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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Already ordered kit today, might be a while till they can get my bike in the shop. I just need a good how to guide, a detailed video would be great. I would save 700, but I'd rather pay the dealer.
 

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It really isn;t that hard. Remove your fairings and start at the slip ons unbolting things as you work your way up to the exhaust ports.
 
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I just installed the termi slips on my bike last month. There's a video on YouTube if you want to check it out. I love the sound compared to the original. It's got a lot more bass.
 

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Already ordered kit today, might be a while till they can get my bike in the shop. I just need a good how to guide, a detailed video would be great. I would save 700, but I'd rather pay the dealer.
Here'sa video off Youtube, pretty helpful and straight forward.


The full system requires a bit more effort and wrenching. Asking a buddy to assist you in this process is probably best..
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
That's what I'm thinking, dealer say it's 6.5 hour job. I think there's more than taking off old exhaust and putting new on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
If you can change your oil, you should have the technical know how to do the exhaust install. Having said that, it is a frustrating process. Best to take your time and maybe have a buddy over to assist.
I changed oil on my 848, but not clutch filter. I have complete instruction guide which tells me I need shop manual references which scares me.
 

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Is there something special in the way you do it on a Panigale?? I don't see how swapping exhaust would be that difficult...take the stock one off, and bolt the new one on. It may be time consuming due to the amount of things you have to take off and put on, but there shouldn't be anything hard about it.

Personally, if they charge 700 bucks for the install, I wouldn't even think twice about letting them do it...even if it was half of that, I'd still do it myself. I'll save that money for more complicated stuff, like valve adjustments.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
That's why I am asking maybe somebody on this forum has done it I'm curious about the flapper valve does that stay on with the new exhaust or does it come off
 

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I had the dealer put them on my R at the first service. It took him 7 hours to do it and he basically had to tear the whole bike apart. It didn't look like a fun ordeal to me. Slip ons are a whole different story those are easy, the full system not so much....
 

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Hi, I fitted the full system myself. Had to buy a few small tools, but I took my time. I actually enjoy doing stuff like this.
I downloaded the new map that came with the kit, all no problem at all.
If you have mechanical knowledge and have the time and patience, then go for it.
 

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I Did my full termi install on my R. Flapper and servo do come off and the kit has a dummy plug for the servo connector to protect from dirt and water. The Up-map key tells the ECU to switch to a different program for the full termi. The different ECU program has different fuel/ignition trims and it does not look for the exhaust servo motor anymore.

It is quite the pain in the ass only due to the amount of stuff you have to take loose (most of the fairing and the tail section). There is nothing really hard about the install. Don't skip steps and install all the heat shielding stickers. The muffler to y pipe connections needed a bit of massaging since the holes were kind of oval shaped. use a good bit of lube when sliding the pipes together or they will gall/get stuck. something lite that will burn off quick when you start the bike. don't forget the anti-seize on the threads of the O2 sensors and manifold nuts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Hi, I fitted the full system myself. Had to buy a few small tools, but I took my time. I actually enjoy doing stuff like this.
I downloaded the new map that came with the kit, all no problem at all.
If you have mechanical knowledge and have the time and patience, then go for it.
In the instructions you have to drain the coolant and take off the radiator upper and lower did you have to do that or were you able to bypass that stepped
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I Did my full termi install on my R. Flapper and servo do come off and the kit has a dummy plug for the servo connector to protect from dirt and water. The Up-map key tells the ECU to switch to a different program for the full termi. The different ECU program has different fuel/ignition trims and it does not look for the exhaust servo motor anymore.

It is quite the pain in the ass only due to the amount of stuff you have to take loose (most of the fairing and the tail section). There is nothing really hard about the install. Don't skip steps and install all the heat shielding stickers. The muffler to y pipe connections needed a bit of massaging since the holes were kind of oval shaped. use a good bit of lube when sliding the pipes together or they will gall/get stuck. something lite that will burn off quick when you start the bike. don't forget the anti-seize on the threads of the O2 sensors and manifold nuts.
Can I reuse the coolant or should I get brand new cooling and what other must-haves like tools specifically would you say I would need for this project I've already made up my mind I'm going to do it myself
 

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Did this myself a week ago. You don't need to drain/remove the radiator. One hose is a little in the way of the top bolt for the battery shelf but it's easily bypassed. Removing the radiator would make it easier to reach the front header, but in my opinion it's not worth the extra time and headache. The front header is actually easier to remove than the rear.

If you decide to remove the radiator, go ahead and refresh the fluid. Might as well since you've got it out. And you're more likely to contaminate the fluid if you drain/reuse it vice new fluid. But again, I recommend you don't bother with it, not necessary.

The only ABSOLUTE MUST HAVE is the shaved wrench. Normal wrenches won't even reach half the nuts and you'll round them trying to force it. Use an older wrench or buy a cheap one, then grind it way down. You'll still have to turn most nuts about 1/8 of a turn at a time but it'll be way faster and easier if you're not fighting to get your wrench on there too.

+1 on rpm429's comment about anitseize. It'll make getting them on easier as well as off later on. You can get by without it, but I recommend you use it.

And lastly, be patient. It will take time mostly because of the 1/8 turns I mentioned. That's just how it is. Not hard at all (with the shaved wrench), just tedious.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
If you can do it, so can I thank you very much, shaved wrench and anti seize. I'll check back in when I'm done let you guys know how it went.
 
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