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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok so I'm not a wus by any means. I will flip my quad and get back on, I will get bucked off a horse and keep riding but I can't get myself back on a bike. I think about it all day and I'm so incredibly jealous of people on bikes. I have geared up and started my bike get to the end of my driveway and that's when it hits. Honestly I'm sitting on my bike right now, I have been going back and forth in my driveway for almost 2 hours and the minute I'm about to hit the road I can't bring myself to go further. Any advice? I need to ride again I want to ride again!
 

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I remember my first days riding street bikes very well, it wasn't that long ago and I shot a documentary all about it, so the memories come back every time I re-watch. I was scared shitless as well, wouldn't go on the highways, wouldn't leave my neighborhood. My roomie at the time was an avid motorcycle rider and he gave me assignments every night after work. I was so scared, I bought used leathers and great gear all the way around, thinking I'd be down all the time. However, I made it through my training thanks to him and most importantly, the fact I had a goal; I wanted to race motorcycles.

I tell people this all the time and it just whizzes over people's head without being absorbed. If you have an ascertainable goal, you will push yourself to make it happen. Crash, broken bones, broken heart, doesn't matter, your goal didn't change. Getting back up, being strong and pushing to reach your goal, those are the things that will make you a better rider. Having support is also important, I know many people who didn't have any support and never pushed themselves because they were scared what other's would think about them. So there is that mentality as well, which can be challenging to get past.

Honestly, taking up motocross was far harder then street bike/roadracing for me. I was more frustrated with that because you had to not only deal with zero traction, but also had to learn how to fly. I was so frustrated, but I kept at it because I had a goal and I just pushed super hard for that goal. Even in the hospital dealing with injury, all I was thinking about was how long it would take me to get back on the bike again.

Not to degrade quads, but they're more like driving a car since you don't have to balance. Plus, if all you do is ride quads for fun in open land, it's a totally different situation then being around other drivers, on a motorcycle having to balance all the time. Maybe you should buy a dirt bike and learn how to deal with limited traction on two wheels? It may help you get over that fear because you'll understand a lot more about traction.
 

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Then go ride again....think of it as a quad or horse or car or whatever. Your crash was a pretty slow crash, nothing really scary, so what's the problem?
 

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Try to focus on the technical aspects ... right hand
brake, left hand clutch, the coordination required
To get moving. Maybe that will take your
Mind off the dangers.
 

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All I know is if I felt that way, I'd give up...sorry, maybe it's just not for you.
I agree 100%, sounds like another accident waiting to happen
Agreed. After either of my 2 crashes, the thought of not getting back on the bike to ride never even crossed my mind. I learned from it and kept going...after I fixed the bike...that was really the only problem :eek:
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I think you either "ride it like you stole it or trade your boots for shoes"
If your at that point
It was my first ride ever out on the road, I have never ridden a street bike before I crashed the duc. That's a pretty traumatizing thing. If I had done it at the end of the season I probably wouldn't be as shaken up. Think of it this way as it sits right now I crash 100% of the time that I ride. Thinking of it that way is pretty scary. And part of the reason I didn't get back on right away is I have some residual injuries that prevented it. I never once thought I didn't want to get back on. I want it more than anything. So telling me it's another accident waiting to happen is really fucked up. When if you knew anything you would know my bike slipped on gravel and went down going 5-10mph. So before you start talking to people about their lives and riding know what the fuck you ate talking about.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Hopefully this article can provide you some support and assistance.
Women Riders Now - Motorcycling News & Reviews

BTW assuming from your screen name about your gender.
Thank you for this. It was a very good article. I did meet one goal today it may have been a stupid one in your perspectives but before today I couldn't get my bike out and back in the garage alone without dropping it (there is a big lip at the entrance of the garage that screws me up) I'm a smallish girl and my bikes are big so this was a huge victory lol
 

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One of the things an old rider coach told me once: At speed, a bike wants to keep going and stay upright. Anyone can do that. The *real* riders are the ones who have full control at a walking pace. You need muscle, reflexes, balance, and quickness to ride slowly. I'm talking about bumper to bumper traffic slowly. Executing a U-turn slowly. From what I've seen you write, these are the areas you're not confident with, not riding overall. I've mentioned my ex gf before....she could ride her SV-650 around a big parking lot in second and third gear for hours, no problem. But every time she slowed to a stop, she fell over....and she didn't roll into a gravel patch every time, either.
Try practicing in a big empty parking lot. Don't get out of first gear. Get rolling, go a few yards, then slow, brake and stop. Once that's easy, move on to moving the bike a few feet to the right or left...as though you were changing position in a lane. Roll a few, then stop. Start adding traffic type turns as you get comfortable at each level.
As I've said before, a more upright riding position with a more conventional handlebar will make this easier for you...probably best to start working with the Ninja than the Duc. Gravel catches anyone out. Sometimes even years of experience doesn't get you out of a spot. It's amazing how much experience helps...and how many of us have fallen while gaining that experience.
 

