufficient compression damping in the fork and the bike can run wide exiting a corner on the gas with insufficient compression damping in the rear.

Too much compression feels harsh and the excessive compression damping in the forks prevents weight transfer to the front, making it hard to turn. Excessive compression damping in the rear can reduce rear traction under acceleration from insufficient weight transfer to the rear.

I used this troubleshooting guide this weekend at the track last weekend to adjust my wife's bike and it seemed to work well. Suspension Tuning Guide-Suspension Troubleshooting Symptoms | Sport Rider
 
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