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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought a new 08 that hasn't been ridden, and it has the original tires on it with the date code showing late 2007. The tires look new and don't feel hard or dry, but I'm wondering if they need to be changed. I'm also assuming tire technology has changed a lot in 8 years. I'm guessing it's a good idea to buy new tires, but some insight or experience would be appreciated.
 

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I bought a new 08 that hasn't been ridden, and it has the original tires on it with the date code showing late 2007. The tires look new and don't feel hard or dry, but I'm wondering if they need to be changed. I'm also assuming tire technology has changed a lot in 8 years. I'm guessing it's a good idea to buy new tires, but some insight or experience would be appreciated.

Don't know the technicality of this but my gut tells me that for piece of mind id rather have brand new rubber on any bike. Better be safe than sorry, it's only 300/400 dollars for a piece of mind. We only have two contact points unlike a car that had 4. If I were to buy a used bike, the very first thing I'm doing is changing tires and making sure they are the right pressure. Just my .02 cents.
 

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There's no definitive answer to your question, but one source states that when properly stored away from excessive heat, sunlight (UV) and ozone from electrical equipment such as motors, most street tires have a useful life in service of between six and ten years. Tires with a higher speed rating will degrade the least.

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=183
 

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what? you are really considering not changing 8-year-old tires? on a bike sitting still? :/

i am really not into the technical stuff here but even the showcase damages tires, because they don't move.

i'd change tires AND belts. perhaps more (brake fluid, oil, coolant...)
 

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Yes, change the tires and fluids. Tires' chemical composition will change over time though they may look brand new. I'd say six years max specifically for our high performance tire. Do a google search and you'll see many say about six years. Motorcycles demand much more from a tire than cars, and we only get two!

Def check/change the fluids too. I restored an 04 r6 and the brake fluid was black...
 

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Honestly it really depends, if you are just taking it up to Starbucks I don't see an issue. By asking the question you've got the right mind set, check them before you ride etc. now if you are going to go rip twisties and or go peg it down the straights new tires would be a good idea.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
And as for the belts, I need to do some more research and talking with Ducati service. The one service manager I spoke with already did not seem to think it was necessary. And technically the bike is only 18 months into service, so it's not necessary per the service manual. That being said I do understand the bike is actually pushing 8 years old. But I've always felt the time required belt change on Ferraris is a scam, and I don't see this as any different. I broke a timing belt on an Evo, but it was at 65000 miles and 500+hp. Long story short, I'm not sure what route I'll go with the belt. All fluids will he changed for sure though.
 

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technically the bike is only 18 months into service, so it's not necessary per the service manual. That being said I do understand the bike is actually pushing 8 years old.
Gates, the manufacturer of the Ducati timing (synchronous) belts, state that they expect this type of belt to provide full service life as designed, even if stored for eight years on a drive under tension.

http://ww2.gates.com/IF/facts/documents/Gf000058.pdf

What this means to us is that for low mileage bikes that have been out of service for extended periods of time, or for bikes that see infrequent use but proper storage, belts need not be changed out based on Ducati's time limitations.

The eight year non-operational time limit is dependent on proper storage conditions of the bike as follows:

• Belts should be stored in a cool and dry environment with no direct sunlight – Ideally, less than 85ºF and 70% relative humidity.

• Belts should not be stored near windows, which may expose the belts to direct sunlight or moisture.

• Belts should not be stored near heaters, radiators, or in the direct airflow of heating devices.

• Belts should not be stored near any devices that generate ozone. Ozone generating devices include transformers and electric motors.

• Belts should not be stored where they are exposed to solvents or chemicals in the atmosphere.

Ducati could have specified an eight year belt replacement interval for belts that are known to meet this storage criteria – but this would shift the failure liability to the owner – so they wisely didn’t.

What I’m saying here is that you don’t necessarily have to blindly change the timing belts on low mileage bikes based on Ducati’s time limit schedule if you personally know the bikes full storage and operational history.
 

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Court Jester
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And as for the belts, I need to do some more research and talking with Ducati service. The one service manager I spoke with already did not seem to think it was necessary. And technically the bike is only 18 months into service, so it's not necessary per the service manual. That being said I do understand the bike is actually pushing 8 years old. But I've always felt the time required belt change on Ferraris is a scam, and I don't see this as any different. I broke a timing belt on an Evo, but it was at 65000 miles and 500+hp. Long story short, I'm not sure what route I'll go with the belt. All fluids will he changed for sure though.
Its a function of time or mileage which ever comes first trust me it's no scam check the belts or you might find yourself down the path I did... This was my second failure 1st was under warranty with less than 2k of street miles and it was about 6 months old. The factory put a pulley on wrong. If you are at 8 years you are out of warranty, check them that's all I'm saying...
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I understand your concern, and I do agree that the chances are higher that there would be a failure due to an installation error than an actual belt failure. My point is that I don't buy into the time interval on belt driven motors, but that won't protect from an installation error by Ducati. Though it is a 2008 the bike was originally sold new in April 2014, which is the warranty start date. Therefore it is under warranty until April 2016. This has already been confirmed by Ducati NA.
 

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Court Jester
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I understand your concern, and I do agree that the chances are higher that there would be a failure due to an installation error than an actual belt failure. My point is that I don't buy into the time interval on belt driven motors, but that won't protect from an installation error by Ducati. Though it is a 2008 the bike was originally sold new in April 2014, which is the warranty start date. Therefore it is under warranty until April 2016. This has already been confirmed by Ducati NA.
Roger that then you are golden!
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Roger that then you are golden!

Hope I don't come across as argumentative, and I do appreciate your input. Just saying that I have conflicting thoughts. Bottom line is it certainly wouldn't hurt to check the belts, assuming I could find a tech I trust. That's the part that makes me nervous, I've never been one to let mechanics touch my stuff, but I know very little about these motors.
 
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