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I guess what I'm getting at is that it takes a while to get to the point where...when something happens in front of you...to get from "oh, shit...need to brake...reach for brake....where do I go?....what's my best option?" to just doing whatever is necessary by instinct. Eventually, you just ride....the bike becomes an extension of you...it just does what you want it to do....BECAUSE you KNOW what you want it to do. Getting *TO* that point usually involves a bump or bruise or two for most of us.

An old friend, roommate, racing buddy and teammate, with 15 years experience, crashed in gravel in a corner in the North GA mountains one weekend. He rode his BMW over 100 miles with a broken left wrist before asking me to take him to the hospital. There ARE different levels of commitment and of 'grit'. I don't think many people are as 'gritty' (or maybe, stupid) as Russ was! :D
 

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It was my first ride ever out on the road, I have never ridden a street bike before I crashed the duc. That's a pretty traumatizing thing. If I had done it at the end of the season I probably wouldn't be as shaken up. Think of it this way as it sits right now I crash 100% of the time that I ride.
Well shit! That explains it a bit better. If that was your first time ever riding a street bike out on public roads...that's way more common than you think. You haven't done anything unusual. That's the reason why a lot of people learn how to ride by taking an MSF course. I teach those classes, and so far I've only had 1 single class where nobody dumped a bike. That's the whole point of the class...to learn and improve your confidence in a safe environment and to drop someone else's bikes instead of yours. I've had students that passed and dropped their bikes multiple times throughout the 2-day class. Take a class like that. You may learn a thing or two, but most of all it will help with your confidence.

You are an asshole. Telling someone who is afraid of another accident that they are going to crash again is a dick move. Please go fuck yourself. Thanks
He wasn't trying to be an ass. He was being honest. Your fear of crashing again is messing with your head big time based on your posts. You see, most of us that have crashed at least once KNOW that it will happen again most likely. This is a risk we all take and are willing to accept. Of course nobody wants that to happen, but to live with this constant fear will not do you any good whatsoever. And being afraid of riding everytime you go out riding WILL most likely result in a crash...when you're afraid, other things happen, like panicking, or not having the right reflexes and instincts when something happens out on the road, etc. Imagine how it would be to drive a car, commuting every day to work, while being terrified of driving....you'd probably hit something pretty quick, wouldn't you think??

All Enzo meant to say is that if you have this constant fear every time you get on a bike, than perhaps riding bikes is simply not your thing.

That's like me and roller coasters...just not my thing.
 

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Seems that it may be of help to yourself to seek out another rider near you as well..
Some times, when alone... The mind can dwell..
Perhaps, if you were able to locate another person that rides near you? You may like the follow the leader aspect.. And it may quiet the thoughts in your mind, and bring that smile back..
 

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It was my first ride ever out on the road, I have never ridden a street bike before I crashed the duc. That's a pretty traumatizing thing. If I had done it at the end of the season I probably wouldn't be as shaken up. Think of it this way as it sits right now I crash 100% of the time that I ride. Thinking of it that way is pretty scary. And part of the reason I didn't get back on right away is I have some residual injuries that prevented it. I never once thought I didn't want to get back on. I want it more than anything. So telling me it's another accident waiting to happen is really fucked up. When if you knew anything you would know my bike slipped on gravel and went down going 5-10mph. So before you start talking to people about their lives and riding know what the fuck you ate talking about.
The only street bike I rode before buying my first bike was the 250 from the MSF classes. I bought a Brand New In Crate Suzuki 750 Katana. It was a big hoopla with my mom, her bf and dog and the entire dealer documenting it as I rode off the lot in new leathers and gear on my very first and new bike. Accidentally dropped the clutch, thing revved and rode off without me; I was still standing in the driveway in posture. Bike hit my moms near new truck. Everyone was supportive and helpful and wanted me to get her fixed and try again some weeks later. I said screw that, picked up, twisted back into place the left rear set, mirror and clutch (what was left of it all) and rode home on my brand new mobile scar on wheels. If I didn't I already knew I would have ended up in your position.

While I applaud you in taking the effort, it may have been too long. I suggest something along the lines of freighttrain (in case you haven't already) and start with double up on someone elses and let them take the lead. Then chase them on your bike, this way you can concentrate solely on riding and nothing else. When you get comfortable, you'll move out of that and on your own. Otherwise as previously stated, you may never be so on the road which then poses a safety risk for yourself and others. You need to be comfortable and understanding of the risk you're taking to work through it at some point.

Seems that it may be of help to yourself to seek out another rider near you as well..
Some times, when alone... The mind can dwell..
Perhaps, if you were able to locate another person that rides near you? You may like the follow the leader aspect.. And it may quiet the thoughts in your mind, and bring that smile back..
 

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Thank you for this. It was a very good article. I did meet one goal today it may have been a stupid one in your perspectives but before today I couldn't get my bike out and back in the garage alone without dropping it (there is a big lip at the entrance of the garage that screws me up) I'm a smallish girl and my bikes are big so this was a huge victory lol
Sure, no problem.. glad to be of service.

Having someone to ride with can help.

Enjoy and most importantly be safe ;)
 
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