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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I had to remove the front wheel the other day - what a pain in the backside that banjo bolt setup is on the right caliper..

With this in mind, and the fact I'll probably be removing the wheel a little more often - is there a common upgrade that's been done; changing to stainless steel lines from the likes of Hel, with either a T connection like the 998 series bikes, or two separate feeds from the master cylinder..?

Thanks in advance.
 

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So I had to remove the front wheel the other day - what a pain in the backside that banjo bolt setup is on the right caliper..

With this in mind, and the fact I'll probably be removing the wheel a little more often - is there a common upgrade that's been done; changing to stainless steel lines from the likes of Hel, with either a T connection like the 998 series bikes, or two separate feeds from the master cylinder..?

Thanks in advance.
I'm not sure if they still have the promo but i got a set of front and rear galfer stainless braided lines for $100 at motomummy just after xmas. The front is the dual line setup where both left and right lines connect to the master cylinder instead of the crossover. This will lower the height of the banjo on the right side of the caliper. The pads still need to be compressed to remove the caliper, but its easier than with the stock double banjo setup.
 

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Going to 2 front lines from the OEM set up will help. The big issue with the OEM stainless lines is the double banjo on the right caliper where the one lines come in and the 2nd lines crosses over to the left caliper. I believe if you talk to Spiegler, you'd want what's called alt 2 line kit for your bike.
 

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So I had to remove the front wheel the other day - what a pain in the backside that banjo bolt setup is on the right caliper..
You don't need to touch the brake lines when pulling the calipers. Just unscrew the calipers, pull them back from the rotor and give them a twist, they will pop right out. It takes a bit of coordination, but once you know how to do it, there isn't any issue in the future. Another trick is to remove the fender, which will allow you to twist the fork legs. So you can literally yank on the front wheel as you twist the fork legs outwards. This trick allows you to remove the front wheel when out touching the calipers! Though I think you can't do it with the stock crossover line, it's a bit too tight.
 

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You don't need to touch the brake lines when pulling the calipers. Just unscrew the calipers, pull them back from the rotor and give them a twist, they will pop right out. It takes a bit of coordination, but once you know how to do it, there isn't any issue in the future. Another trick is to remove the fender, which will allow you to twist the fork legs. So you can literally yank on the front wheel as you twist the fork legs outwards. This trick allows you to remove the front wheel when out touching the calipers! Though I think you can't do it with the stock crossover line, it's a bit too tight.
? video demo? I always have to open the reservoir and compress the pistons to get the calipers off. There just isn't enough space between the rim of the wheel and the disc to slide it out. The right side is even harder due to the tighter clearance with the double banjo.
 

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What Tuned is referring to is the ability to rotate the fork legs slightly when the axle is out. It's not a lot but just enough to get the caliper off without removing banjo's as is prescribed in the Ducati 1x98 manual for the M4 calipers.

With the caliper loose, axle out and fender off, you grab the lower fork leg and rotate it outwards. You do have to be careful not to mark the rim when the caliper comes out. To help even more with this, once the caliper is loose, grab the top of it and pull outwards. It will slowly come towards you. This pushes the pads/pistons in giving you a bit more twistability.
 

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Yep thanks for that explanation Patrick.

In racing, we don't have time to mess around, so we always come up with quick/easy solutions.

It is a huge pain in the ass due to that double banjo fitting, but it can be done without pulling it off.

They're the only bikes I've ever worked on, where switching to a double hose system is kinda important for track bikes.
 

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This how I do it...Never had an issue yet. Hope this helps.

 
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That's how I've done it. Right down to the gorilla glue tape to protect the rims.
 

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This how I do it...Never had an issue yet. Hope this helps.
Yep, give those calipers a twist! When you recess the pads, (which is kinda necessary for re-installing anyway) they come right off.
 

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Yep, give those calipers a twist! When you recess the pads, (which is kinda necessary for re-installing anyway) they come right off.
I guess i was confused the first time you said give them a twist. what you mean is compress the pistons back into the caliper so there's room to wiggle it out. Based on your description, it sounded like you just popped them right by turning it a certain way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks guys.

Yes, the double banjo is just a pain and I've never been happy pulling against the disc with such force. I know it's unlikey that I could warp the disc is it's not a twist action, but still...

Think I'll source a twin line system - keep it simple!!
 

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You still have to twist the caliper to push the pads in even with a single line running to the caliper, i.e. the left side caliper.

All the pressure put on the rotor gets transferred into the pads being pushed back into the calipers. There is no way you could bend your rotors, by twisting, pushing the pads back into the caliper.

The reason why I take off the left side first, it requires less fluid to be pushed back into the reservoir to get the clearance. With the left side off, as you twist the right side, you now transfer the right side fluid into the reservoir and also into the left caliper which pushes the pads out, as necessary, to allow the right side pads to retreat back into the caliper to get a little more clearance.


Nothing wrong with two lines, I just installed this setup on my Tuono after replicating the 1098 brake system (M4 mono blocks, Brembo 19RCS). I got the brake lines from Galfer, custom made for about $130.

 

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That looks really cool. I looked on his website for the 1098 quick change axle and don't see anything listed, not that I really need anything like this.

Is your video a 848 or 1x98? Just wondering as I don't think the rotors on the 1x98 have enough clearance to allow them to just pivot out of the way like that.

Please prove me wrong :)
 

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It's on an 848, but the OEM Brembo system parts (M4s and floating rotors) came from an 1198. But the ease of how easily they release from the rotors really makes me believe he switched to 320s instead of 330mm (I'd never measured them -size wize- and actually just sent them to a fellow member here, as I've upgraded to Galfer Waves).
 

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Spiegler Alt-2 lines to M4s and FFR Quick Change front axle is a wonderful thing. Never have to touch the fender bolts or the caliper bolts until it's time to clean the calipers during the offseason. :)
Thats the same way I use to take my wheel out… but the fender locked the fork bottoms in place so they wouldn't twist. What magic did you use to allow the fork bottoms to twist with the fender in place? Is that part of the kit?
 

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Thats the same way I use to take my wheel out… but the fender locked the fork bottoms in place so they wouldn't twist. What magic did you use to allow the fork bottoms to twist with the fender in place? Is that part of the kit?
Yep. The fixed fender mounts are cut off and exchanged for swivel mounts to allow the flex.

Word is you can shave off enough material from the front fender to allow it to twist as well without doing the mount conversion. But my forks were already somewhere that does the swivel mounts, so I went that route.
 

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Yep. The fixed fender mounts are cut off and exchanged for swivel mounts to allow the flex.
Got ya, makes sense. I'd love to see the kit if you have a link. I may install it on the 848 I just finished, the client is struggling to get the tire on and off, even though I've showed him the fender trick many times.
 
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